WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Innovating in the homeland of lupins May 20th, 2018 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Rhimer Gonzales is an agronomist who has worked in Morochata, in the Bolivian Andes, for three years, introducing new, sweet varieties of lupin: the beans can be eaten directly without soaking them to remove the natural toxins. Rhimer has also been trying, without success, to encourage folks to grow lupins in rows, just like other crops.

Farmers have been growing lupins here for a long time. Wild lupins are common in the canyons of Morochata, an area close to the center of origin for this crop with the gorgeous flowers and edible beans. It seems unlikely that local farmers could learn new ways to grow lupins, yet the use of a farmer learning video has triggered innovations.

I accompanied Rhimer during a recent visit, when we met Serafina Córdoba. She was busy washing dishes under a tree in front of her house, hurrying to finish so she get her kids started on their homework. She explained that the family got a DVD on soil conservation at a meeting of the sindicato (local village organization). Afterwards she watched the videos again with her husband and children. She remembered several of the videos, especially one on lupins and another on earthworms.

When we asked if the family had done anything new after watching the videos, at first she demurred. She wasn‚Äôt sure if the changes they had made in selecting lupin seed were important enough. Before, they would just take a handful of seeds and plant them. After seeing the video she picked out the big, healthy seeds, and the family planted those. The crop is flowering in the field now and do√Īa Sefarina said it looks better than in previous years.

The family also noticed in the video that people planted in rows, in furrows made with oxen. So do√Īa Serafina and her husband Jorge planted a whole field with oxen. She was pleased that this was a fast way to plant‚ÄĒclearly saving time is important for busy families. Rhimer confirmed that planting with oxen was a major innovation. Before, people planted just one row of lupins around the field.

The video emphasized seed selection. But it also showed row planting with oxen, because that is a routine practice in Anzaldo, where most of the video was filmed. Lupins are a more important crop in Anzaldo than in Morochata, even though both municipalities are in Cochabamba.

The value of filming farmers at work is that other farmers watching the video can learn all sorts of unexpected things. Conventional practice in one area can be an interesting innovation for another.

Rhimer explained that he selected the lupin video to show in Morochata because he thought it would be convincing. He was pleased to learn about do√Īa Serafina‚Äôs experience, because the video succeeded in convincing her family to not only select seed, but also to plant in rows.

Each farmer responds to a video in his or her own way. Later we met don Dar√≠o, who had also seen the videos at the meeting at the sindicato, and had later watched the DVD again with his family. Then he planted a whole field of lupins in rows. Unlike do√Īa Serafina, who said that planting in rows was easier, don Dar√≠o said it was more work. But that‚Äôs because he planted a whole field by hand with a pick, on a canyon side. Don Dar√≠o planted his lupins in straight lines up the hillside, and parallel to the slope as well, forming a grid pattern.

Rhimer explained that this lupin was a new, sweet variety and the plants were smaller than those of the bitter lupin that was previously planted in Morochata, so farmer had planted the new, shorter variety too far apart. Rhimer was also frustrated that the farmers were not watering the lupin enough. ‚ÄúIrrigating it one more time would have done it good.‚ÄĚ There is plenty of water here. But folks are still not treating lupins like a major crop, worth irrigating.

Change takes time, even when a community has a good extensionist like Rhimer. I thought he was doing well, successfully encouraging people to plant a new variety, and with a little help from the lupin video, inducing people to select healthy seed and plant in lines. As farmers grow familiar with the new variety they might learn to plant it closer together and water it a bit more, especially if a market develops for it.

Rhimer was modest about his own contribution to changing farmer practices. I suggested that the farmers’ responses to the videos were closely related to his work in the community. But Rhimer said that even though he had shared ideas with people of Morochata for a long time, it was the video that finally convinced the farmers to try row planting and seed selection.

Rhimer’s hard earned standing with farmers meant they were receptive to new ideas. But the videos provided additional, concrete evidence that that the new practices actually worked.

Related blog stories

United women of Morochata

Crop with an attitude

Watch the video on lupins

Growing lupin without disease: Available in English, Spanish, Quechua, Aymara, and French

Acknowledgements

Our work in Bolivia is funded by the McKnight Foundation’s CCRP (Collaborative Crop Research Program). Rhimer Gonzales works for the Proinpa Foundation.

INNOVANDO EN LA CUNA DEL TARWI

Por Jeff Bentley, 20 de mayo del 2018

Rhimer Gonzales es un agr√≥nomo que ha trabajado en Morochata, en los Andes bolivianos, durante tres a√Īos, introduciendo nuevas variedades dulces de tarwi (tambi√©n conocido como lupino, chocho, y altramuz). Sus granos se pueden comer directamente sin remojarlos para eliminar las toxinas naturales. Rhimer tambi√©n ha intentado, sin √©xito, alentar a las personas a cultivar tarwi en hileras, al igual que otros cultivos.

Los agricultores han estado cultivando tarwi aqu√≠ durante mucho tiempo. Los tarwis silvestres son comunes en los ca√Īones de Morochata, un √°rea cercana al centro de origen de este cultivo, con hermosas flores y frijoles comestibles. Parece poco probable que se podr√≠a ense√Īar algo nuevo a agricultores con tanta experiencia con el tarwi, sin embargo, el uso de un video de aprendizaje ha desencadenado algunas innovaciones.

Acompa√Ī√© a Rhimer durante una visita reciente, cuando conocimos a Serafina C√≥rdoba. Estaba ocupada lavando los platos debajo de un √°rbol en frente de su casa, apurada a terminar para poder ayudar a sus hijos con sus tareas. Ella explic√≥ que la familia recibi√≥ un DVD sobre la conservaci√≥n del suelo en una reuni√≥n del sindicato (organizaci√≥n local del pueblo). Luego ella mir√≥ los videos nuevamente con su esposo e hijos. Ella record√≥ los videos, especialmente uno sobre tarwi y otro sobre lombrices.

Cuando le preguntamos si la familia hab√≠a hecho algo nuevo despu√©s de ver los videos, al principio ella se neg√≥. No estaba segura que los cambios que hab√≠an hecho en la selecci√≥n de semillas de lupino eran lo suficientemente importantes. Antes, simplemente tomaban un pu√Īado de semillas y las sembraban. Despu√©s de ver el video, ella seleccion√≥ las semillas grandes y saludables, y la familia las sembr√≥. Ahora el cultivo est√° en flor y do√Īa Sefarina dice que se ve mejor que en a√Īos anteriores.

La familia tambi√©n not√≥ en el video que la gente sembraba en hileras, en surcos hechos con bueyes. Entonces do√Īa Serafina y su esposo Jorge plantaron una parcela entera con bueyes. Estaba contenta de que era r√°pido sembrar as√≠; para una familia ocupada es imprescindible ahorrar tiempo. Rhimer confirm√≥ que sembrar con bueyes fue una gran innovaci√≥n. Antes, la gente sembraba solo una fila de tarwis alrededor de la parcela.

El video enfatizó la selección de semilla. Pero también mostró la siembra en surcos con bueyes, porque esa es una práctica convencional en Anzaldo, donde se filmó la mayor parte del video. El tarwi es más importante en Anzaldo que en Morochata, aunque ambos municipios están en Cochabamba.

El valor de filmar a los agricultores mientras trabajan es que otros agricultores que miran el video pueden aprender todo tipo de cosas inesperadas. La práctica convencional en una zona puede ser una innovación interesante para otra.

Rhimer explic√≥ que seleccion√≥ el video de tarwi para mostrar en Morochata porque pens√≥ que ser√≠a convincente. Le agrad√≥ conocer la experiencia de do√Īa Serafina, porque el video logr√≥ convencer a su familia no solo de seleccionar semillas, sino tambi√©n de plantar en filas.

Cada agricultor responde a un video a su manera. M√°s tarde nos encontramos con don Dar√≠o, quien tambi√©n hab√≠a visto los videos en la reuni√≥n en el sindicato, y luego hab√≠a visto el DVD otra vez con su familia. Luego plant√≥ una parcela entera de tarwi en fila. A diferencia de Do√Īa Serafina, quien dijo que plantar en hileras era m√°s f√°cil, don Dar√≠o dijo que era m√°s trabajo. Pero eso es porque sembr√≥ un campo entero a mano con una picota, en ladera del ca√Ī√≥n. Don Dar√≠o sembr√≥ su tarwi en l√≠nea recta hacia arriba, y de lado a lado, como cuadr√≠cula.

Rhimer explic√≥ que este tarwi era una variedad nueva y dulce y que las plantas eran m√°s peque√Īas que las del tarwi amargo que ya se conoc√≠a en Morochata, por lo que los agricultores hab√≠an sembrado la variedad nueva muy distanciada. Rhimer tambi√©n estaba frustrado porque los campesinos no estaban regando lo suficiente al lupino. “Regarlo una vez m√°s lo hubiera hecho bien”. Aqu√≠ hay mucha agua. Pero la gente todav√≠a no est√° tratando al tarwi como un cultivo importante, que vale la pena regar.

El cambio lleva tiempo, incluso cuando una comunidad tiene un buen extensionista como Rhimer. Yo admiraba su trabajo, animando la gente a sembrar una nueva variedad y con un poco de ayuda del video de tarwi, induciendo a los agricultores a seleccionar semilla y sembrar en línea. A medida que los agricultores se familiarizan con la nueva variedad, podrían aprender a sembrarla más cerca y regarla un poco más, especialmente si se desarrolla un mercado para el tarwi.

Rhimer modestamente atribuía mucho del cambio en prácticas a los videos. Sugerí que el cambio estaba estrechamente relacionado con su trabajo en la comunidad. Pero Rhimer dijo que aunque había compartido ideas con la gente de Morochata durante mucho tiempo, fue el video que finalmente convenció a los agricultores a probar la siembra en líneas y la selección de semilla.

Por su trabajo constante, Rhimer ha ganado la confianza de los agricultores para que reciban a las nuevas ideas. Pero los videos dieron evidencia adicional y concreta de que las nuevas pr√°cticas realmente funcionaran.

Historias previas del blog

Mujeres unidas de Morochata

Cultivo con car√°cter fuerte

Vea el video sobre tarwi

Producir tarwi sin enfermedad: Disponible en espa√Īol, ingl√©s, quechua, aymara, y franc√©s

Agradecimiento

Nuestro trabajo en Bolivia es auspiciado por el CCRP (Programa Colaborativo para la Investigación de los Cultivos) de la Fundación McKnight. Rhimer Gonzales trabaja para la Fundación Proinpa.

Inspiration from Bangladesh to Bolivia May 13th, 2018 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

For years I have thought of farmer experiments as fundamentally different from scientific trials. Smallholders live from their harvest and after trying an innovation for a while can decide qualitatively if it is useful or not. For the scientists it’s the other way around; the data are the precious material they need to write their papers, while the harvested crop is irrelevant. The scientists need replicable results to show that an innovation will work in different places. But the farmers are less concerned if their results are replicable over a large area; they only want to know if an innovation is helpful in their own fields.

That’s what I thought, anyway, but this past week in La Paz, Bolivia I saw how farmers who work together may become more concerned about doing experiments with replicable results. I was with Prosuco, a small NGO that promotes farmer research. Agronomist Sonia Laura, their research coordinator, introduced me to eight farmer-experimenters from all over the northern Bolivian Altiplano. They had travelled for three or four hours from different points across this cold, arid landscape to meet us in El Alto, the sprawling new city growing on the high plains just above La Paz.

These farmer experimenters call themselves ‚Äúyapuchiris‚ÄĚ, an Aymara word that means master farmer. A network of 70 yapuchiris meets irregularly, exchanging information, conducting experiments and teaching their neighbors new ideas (such as making organic fertilizers, natural pesticides and soil conservation).

The day we met in El Alto we discussed future experiments the yapuchiris could do. The president of the group, Miguel Ortega, suggested working on earthworms. He had raised earthworms and used their humus for years to fertilize his greenhouse vegetables. The other yapuchiris were mildly interested, especially because some of them already raised earthworms. They talked about carrying out an experiment on earthworm humus, but were a little vague on what this would be.

Then Sonia played an Aymara-language version of a video on earthworms, filmed in Bangladesh. A year earlier, Sonia had given the yapuchiris a DVD with this and six other videos in Aymara, Spanish, and Quechua. Some yapuchiris had watched the videos and some had not. At home, don Miguel had watched the one on earthworms four times.

After watching the video together the group came alive, defining more clearly what they would do in their earthworm experiment. With don Miguel taking the lead, they first agreed to standardize the types and amounts of food they would give their earthworms, so that the results would be replicable. In the video, Bangladeshi women had measured their materials in small baskets. On the Altiplano, most people have a 12-liter bucket, which Miguel suggested that they use instead of the basket.

Miguel said that the objective of the experiment was to get humus in one month. In his own, previous experience, it could take four months to get humus, and he wanted to speed up the process.

The video suggested mixing cow dung with chopped up banana stems, which are unavailable on the frigid Altiplano. The group kind of got stuck there. Sometimes a little outside facilitation can be useful. I helped them make a quick list of the plant materials they did have, including potato tops‚ÄĒstems and leaves normally discarded after harvest‚ÄĒand various kinds of straw.

That was enough to set the group thinking about how to adapt Bangladeshi techniques to Bolivian conditions. Don Miguel seized the lead again and asked each member of the group if they had potato tops. Only two others did, so he then asked how many had green barley straw. They all did, so they decided that each yapuchiri would make his or her earthworm trial at home with two layers of dung and two layers of barley straw.

The video shows making a home for worms in a cement ring, with a floor of sand, broken brick and earth. Even though the yapuchiris had just seen the video, they couldn’t quite recall all of the materials, their order and thickness of each layer. So we watched parts of the video again.

Again, the yapuchiris adapted. They didn’t have broken brick, so they decided to use small stones instead, to make an earthworm habitat of sand, with a layer of rock on top, followed by earth, straw, manure, a second layer of straw and a final top layer of manure. One advantage of a video is that farmer-experimenters can review it to recall specific details.

One yapuchiri, don Constantino, offered to bring a starter supply of earthworms to their next meeting, so they could all set up their experiments.

These yapuchiris have had a lot of contact with researchers. They were essentially organizing themselves so that each one of them would conduct a replica of a standardized experiment. They all live far from each other and they understand that each yapuchiri lives in a different environment, so they decided to take that into account. They agreed to measure the pH of the water (they have pH paper to do that) and the temperature, which will help later in understanding any differences that could be due to these independent experimental variables.

The yapuchiris need replicable results if they are going to share innovations with others. By collaborating with researches, the yapuchiris are learning the advantages of the scientific method.

The Bangladeshi earthworm video was filmed at sea level, about as far away as one can get from the Bolivian Altiplano (at about 4000 meters). Yet these yapuchiris found inspiration in what they saw and they said that the worm techniques in the video were simpler and more practical than others that they had been taught. This is a direct benefit of sharing knowledge and experience from farmer-to-farmer. Farmers who use an innovation for a few years will simplify it, validate it, and make it practical for other farmers to try, even if those farmers live on other continents.

Further viewing

You can watch the earthworm video in Aymara, English and several other languages at www.accessagriculture.org.

Acknowledgements

Our work in Bolivia is funded by the McKnight Foundation’s CCRP (Collaborative Crop Research Program). Thanks to Sonia Laura, of Prosuco, for sharing various insights with me.

INSPIRACI√ďN DE BANGLADESH A BOLIVIA

Por Jeff Bentley, 13 de mayo del 2018

Por a√Īos he pensado que los experimentos de los agricultores eran fundamentalmente diferentes de los ensayos cient√≠ficos. Los campesinos viven de su cosecha y al probar una innovaci√≥n por un tiempo pueden decidir cualitativamente si sirve o no. Para los cient√≠ficos es al rev√©s; los datos son el material precioso que necesitan para escribir sus publicaciones, mientras que el cultivo cosechado es irrelevante. Los cient√≠ficos necesitan resultados replicables para mostrar que una innovaci√≥n funcionar√° en diferentes lugares. Pero a los campesinos les importa menos si sus resultados son replicables en un √°rea grande; solo quieren saber si una innovaci√≥n es √ļtil en sus propias parcelas.

Por lo menos as√≠ pensaba yo, pero esta semana pasada en La Paz, Bolivia, vi c√≥mo los agricultores que trabajan juntos pueden interesarse m√°s por hacer experimentos con resultados replicables. Estuve con Prosuco, una peque√Īa ONG que promueve la investigaci√≥n de agricultores. La Ing. Sonia Laura, su coordinadora de investigaci√≥n, me present√≥ a ocho agricultores experimentadores de todo el Altiplano boliviano. Hab√≠an viajado durante tres o cuatro horas desde distintos puntos a trav√©s de este fr√≠o y √°rido paisaje para encontrarse con nosotros en El Alto, la nueva ciudad din√°mica que crece en las llanuras arriba de La Paz.

Estos agricultores experimentadores se llaman “yapuchiris”, una palabra aymara que significa agricultor experto. Una red de 70 yapuchiris se re√ļne irregularmente, intercambiando informaci√≥n, realizando experimentos y ense√Īando a sus vecinos nuevas ideas (como hacer fertilizantes org√°nicos, plaguicidas naturales y la conservaci√≥n del suelo).

El d√≠a que nos encontramos en El Alto discutimos algunos experimentos futuros que los yapuchiris podr√≠an hacer. El presidente del grupo, Miguel Ortega, sugiri√≥ trabajar con las lombrices de tierra. √Čl hab√≠a criado lombrices de tierra, usando su humus durante a√Īos para fertilizar sus hortalizas de carpa solar (invernadero). Los otros yapuchiris estaban algo interesados, especialmente porque algunos de ellos ya hab√≠an criado lombrices. Hablaron de llevar a cabo un experimento sobre e√Ī lombrihumus, sin especificar mucho c√≥mo hacerlo.

Luego Sonia toc√≥ una versi√≥n en idioma aymara de un video sobre lombrices de tierra, filmado en Bangladesh. El a√Īo anterior, Sonia les hab√≠a dado a los yapuchiris un DVD con este y otros seis videos en aymara, espa√Īol y quechua. Algunos yapuchiris hab√≠an visto los videos y otros no. En casa, don Miguel hab√≠a visto el de las lombrices cuatro veces.

Despu√©s de ver el video juntos, el grupo cobr√≥ vida, definiendo m√°s claramente lo que har√≠an en su experimento con las lombrices. Con don Miguel tomando la iniciativa, primero acordaron estandarizar los tipos y cantidades de alimentos que dar√≠an a sus lombrices, para que los resultados fueran replicables. En el video, las mujeres banglades√≠es hab√≠an medido sus materiales en peque√Īas canastas. En el Altiplano, la gente tiene un balde de 12 litros, que Miguel sugiri√≥ usar en lugar de la canasta.

Don Miguel dijo que el objetivo del experimento era obtener humus en un mes. En su propia experiencia previa, podría tomar cuatro meses obtener humus, y quería acelerar el proceso.

El video sugiri√≥ mezclar bosta (esti√©rcol) de vaca con tallos de banana picados, que no est√°n disponibles en el fr√≠gido Altiplano. El grupo se estanc√≥ all√≠. A veces, un poquito de facilitaci√≥n externa puede ser √ļtil. Los ayud√© a hacer una lista r√°pida de los materiales vegetales que ten√≠an, incluidas las hojas y tallos de las papas, y varios tipos de paja.

Eso fue suficiente para que el grupo pensara en cómo adaptar las técnicas de Bangladesh a las condiciones bolivianas. Don Miguel volvió a tomar la iniciativa y preguntó a cada miembro del grupo si tenían hojas de papa. Solo otros dos las tenían, entonces él preguntó cuántos tenían paja verde de cebada. Todos la tenían, por lo que decidieron que cada yapuchiri haría su prueba de lombriz en casa con dos capas de estiércol y dos capas de paja de cebada.

El video muestra cómo hacer un hogar para las lombrices en una argolla de cemento, con un piso de arena, ladrillo quebrado y tierra. Aunque los yapuchiris acababan de ver el video, no podían recordar todos los materiales, el orden y el grosor de cada capa. Así que vimos partes del video nuevamente.

De nuevo, los yapuchiris se adaptaron. No ten√≠an ladrillos quebrados, entonces decidieron usar piedras peque√Īas para crear un h√°bitat de arena, con una capa de piedritas, seguida de tierra, paja, esti√©rcol, una segunda capa de paja y una capa superior de esti√©rcol. Una ventaja de un video es que los agricultores-experimentadores pueden revisarlo para acordarse de detalles espec√≠ficos.

Uno de los yapuchiris, don Constantino, se ofreció a traer algunas lombrices para la próxima reunión, para que todos pudieran empezar sus experimentos.

Estos yapuchiris han tenido mucho contacto con los investigadores. Se organizaban esencialmente para que cada uno de ellos llevara a cabo una réplica de un experimento estandarizado. Todos viven lejos el uno del otro y entienden que cada yapuchiri vive en un ambiente diferente, por lo que decidieron tomar eso en cuenta. Acordaron medir el pH del agua (tienen papel de pH para hacer eso) y la temperatura, lo que ayudará luego a comprender las diferencias que son como variables experimentales independientes.

Los yapuchiris necesitan resultados replicables si van a compartir innovaciones con otros. Al colaborar con las investigaciones, los yapuchiris están aprendiendo las ventajas del método científico.

El video de la lombriz de tierra de Bangladesh fue filmado a nivel del mar, lo m√°s lejos que se puede llegar desde el Altiplano boliviano (a unos 4000 metros sobre el nivel de mar). Sin embargo, estos yapuchiris encontraron inspiraci√≥n en lo que vieron y dijeron que las t√©cnicas de lombricultura en el video eran m√°s simples y m√°s pr√°cticas que otras que les hab√≠an ense√Īado. Este es un beneficio directo de compartir conocimiento y experiencia de agricultor a agricultor. Los campesinos que usan una innovaci√≥n durante algunos a√Īos lo simplifican, lo validan y lo vuelven pr√°ctico para que otros agricultores lo prueben, incluso si esos agricultores viven en otros continentes.

Para ver m√°s

Se puede ver los videos sobre la lombriz de tierra en aymara, espa√Īol y varios otros idiomas en www.accessagriculture.org.

Agradecimientos

Nuestro trabajo en Bolivia es auspiciado por el CCRP (Programa Colaborativo para la Investigación de los Cultivos) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Sonia Laura por compartir varias percepciones conmigo.

United women of Morochata May 6th, 2018 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

A success of a woman’s group depends in large part on the quality of leadership, as I saw this last week in Morochata, a highland municipality in the Bolivian Andes. My agronomist friend Rhimer Gonzales had organized women’s groups in two neighboring villages. One group was largely inactive, while the one in the village of Piusilla was going strong.

Rhimer phoned Juliana Garc√≠a, the president of the women‚Äôs group of Piusilla, to arrange a meeting. Rhimer had some group business to discuss, and he was going to help me ask some follow up questions about videos. The previous year, the women had received DVDs with seven videos on soil conservation and I wanted to learn what the women had done with the information. Do√Īa Juliana was not at home, and the women in her group were busy, but she said that if we came back at 8:30 that evening she would have at least some of the women at her house.

By 8 o’clock in the evening it was dark and raining hard. At 3350 meters above sea level it gets cold when it rains, and it’s miserable to get wet. Rhimer and I were sure that no one would come to the meeting, but still we wanted to try.

We were surprised when we got to do√Īa Juliana‚Äôs house to see about half of the women‚Äôs group there. Do√Īa Juliana had taken the time (and spent money) to ring the women up, and had then built a warm fire to welcome them. They soon invited me to ask my questions. The videos included one that Agro-Insight made last year on lupins, edible Andean legumes that improve the soil.

The women said that they had seen two videos with Rhimer at one of their meetings. Afterwards, the women arranged to watch the videos again, by themselves, because they are looking for ways to improve their income, for example by growing lupins and broad beans. They also want to consolidate their position as a women’s group within the sindicato, the local organization that represents and leads the community, but which is made up mainly of men.

Besides the lupin video, they had watched one from Vietnam about making live barriers on steep hillsides to conserve the soil. They recalled, accurately, that the video showed how to measure rows to plant the grass, which had to be transplanted in small clumps or cuttings.

When we asked if they had tried any of the ideas from the video, do√Īa Juliana said that she had learned how to select her seed. One of the key ideas from the lupin video is to remove the small and unhealthy grains, and only plant the best ones for a better harvest. Do√Īa Juliana was impressed by the little hand screen she had seen in the video, to sort the grains by size, but she didn‚Äôt have a screen. Instead, she just sorted the seed by hand, a practice which is also shown in the video. It is important to give people different options.

She has planted the seed and now the crop is flowering. Do√Īa Juliana is impressed that by selecting her lupin seed, the plants are bigger and healthier than in previous years.

Rhimer and I asked how many of the other women in the group had selected seed too. One of them decided it was time for some comic relief. She said ‚ÄúMy husband just grabbed some of the lupine grains in the bag and scattered them, and they are doing just fine.‚ÄĚ

All of the women laughed, including do√Īa Juliana, but then she reminded them: ‚ÄúYou have all seen how to select seed and you know how to do it. So you should all try it.‚ÄĚ

Leadership matters. In time, these women will notice the difference in yield between selected and unselected seed. It usually takes a while for a whole community to adopt an innovation. A useful step is to have one of the leaders adopt and share her experience.

Many of the women are shy, but not do√Īa Juliana. As we are leaving she gave me a firm handshake and said: ‚ÄúNext time come in the daytime, and we‚Äôll all have boiled potatoes!‚ÄĚ I have little doubt that when do√Īa Juliana harvests her lupins she will share her experience with the group. Triggering innovation is like growing a crop: it requires someone to plant the seed. The videos do exactly that: give farmers ideas to try out new things. And by leaving DVDs in communities you give people the chance to learn at their convenience.

Watch videos

Growing lupin without disease is available in English, French, Spanish, Ayamara and Quechua.

Grass strips against soil erosion is available in 10 languages, including Spanish, Ayamara and Quechua

More training videos can be viewed and downloaded from www.accessagriculture.org

Related blog story

Crop with an attitude

Acknowledgements

Our work in Bolivia is funded by the McKnight Foundation’s CCRP (Collaborative Crop Research Program). Rhimer Gonzales works for the Proinpa Foundation, where he helps to implement the Biocultura Project, which is funded by SDC (Swiss Cooperation).

LAS MUJERES UNIDAS DE MOROCHATA

Por Jeff Bentley, 6 de mayo del 2018

El éxito de un grupo de mujeres depende en gran medida de la calidad del liderazgo, como lo vi la semana pasada en Morochata, un municipio en los altos Andes bolivianos. Mi amigo, el ingeniero agrónomo Rhimer Gonzales, había organizado grupos de mujeres en dos comunidades vecinos. Un grupo estaba en gran parte inactivo, mientras que el de la comunidad de Piusilla estaba fuerte.

Rhimer llam√≥ a Juliana Garc√≠a, la presidenta del grupo de mujeres de Piusilla, para concertar una reuni√≥n. Rhimer ten√≠a algunos asuntos del grupo para discutir, y me iba a ayudar a hacer algunas preguntas de seguimiento sobre los videos. El a√Īo anterior, las mujeres hab√≠an recibido DVDs con siete videos sobre la conservaci√≥n del suelo y yo quer√≠a saber c√≥mo hab√≠an respondido ellas a la informaci√≥n. Do√Īa Juliana no estaba en casa, y las mujeres de su grupo estaban ocupadas, pero dijo que si volv√≠amos a las 8:30 esa noche ella tendr√≠a al menos algunas de las mujeres en su casa.

A las 8 de la noche estaba oscuro y llovía fuerte. A los 3350 metros sobre el nivel del mar hace frío cuando llueve, y es miserable mojarse. Rhimer y yo estábamos seguros de que nadie vendría a la reunión, pero aun así queríamos intentarlo.

Nos sorprendimos cuando llegamos a la casa de do√Īa Juliana para ver reunido la mitad del grupo de mujeres. Do√Īa Juliana se hab√≠a tomado el tiempo (y gastado dinero) para llamar a las mujeres, y luego hab√≠a encendido un fuego caliente para darles la bienvenida. Pronto me invitaron a hacer mis preguntas. Los videos incluyen uno que Agro-Insight hizo el a√Īo pasado sobre el tarwi (lupino, chocho, o altramuz), una leguminosa andina comestible que mejora el suelo.

Las mujeres contaron que habían visto dos videos con Rhimer en una de sus reuniones. Luego, las mujeres se organizaron para ver los videos de nuevo, por su cuenta, porque ellas buscan opciones para mejorar sus ingresos, por ejemplo produciendo tarwi y habas. Además quieren consolidar su posición como grupo de mujeres dentro del sindicato, la organización popular que representa y lidera a la comunidad, que es conformado principalmente por hombres.

Además del video de lupinos, habían visto uno de Vietnam sobre el hacer barreras vivas en laderas para conservar el suelo. Recordaron, con precisión, que el video mostraba cómo medir las filas para plantar el pasto, que se tenía que trasplantar en matoncitos.

Cuando les preguntamos si hab√≠an probado algunas de las ideas del video, do√Īa Juliana dijo que hab√≠a aprendido a seleccionar su semilla. Una de las ideas clave del video de lupinos es eliminar los granos peque√Īos y enfermos, y solo sembrar los mejores para una mejor cosecha. Do√Īa Juliana qued√≥ impresionada por la peque√Īa zaranda de mano que hab√≠a visto en el video, para separar los granos por tama√Īo, pero ella no ten√≠a zaranda. En cambio, ella simplemente seleccion√≥ la semilla a mano, una pr√°ctica que tambi√©n se muestra en el video. Es importante dar varias opciones a la gente.

Ella ha plantado la semilla y ahora la cosecha est√° floreciendo. Do√Īa Juliana est√° impresionada de que al seleccionar su semilla de lupino, las plantas son m√°s grandes y m√°s saludables que en a√Īos anteriores.

Rhimer y yo preguntamos cu√°ntas de las otras mujeres en el grupo tambi√©n hab√≠an seleccionado semillas. Una de ellas decidi√≥ que era hora para un poco de alivio c√≥mico. Ella dijo: “Mi marido solamente agarr√≥ algunos granos de lupino del bulto y los lanz√≥, y est√°n creciendo bien.”

Todas las mujeres se rieron, incluida do√Īa Juliana, pero luego les record√≥: “Todas han visto c√≥mo seleccionar semillas y saben c√≥mo hacerlo”. Entonces todos deber√≠an intentarlo.”

El liderazgo s√≠ importa. Con el tiempo, estas mujeres se fijar√°n en la diferencia en el rendimiento entre las semillas seleccionadas y las otras. Por lo general, toma tiempo para que toda una comunidad adopte una innovaci√≥n. Un paso √ļtil es lograr que una de las l√≠deres adopte y comparta su experiencia.

Muchas de las mujeres son t√≠midas, pero no do√Īa Juliana. Cuando partimos, me dio un firme apret√≥n de manos y dijo: “¬°La pr√≥xima vez venga de d√≠a, y todos comeremos papas cocidas!” me queda poca duda de que cuando do√Īa Juliana coseche sus lupinos, compartir√° su experiencia con el grupo. Desencadenar la innovaci√≥n es como cultivar un cultivo: requiere que alguien siembre la semilla. Los videos hacen exactamente eso: dan ideas a las agricultoras para que pruben cosas nuevas. Y al dejar los DVD en las comunidades, la gente tiene la oportunidad de aprender a su conveniencia.

Ver los videos

Producir tarwi sin enfermedad est√° disponible en espa√Īol, ingl√©s, franc√©s, ayamara y quechua.

Barreras vivas contra la erosi√≥n del suelo est√° disponible en 10 idiomas, incluso espa√Īol, ayamara y quechua.

Se puede ver y bajar m√°s videos informativos de www.accessagriculture.org

Una historia previa

Cultivo con car√°cter fuerte

Agradecimientos

Nuestro trabajo en Bolivia es auspiciado por el CCRP (Programa Colaborativo para la Investigación de los Cultivos) de la Fundación McKnight. Rhimer Gonzales trabaja para la Fundación Proinpa, donde él ayuda a implementar el Proyecto Biocultura, el cual es financiado por COSUDE (Cooperación Suiza).

Potato marmalade April 29th, 2018 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

The American anthropologist Mary Weismantel notes that for peasant farmers in the Ecuadorian Andes, cooking is the very last step (before eating) in the long process of growing crops.

During my career I’ve met many agricultural scientists working on better ways to grow more food on small farms, to harvest it more efficiently and lose less in storage. Until recently, I had met few who studied better ways of cooking.

At UMSS, a public university in Bolivia, food technologist, Prof. Jenny Espinoza, and her students are designing new products from potato. They hope that these products will increase the demand for potatoes and raise prices that Bolivian smallholders receive. One student has discovered that unique colors of natural dye can be derived from the various native varieties of Andean potatoes. Another has made pasta from potato flour.

Last week I had a chance to see thesis students Marizel Rojas and Dubeiza Flores making potato marmalade in the food laboratory. Strictly speaking, marmalade is made from oranges, but in South America most jams are called ‚Äúmermelada.‚ÄĚ As with all inventions, such as the lightbulb or metal plow, creating a new food product involves trial and error, with the inventor slowly working towards the target concept.

Marizel and Dubeiza got some suggestions for marmalade from the internet. These weren’t much help, but they were a start. The potato is a good source of pectin, the glue that holds the jam together, but the original recipes produced a lumpy, tasteless paste. Eventually the researchers figured out how much sugar to add, and they learned that fruit had to be added to add more flavor than a plain potato could offer. They also realized that the potato had to be puréed in an electronic blender.

The student researchers learned that the total amount of sugar had to equal 80% of the combined volume of potatoes and fruit, after boiling off most of the water. Then these amounts had to be converted into simple measures that cooks could use without doing any arithmetic.

After watching the thesis students make the jam, we sat down with some of the other faculty and students and ate a whole jar of it on crackers (biscuits). It was delicious, especially when warm, with no taste of potato.

Agricultural inventions often go through several stages. The researcher develops a prototype which farmers validate, and modify, which can then be shared with other communities. They then continue to creatively adapt the idea.

The potato marmalade is still at the prototype stage, but it has come a long way. The students have started to make their products with a farm community in Piusilla, Morochata, near Cochabamba. Only time will tell if potato marmalade becomes popular with consumers, but the research has shown a bit more of the potential hidden in the versatile potato. The trials have been a training ground for two young food engineers. If you can make marmalade from potatoes no doubt many more things can be made from the humble tuber.

Related blog stories

We recently wrote about Bolivian farmers who are marketing value added products.
Marketing something nice

Related videos

Tomato concentrate and juice

Try it at home

If you want to experiment with potato marmalade at home you will need the following:

Ingredients

3 small to medium-sized potatoes (100 grams raw, after peeling and cutting)

1 cup of water

1 small pineapple. Or about 2 cups (or 100 grams)

3 cups of sugar (160 grams)

The juice of 2 small lemons or 2 tablespoons of lemon juice

Makes enough marmalade to fill about 3 jars.

Steps

Peel the potatoes, wash them and cut them into cubes. They should make about 2 cups when cubed, or 100 grams.

Boil the potatoes until they are cooked.

Purée the mashed potatoes in an electric blender with a cup of water, which makes the potatoes easier to blend.

Peel the pineapple, cut it into cubes. Purée it in the blender. It should be about 2 cups or 100 grams of fruit.

Add the pineapple purée to the potato.

Add just 1 cup of sugar. (Don’t add all 3 cups now, or the marmalade will turn brown).

Return the mix to the stovetop and boil for about 15 minutes, stirring constantly. Boil until the mixture is thick. As you boil off the water, the mix should lose about half of its volume.

Add the other 2 cups of sugar and cook for about 5 minutes until the mixture is thick.

Stir in the lemon juice.

Remove from the fire and pour the hot marmalade into sterile glass jars.

Put the lid on the jars and turn the jars upside down to cool. Turning the jars upside down sterilizes the inner side of the lid with the boiling hot marmalade.

MERMELADA DE PAPA

Por Jeff Bentley, 29 de abril del 2018

La antrop√≥loga estadounidense Mary Weismantel se√Īala que para los campesinos de los Andes ecuatorianos, cocinar es el √ļltimo paso (antes de comer) en un largo proceso que empieza con la siembra.

A trav√©s de los a√Īos, he conocido a muchos cient√≠ficos agr√≠colas que tratan de mejorar el cultivo de alimentos en fincas campesinas, cosechar de manera m√°s eficiente y perder menos en pos-cosecha. Pero hasta hace poco, conoc√≠a a pocos que estudiaban mejores formas de cocinar.

En la UMSS, una universidad p√ļblica en Bolivia, la tecn√≥loga de alimentos, la Prof. Jenny Espinoza, y sus estudiantes est√°n dise√Īando nuevos productos de papa. Esperan que estos productos aumenten la demanda de la papa y que suban los precios que reciben los campesinos bolivianos. Una tesista ha descubierto que se pueden derivar colores √ļnicos de las diversas variedades nativas de papas andinas. Otra ha hecho pasta de harina de papa.

La semana pasada tuve la oportunidad de ver a las tesistas Marizel Rojas y Dubeiza Flores mientras hacían mermelada de papa en el laboratorio de alimentos. Como con todos los inventos, como el foco de luz o el arado de metal, la inventora de un nuevo producto alimenticio usa el método de la prueba y error, trabajando lenta pero sistemáticamente hacia el concepto objetivo

Marizel y Dubeiza recibieron algunas sugerencias de mermelada de Internet. Estos no fueron de mucha ayuda, pero fueron un comienzo. La papa es una buena fuente de pectina, el pegamento que aglutina la mermelada, pero las recetas originales produjeron una pasta grumosa e ins√≠pida. Finalmente, las investigadoras calcularon que cantidad de az√ļcar agregar, y aprendieron que hab√≠a que agregar fruta para dar m√°s sabor del que podr√≠a ofrecer una papa com√ļn. Tambi√©n se dieron cuenta de que la papa ten√≠a que ser hacerse pur√© en una licuadora.

Las tesistas aprendieron que la cantidad total de az√ļcar ten√≠a que ser igual al 80% del volumen combinado de la papa y la fruta, despu√©s de perder la mayor parte del agua durante la cocci√≥n. Luego estas cantidades tuvieron que convertirse en medidas simples que las cocineras podr√≠an usar sin hacer c√°lculos matem√°ticos.

Despu√©s de hacer la mermelada, nos sentamos con algunos de los otros profesores y estudiantes y comimos un frasco completo con galletas. Fue deliciosa, especialmente por ser caliente. No ten√≠a ning√ļn sabor a papa.

Los inventos agr√≠colas a menudo pasan por varias etapas. La investigadora desarrolla un prototipo que las agricultoras validan y modifican, que luego se puede compartir con otras comunidades. Luego contin√ļan adaptando creativamente la idea.

La mermelada de papa todavía está en la etapa de prototipo, pero ha recorrido un largo camino. Las tesistas han comenzado a hacer sus productos con la comunidad agrícola de Piusilla, Morochata, cerca de Cochabamba. Solo el tiempo dirá si la mermelada de papa se vuelve popular entre los consumidores, pero la investigación ha mostrado un poco más del potencial escondido en la versátil papa. Las pruebas han sido un campo de entrenamiento para dos jóvenes ingenieras de alimentos. Si se puede hacer mermelada de la papa, sin duda, se pueden hacer muchas más cosas a partir del humilde tubérculo.

Artículos relacionados en nuestro blog

Hace poco escribimos sobre agricultores bolivianos que venden productos de valor agregado.

Algo bonito para vender

Videos relacionados

Tomato concentrate and juice

Pruébalo en casa

Si desea experimentar con mermelada de papa en su hogar, necesitar√° lo siguiente:

Ingredientes

3 papas peque√Īas a medianas (100 gramos crudos, despu√©s de pelar y cortar)

1 taza de agua

1 pi√Īa peque√Īa o unas 2 tazas (o 100 gramos)

3 tazas de az√ļcar (160 gramos)

El jugo de 2 limones peque√Īos o 2 cucharadas de jugo de lim√≥n

Hace suficiente mermelada para llenar alrededor de 3 frascos.

Pasos

Pele las papas, lávelas y córtelas en cubos. Debe ser unas 2 tazas cuando están en cubos, o 100 gramos.

Hervir las papas hasta que estén cocidas.

Haga el puré de papas en una licuadora eléctrica con una taza de agua, para que las papas sean más fáciles de mezclar.

Pele la pi√Īa, c√≥rtela en cubos, haciendo un pur√© en la licuadora. Es aproximadamente 2 tazas o 100 gramos de fruta.

Agregue el pur√© de pi√Īa a la papa.

Agregue solo 1 taza de az√ļcar. (No agregue las 3 tazas ahora, o la mermelada se pondr√° marr√≥n).

Regrese la mezcla a la estufa y hierva durante más o menos 15 minutos, revolviendo constantemente. Hierva hasta que la mezcla esté espesa. Al hervirse, la mezcla debería perder aproximadamente la mitad de su volumen.

Agregue las otras 2 tazas de az√ļcar y cocine por unos 5 minutos hasta que la mezcla est√© espesa.

Agregue el jugo de limón.

Retire del fuego y vierta la mermelada caliente en frascos de vidrio estériles.

Pon la tapa sobre los frascos y ponga los frascos boca abajo mientras se enfríen. Así se esteriliza la parte interior de la tapa con la mermelada hirviendo.

Big chicken, little chicken April 22nd, 2018 by

vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

In her 2017 book Big Chicken, Maryn McKenna tells the story of antibiotic abuse in agriculture. In the 1940s the US military used antibiotics to treat soldiers suffering from infectious disease, one of the first large-scale uses of these drugs. Penicillin had been placed in the public domain, and the world was in an optimistic mood at having a widely available treatment for common infections. Soon after the war, in 1948, British-American scientist Thomas Jukes, working at Lederle Laboratories in New Jersey, showed that chickens gained more weight when their food included antibiotics, even on a poor diet. This was a crucial discovery for industrializing chicken rearing. Until then, poultry in the USA were mostly reared in small batches, allowed to range freely in fields, where they scratched a natural diet of plants and bugs, sometimes supplemented with fish meal. Chickens are by nature highly omnivorous. Discovering that antibiotics helped to fatten chickens meant that the birds could be fed cheap, low-grade maize and soybean.

The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved antibiotics as a growth regulator in the USA in 1951. By the 1950s, a successful chicken farmer in Georgia, Jesse Dixon Jewell, began to expand his operation by selling chicks and feed to other farmers, and buying their finished birds. The feed was laced with antibiotics, partly to boost growth but also to control bacterial diseases. Industry would soon follow this twin example of farming out the birds to contract growers, and including the antibiotics in their prepared rations.

By 2001, Americans were taking 3 million pounds (1.4 million kilos) of antibiotics, while US livestock was being dosed with 24.6 million pounds (11.2 million kilos).

For many years there were few if any concerns about this unprecedented use of a human drug to boost food production, and cheap meat was certainly popular. But this relaxed attitude began to change when research showed that much of the antibiotics ended up in the meat and eggs that consumers ate. This widespread use meant that once valuable drugs began to be compromised as bacteria that caused disease in humans became resistant to the antibiotics.

Under pressure from pharmaceutical companies, the US government was slow to restrict antibiotics as animal growth promotors. Finally, the large poultry companies began to self-regulate. By about 2009 they realized that they could produce birds without antibiotics, simply by using vaccines and improving farm hygiene. By 2014 some of the largest producers in the US, like Foster Farms and Perdue Farms, had stopped feeding antibiotics to chickens. Various grocery stores and fast food chains soon banned chicken raised on antibiotics.

In September 2016 the UN moved to curb non-prophylactic antibiotic use in animals, which was linked to an estimated 700,000 human deaths worldwide, per year. In North America and Western Europe antibiotic abuse was by then largely solved, thanks to improved industry standards, government regulations and public awareness. But McKenna cautions that livestock antibiotic abuse remains a worrying problem in much of South America, South Asia and China.

As soon as I finished reading Big Chicken, Ana and I visited La Cancha, the vast, open air market that still functions in Cochabamba, where we bought a little grey hen and a big red one.

Feeding the hens was a chance to learn what smallholder farmers have always known: that chickens are as omnivorous as people. Chickens prefer meat to vegetables. Ours preferred the smaller, denser grains like sorghum to corn.

Chickens especially like sow bugs, the little roly-poly crustaceans that live in leaf litter worldwide. Our hens learned to knock the seeds off of amaranth plants and then eat the seeds from the ground. Chickens also like table scraps, including meat, but especially eggs.

The longer we keep these birds, now named Oxford and Cambridge, the bigger their eggs get. They both lay an egg every day; clearly the hunter-gatherer diet agrees with them.

The problem, as McKenna explains, is that factory farming made chicken as cheap as bread in the USA and Europe. People living in low income countries now want their chance at cheap meat. Chicken is cheap in Bolivia and easily affordable. In the open air market it sells for just 10 Bs. ($1.40) per kilo and fried chicken restaurants have sprung up all over the city.

Rearing chickens has become a new industry in Bolivia. Farmers can make a barn with cheap lumber and plastic sheeting, buy the day-old chicks and purchase the feed by the bag or the ton. No doubt many of the poultry producers in Bolivia are careful and conscientious. But many growers raise their birds on feed blended with antibiotics, labelled as a growth promotor, and there is little public awareness of the risk of antibiotics in animal feed. While there are compelling reasons to reduce the cost of food in low income countries, the global South also needs to consider the risks of animal antibiotics.

Further reading

Maryn 2017 Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of how Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. Washington DC: National Geographic. 400 pp.

Related videos

Taking care of local chickens

Feeding improved chickens

Working together for healthy chicks

Keeping milk free from antibiotics

Herbal treatment for diarrhoea

BIG CHICKEN, POLLO GRANDE

por Jeff Bentley, 22 de abril del 2018

En su libro Big Chicken de 2017, Maryn McKenna cuenta la historia del abuso de antibi√≥ticos en la agricultura. En la d√©cada de 1940, el ej√©rcito de los Estados Unidos us√≥ los antibi√≥ticos para tratar a los soldados que se padec√≠an de enfermedades infecciosas, uno de los primeros usos a gran escala de estas drogas. La penicilina se hab√≠a colocado en el dominio p√ļblico, y el mundo estaba optimista de tener un tratamiento ampliamente disponible para infecciones comunes. Poco despu√©s de la guerra, en 1948, el cient√≠fico brit√°nico-americano Thomas Jukes, que trabajaba en Lederle Laboratories en Nueva Jersey, demostr√≥ que los pollos ganaban m√°s peso cuando sus alimentos inclu√≠an antibi√≥ticos, incluso con una dieta pobre. Este fue un descubrimiento crucial para la industrializaci√≥n de la crianza de pollos. Hasta entonces, las aves de corral en los Estados Unidos se criaban principalmente en peque√Īos lotes; se les permit√≠a ir libremente a los campos, donde ara√Īaban una dieta natural de plantas e insectos, a veces complementada con harina de pescado. Los pollos son por naturaleza altamente omn√≠voros. Descubrir que los antibi√≥ticos ayudaban a engordar pollos significaba que las aves podr√≠an ser alimentadas con ma√≠z y soya baratos.

La FDA (Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos) aprobó los antibióticos como un regulador de crecimiento en los Estados Unidos en 1951. En la década de 1950, un exitoso granjero de pollos en Georgia, Jesse Dixon Jewell, comenzó a expandir su operación vendiendo pollos y alimento concentrado a otros granjeros, y comprando sus aves terminadas. El concentrado se mezclaba con antibióticos, en parte para estimular el crecimiento, pero también para controlar las enfermedades bacterianas. La industria pronto seguiría este doble ejemplo de criar las aves por contrato e incluir los antibióticos en sus raciones preparadas.

En 2001, los estadounidenses tomaron 1,4 millones de kilos de antibióticos, mientras que el ganado estadounidense se dosificó con 11,2 millones de kilos.

Durante muchos a√Īos hubo poca o ninguna preocupaci√≥n sobre este uso sin precedentes de una droga humana para impulsar la producci√≥n de alimentos, y sin duda la carne barata fue popular. Pero esta actitud relajada comenz√≥ a cambiar cuando la investigaci√≥n mostr√≥ que gran parte de los antibi√≥ticos quedaban en la carne y los huevos que consum√≠an los consumidores. Este uso generalizado signific√≥ que las bacterias que causan enfermedades humanas se volvieron resistentes a los antibi√≥ticos por su uso excesivo en los animales.

Bajo la presi√≥n de las compa√Ī√≠as farmac√©uticas, el gobierno estadounidense hizo poco para restringir los antibi√≥ticos como promotores del crecimiento animal. Finalmente, las grandes compa√Ī√≠as av√≠colas comenzaron a autorregularse. Alrededor de 2009 se dieron cuenta de que pod√≠an producir aves sin antibi√≥ticos, simplemente usando vacunas y mejorando la higiene de la granja. Para 2014, algunos de los productores m√°s grandes de Norteam√©rica, como Foster Farms y Perdue Farms, hab√≠an dejado de alimentar con antibi√≥ticos a los pollos. Varios supermercados y cadenas de comida r√°pida pronto prohibieron el pollo criado con antibi√≥ticos.

En septiembre de 2016, la ONU actu√≥ para frenar el uso de antibi√≥ticos no profil√°cticos en animales, lo que se relacion√≥ con unas estimadas 700,000 muertes humanas en todo el mundo, por a√Īo. En Am√©rica del Norte y Europa occidental, el abuso de antibi√≥ticos se resolvi√≥ en gran medida, gracias a la mejora de los est√°ndares de la industria, las regulaciones gubernamentales y la conciencia p√ļblica. Pero McKenna advierte que el abuso de antibi√≥ticos en los animales sigue siendo un problema preocupante en gran parte de Sudam√©rica, el sur de Asia y China.

Tan pronto como terminé de leer Big Chicken, Ana y yo visitamos La Cancha, el vasto mercado al aire libre que todavía funciona en Cochabamba, donde compramos una gallinita gris y una roja grande.

Alimentar a las gallinas fue una oportunidad de aprender lo que los peque√Īos agricultores siempre han sabido: que los pollos son tan omn√≠voros como las personas. Los pollos prefieren la carne a las verduras. Prefieren los granos m√°s peque√Īos y densos como el sorgo al ma√≠z.

A las gallinas les encantan los llamados chanchitos, los peque√Īos crust√°ceos redondos que viven en la hojarasca en todo el mundo. Nuestras gallinas aprendieron a sacudir las semillas de las plantas de amaranto y luego a comer las semillas del suelo. A los pollos tambi√©n les gustan los restos de comida, incluida la carne, pero especialmente los huevos.

Mientras más tiempo tengamos estas aves, ahora llamadas Oxford y Cambridge, más grandes son sus huevos. Cada una pone un huevo todos los días; claramente la dieta de los cazadores-recolectores les hace bien.

El problema, como explica McKenna, es que las granjas industriales hacían que el pollo fuera tan barato como el pan en los Estados Unidos y Europa. La gente en los países de bajos ingresos ahora quiere la carne barata; les toca. El pollo es barato en Bolivia y es fácilmente asequible. En la Cancha se vende por solo 10 Bs. ($ 1.40) por kilo y restaurantes de pollo frito han surgido por toda la ciudad.

La cr√≠a de pollos se ha convertido en una nueva industria en Bolivia. Los agricultores pueden hacer un granero con madera barata y hojas de pl√°stico, comprar los pollitos de un d√≠a y comprar el alimento por bolsa o por tonelada. Sin duda, muchos de los productores av√≠colas en Bolivia son cuidadosos y concienzudos. Sin embargo, muchos cr√≠an a sus aves con alimentos mezclados con antibi√≥ticos, vendidos como promotores del crecimiento, y hay poca conciencia p√ļblica sobre el riesgo de los antibi√≥ticos en la alimentaci√≥n animal. Si bien existen razones convincentes para reducir el costo de los alimentos en los pa√≠ses de bajos ingresos, el Sur Global tambi√©n debe considerar los riesgos de los antibi√≥ticos en los animales.

Lectura adicional

Maryn 2017 Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of how Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. Washington DC: National Geographic. 400 pp.

Videos relevantes

El cuidado de las gallinas criollas

Feeding improved chickens

Working together for healthy chicks

Keeping milk free from antibiotics

Herbal treatment for diarrhoea

Design by Olean webdesign