WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

The joy of business July 16th, 2017 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

On the 29th of June in Cochabamba, I watched as 39 farmers’ associations met with 183 businesses, in a large, rented ballroom, where tables just big enough for four were covered in white tablecloths and arranged in a systematic grid pattern.

cacao y árbolesAll day long the farmers and entrepreneurs huddled together, in 25-minute meetings, scheduled one after the other, for as many as 15 meetings during the day, as the farmers explained the virtues of products like aged cheeses, shade-grown cacao, and bottled mango sweetened with yacón (an Andean tuber). Some businesses had come to buy these products, but others were there to sell the farmers two-wheeled tractors and other small machines.

mango en alímbar de yacónEach association or business had filled out a sheet listing their interests and products. The organizer used computerized software to match up groups by interest, and set a time for the meetings. The time was tracked by a large, computerized clock, projected onto the wall.

At the end of each of the 25 minute meetings, each table filled out a one-page form stating if they had agreed to meet for another business deal (yes, no, maybe), and if so when (within three months, or later), and the amount of the probable deal. By the end of the day, the farmers and the business people had agreed to do business worth 56 million bolivianos, equivalent to $8.2 million.

Business representatives came from five foreign countries: Belgium, Peru, the Netherlands, Spain, and Argentina, to buy peanuts and other commodities. But most of the buyers and sellers were from Bolivia and only 6% of the trade was for export.

The meeting was self-financed. Each farmer’s group paid $45 to attend and each entrepreneur paid $50. This is the ninth annual agro-business roundtable, so it looks like an institution that may last.

Business is a two-way street. For example, one innovative producer of fish sausages made deals to sell his fine products to hotels and supermarkets, but he also agreed to buy a machine to vacuum pack smoked fish, and another deal to buy trout from a farmers’ association.

la boletaWith over 400 people lost in happy conversation on the ballroom floor, I barely noticed the three staff-members on the side, sitting quietly at a table, typing up each sheet from each deal, using special software which allows the statistics to be compiled in real time. This will also help with follow-up. Two months after the roundtable, professionals from Fundaci√≥n Valles will ring up the group representatives with a friendly reminder: ‚ÄúYou are near the three month mark when you agreed to meet and buy or sell (a given product). How is that coming?‚ÄĚ

Miguel Florido, facilitator, explained that in previous years the roundtable brought in $14 million in business, but that was mostly with banks and insurance companies, signing big credit deals, or insurance policies. Now the money amount has dropped a bit, but people are buying and selling tangible, local products, which is what the farmers want. It can be difficult and time-consuming for smallholders and entrepreneurs to meet each other, but with imaginative solutions buyers and sellers can connect.

Acknowledgment: this roundtable was organized by Fundación Valles and Fundesnap.

LA ALEGR√ćA DEL NEGOCIO

El 29 de junio en Cochabamba, observ√© mientras 39 asociaciones de agricultores se reunieron con 183 empresas en un sal√≥n de eventos, lleno de mesas que eran el tama√Īo perfecto para cuatro personas.

cacao y √°rbolesTodo el d√≠a los agricultores y empresarios se juntaron, en reuniones de 25 minutos, hasta 15 reuniones durante el d√≠a, donde los productores explicaban las bondades de productos como quesos a√Īejos, cacao producido bajo sombra, y frascos de mango endulzados con yac√≥n (un tub√©rculo andino). Algunas empresas vinieron para comprar esos productos, mientras otros estaban en plan de vender motocultores y otras peque√Īas m√°quinas a los agricultores.

mango en al√≠mbar de yac√≥nCada asociaci√≥n o empresa hab√≠a llenado una hoja detallando sus intereses y sus productos. El organizador us√≥ software computarizado para juntar los grupos seg√ļn sus intereses y fijar una hora para sus reuniones. La hora se controlaba con un reloj grande y computarizado que se proyectaba a la pared.

Al final de cada una de las reuniones de 25 minutos, cada mesa llenaba un formulario indicando si habían quedado en volver a reunirse para hacer negocios (sí, no, tal vez), y cuándo (dentro de tres meses, o más tarde), y el monto probable del trato. Al fin del día, salió que los agricultores y las empresas habían fijado tratos por un valor de 56 millones bolivianos, equivalente a $8.2 millones.

Asistieron empresas de cinco pa√≠ses extranjeros: B√©lgica, Per√ļ, Holanda, Espa√Īa, y la Argentina, para comprar man√≠ y otros productos. Pero la mayor√≠a de los vendedores y compradores eran bolivianos y solo 6% de la venta era para exportar.

La reunión era auto-financiada. Cada asociación de agricultores pagó $45 para asistir y cada empresa pagó $50. Esta es la novena rueda anual de agro-negocios, así que parece que es una institución duradera.

El negocio es una calle de dos sentidos. Por ejemplo, un productor innovador de chorizos de pescado quedó en vender sus finos productos a hoteles y supermercados, pero también compró una máquina para embalar su pescado ahumado al vacío, e hizo un acuerdo para comprar trucha de una asociación de productores.

la boletaCon m√°s de 400 personas felices, bien metidas en charlas en el sal√≥n, pasan desapercibidos tres miembros del equipo a un lado, sentados en una mesa, pasando a m√°quina las hojas escritas a mano en cada una de las reuniones. Las tres personas usan un software especial que permite compilar las estad√≠sticas ese rato. Los datos ayudar√°n con el seguimiento. Dos meses despu√©s de la rueda, profesionales de Fundaci√≥n Valles llamar√°n a los representantes de los grupos para hacerles recuerdo: ‚ÄúYa casi son tres meses desde que quedaron en volver a reunirse para comprar (o vender) su producto ¬Ņc√≥mo van con eso?‚ÄĚ

Miguel Florido, facilitador, explica que en los a√Īos previos, la rueda trajo hasta $14 millones en negocios, pero mayormente con bancos y aseguradoras, firmando contratos para cr√©ditos o seguros. Actualmente se mueve un poco menos de dinero, pero la gente vende y compra productos tangibles, locales, que es lo que los agricultores quieren.

Agradecimiento: La rueda de agro-negocios se organizó por Fundación Valles y Fundesnap.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Five heads think better than one July 9th, 2017 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Innovation fairs are becoming a popular way to showcase agricultural invention, and to link some original thinkers with a wider community.

On the 28th of June I was at an innovation fair in Cochabamba, held in a ballroom that is usually rented for weddings and big parties, but with some tweaking it was a fine space for farmers and researchers to meet. Each organization had a table where they could set out products or samples, with their posters displayed behind the presenters.

For example, at one table, I met a dignified, white-haired agronomist, Gonzalo Zalles who explained his work with ‚Äúdeep beds‚ÄĚ for raising healthy, odorless pigs. I told Mr. Zalles about some pigs I had seen in Uganda (Smelling is believing), but Eng. Zalles explained that he makes a slightly more sophisticated bed. He starts by digging a pit, then adding a thin layer of lime to the base, followed by a layer of sand. In Uganda, some innovative farmers raise pigs on wood shavings, but Zalles uses rice husks as the final layer. He says they are more absorbent than wood shavings.

I asked if he added Effective Microorganisms (a trademarked brand of yeast and other microbes that are used widely, not just in Uganda, but also to make bokashi fertilizer in Nepal, see The bokashi factory). But no, in Bolivia, swine farmers are using a mix of bacteria and yeast called BioBull, which is made by Biotop, a subsidiary of the Proinpa Foundation in Cochabamba.

José Olivera CamachoAt a nearby stall I caught up with José Olivera of Biotop who was displaying not just BioBull, but other biological products as well, including insecticides and fungicides for organic agriculture. José travels all over the Bolivian Altiplano selling these novel inputs to farmers. He may soon have another product to sell, if research goes to plan at the Panaseri Company, in Cochabamba. Panaseri collaborates with Proinpa to produce food products from the lupine bean, packaged for supermarkets under the brand Tarwix.  At the Panaseri stand, Norka Ojeda, a Proinpa communicator, explained that the Tarwix factory buys lupine beans (tarwi) from farmers and washes out the poisonous alkaloids, rendering the nutritious tarwi safe to eat. (Read more about lupines at Crop with an attitude).

tarwixThe people at Panaseri originally disposed of the alkaloids without any treatment. But they became concerned about the environmental impact, so they installed filters at their plant to remove the toxins from the water. Now researchers at Biotop are studying the possibility of using the alkaloids as ingredients in new botanical insecticides.

Linking researchers to farmers’ associations and companies seems to be bearing fruit. Raising swine without the bad smell is crucial for keeping livestock near cities, where it is easy to get supplies and the market for the final product is nearby. Inventing new bio-pesticides is key to keeping chemical poisons out of our food.  Many heads think better than one.

Acknowledgements

The innovation fair was hosted by Fundación Valles, Fundesnap and other partners of the Fondo de Innovación on 28 June 2017, with funding from Danida (Danish Aid).

Further viewing

Watch a video on tarwi here.

CINCO CABEZAS PIENSAN MEJOR QUE UNA

Las ferias de innovación se están volviendo una manera popular de mostrar la invención agrícola, y para organizar a algunas personas creativas en una comunidad mayor.

El 28 de junio asist√≠ a una feria de innovaci√≥n en Cochabamba, en un sal√≥n de eventos que normalmente se alquila para bodas y quincea√Īeras, pero con algunos ajustes sirvi√≥ perfectamente para el encuentro de agricultores e investigadores. Cada organizaci√≥n ten√≠a una mesa donde pod√≠an mostrar sus productos o muestras, con sus p√≥steres a la vista detr√°s de los interesados.

Por ejemplo, en una mesa conoc√≠ a un destacado agr√≥nomo con una cabellera blanca, Gonzalo Zalles quien explic√≥ su trabajo con ‚Äúcamas profundas‚ÄĚ para criar a chanchos sanos sin olores. Le cont√© al Ing. Zalles de los cerdos que yo hab√≠a visto en Uganda (Smelling is believing), pero √©l explic√≥ que √©l hace una cama un poco m√°s sofisticada. Empieza cavando una fosa, agregando una capa de cal y una de arena. En Uganda, Algunos agricultores innovadores cr√≠an a los cerdos en aserr√≠n, pero el Ing. Zalles usa c√°scara de arroz como la √ļltima capa. √Čl dice que es m√°s absorbente que el aserr√≠n.

Le pregunté si él agregaba los Microorganismos Efectivos (una marca registrada de levadura con otros microbios que se usa ampliamente, no solo en Uganda, sino también para hacer fertilizante tipo bokashi en Nepal, vea The bokashi factory). Pero no, en Bolivia, los porcicultores usan una mezcla de bacteria con levadura llamada BioBull, un producto de Biotop, que es un subsidiario de la Fundación Proinpa en José Olivera CamachoCochabamba.

En otra mesa encontr√© a Jos√© Olivera de Biotop quien mostraba no solo el BioBull, sino otros productos biol√≥gicos, incluso insecticidas y fungicidas para la agricultura org√°nica. Jos√© viaja por todo el Altiplano boliviano vendiendo esos insumos novedosos a los agricultores. √Čl pronto tendr√° otro producto para vender, si la investigaci√≥n va bien con la compa√Ī√≠a Panaseri, en Cochabamba. Panaseri colabora con Proinpa para producir empaquetar tarwi (lupino) para supermercados, bajo la marca Tarwix.¬† En el stand de Panaseri, Norka Ojeda, comunicadora de Proinpa, explic√≥ que la f√°brica de Tarwix compra tarwi de los productores y lava los venenosos alcaloides, para que el nutritivo tarwi sea sano para comer. (Lea m√°s sobre el tarwi aqu√≠: Cultivo con car√°cter fuerte).

tarwixLa fábrica de Panaseri tiene que descartar los alcaloides, pero la empresa se cuestionó del impacto ambiental, así que instalaron filtros en su planta para quitar las toxinas del agua. Ahora los investigadores de Biotop están estudiando la posibilidad de usar los alcaloides como ingredientes en nuevos insecticidas botánicos.

Vincular los investigadores con asociaciones de productores y empresas parece dar fruto. Criar cerdos sin malos olores es crucial para la porcicultura cerca de las ciudades, donde es conveniente comprar la comida de los cerdos y vender los productos finales. El invento de nuevos bio-plaguicidas es clave para evitar de envenenar nuestra comida. Sí parece que varias cabezas piensan mejor que una sola.

Agradecimientos

La Feria de Innovación fue auspiciada por la Fundación Valles, Fundesnap y otros socios del Fondo de Innovación el 28 de junio del 2017, con financiamiento de Danida (Ayuda Danesa).

Para ver m√°s

Vea el video sobre tarwi aquí.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

An illusion in the Andes April 30th, 2017 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n.

When five, roughly rectangular blocks appeared on the mountainside high above Cochabamba, I assumed they were just fields of oats. The pale green shade seemed about right for the feathery grain, and the cool climate was ideal for oats.

oat fieldsHowever, social media soon turned the checkered slope into a mystery.  Cochabambinos began writing into a popular website to ask about the odd shapes. Some rushed in with answers. There was even one far-fetched suggestion that the blocks were fields of ripening coca, even though this narcotic shrub only grows in much lower and wetter country. Some thought the patches were just oats.

Others said they were wild flowers, sprouting where fields had been left fallow. My wife Ana wrote to say that the patches were so light that they could only be the brilliant white flower, known as ilusión in Spanish. Her suggestion was ignored, so one sunny afternoon, Ana and I decided to check out the fields first hand.

Ana con las parcelas de ilusiónAlthough the fields with the mysterious blocks are as visible as a beacon, the Bolivian bourgeoisie are not avid hikers, and few of the city dwellers know how to get up onto the slope. We drove up one of the steep, narrow roads, peeked over a few ridges, and finally spotted the ivory-colored fields up close. It wasn’t quite like finding Machu Picchu, but it was delightful to see five little plots of ilusión.

Called ‚Äúbaby‚Äôs breath‚ÄĚ in English, this hardy flower (Gypsophila muralis) is a native of northern Europe and Siberia, but has adapted well to the Andes, where it has become a poor person‚Äôs commercial crop. Baby‚Äôs breath has few pests and thrives on poor, stony soil. It is a low-input, low profit crop: a cheap flower that is complements and enhances bouquets of roses. A mourner with just a few spare pesos can buy a handful baby‚Äôs breath to take to a funeral.

The fields were surprisingly small, each just a few meters wide. They made up no more than a hectare all together. There were no houses near the fields, which were being tended by some absentee, peri-urban farmer, who trusted the isolated spot to keep his or her flowers hidden in plain sight, much to the bewilderment of the townsfolk below.  Every crop whether food, fiber or flower has its own signature color. A person who knows and loves plants can spot the difference between illusion and reality from miles away.

CUANDO LA ILUSI√ďN SE VUELVE REALIDAD

Por Jeff Bentley

30 de abril del 2017

Cuando aparecieron cinco bloques, más o menos rectangulares en el cerro arriba de Cochabamba, me supuse que eran parcelas de avena. El tono verde claro parecía más o menos el del grano plumoso, y el clima fresco era ideal para la avena.

oat fieldsGracias a los medios sociales, los cuadraditos en la ladera pronto se volvieron un misterio. Los cochabambinos empezaron a escribir a una p√°gina web popular para preguntar qu√© eran las formas extra√Īas. Algunos se apuraron con respuestas. Hab√≠a hasta una soluci√≥n equivocad√≠sima que los bloques eran parcelas de coca, a pesar de que el arbusto narc√≥tico solo crece en zonas mucho m√°s bajas y h√ļmedas. Algunos s√≠ pensaron que las peque√Īas mantas eran avena.

Otros dijeron que eran flores silvestres, que nacieron donde las chacras se habían dejado en descanso. Mi esposa Ana escribió diciendo que las formas eran tan pálidas que solo podrían ser la brillante flor blanca, conocida como ilusión. Nadie hizo caso a su sugerencia; así que una tarde asoleada, con Ana decidimos descubrir las chacras de cerca.

Ana con las parcelas de ilusiónA pesar de que los bloques misteriosos son tan visibles como un faro, la burguesía boliviana no es muy fanática de las caminatas en el monte, y pocos de los citadinos sabían llegar a la falda de la serranía. En el auto subimos unos caminos angostos e inclinados, echamos un vistazo sobre algunos filos y al fin vimos de cerca los campos color de marfil. No era exactamente como encontrar Machu Picchu, pero nos encantó ver a las cinco parcelitas de ilusión.

La ilusión (Gypsophila muralis) parece delicada, pero en realidad, es un robusto nativo del norte de Europa y de Siberia, que se ha adaptado bien a los Andes, donde se ha convertido en un cultivo comercial de los pobres. La ilusión tiene pocas plagas y prospera en el suelo pobre y rocoso. Es un cultivo de baja inversión y baja rentabilidad: una flor barata que complementa y enriquece hasta a un ramo de rosas. Una persona que solo tiene dos o tres pesos en el bolsillo puede mostrar su respeto al muerto, llevando un ramito de ilusión al entierro.

Nos sorprendi√≥ que las chacras fueran tan peque√Īas, unos pocos metros de ancho cada una. Las cinco no sumaron a m√°s de una hect√°rea. No hab√≠a ninguna casa cerca de las parcelas, que eran cultivadas por alg√ļn agricultor peri-urbano pero ausente, que confiaba en el lugar aislado para proteger a sus flores, escondidas en plena vista, desconcertando a los vecinos de la ciudad en el piso del valle. Cada cultivo, bien sea alimento, fibra o flor tiene su propio color √ļnico. Una persona que conoce y ama las plantas puede ver la diferencia entre ilusi√≥n y realidad a kil√≥metros de distancia.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

What do earthworms want? April 16th, 2017 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Even seemingly simple tasks, like raising the humble earthworm, can be done in more ways than one, however all variations must follow certain basic principles.

In a video from Bangladesh, villagers show the audience how to raise earthworms in cement rings, sunk into the soil. The floor is covered with a sheet of plastic to keep the worms from escaping. The worms are fed on chunks of banana corm and the ring is covered to keep out the rain, but still retain some moisture.

My grandfather used to raise worms in a pressed-board box on his back porch. He fed them on strips of newspaper and used coffee grounds. So I knew that there was more than one way to raise worms, but I didn‚Äôt quite realize how many options there were, until I saw two small, family firms in Cochabamba, Bolivia this week at an agricultural fair. Both firms raise earthworms and sell the worms, the humus they make, and the excess moisture collected in the process (to use as fertilizer‚ÄĒapplied on leaves or the soil).

mitt full of earthwormsOne company, Biodel, experimented with various types of containers. The worms died in plastic ones, but they thrived inside of aluminum cylinders, wrapped in foam (to keep them cool) inside of a metal barrel. A screened base with a tray collects the humus, while worm food (especially composted cow manure) is loaded into the top of the barrel.

worm rackA second company, Lombriflor, had a different devise. They use stacks of plastic-covered wooden trays on a slight slant, and they feed the earthworms corn plant residues, semi-composed cow manure, and kitchen scraps. Earthworms have their favorite foods. ‚ÄúEarthworms like all of the cucurbits (like squash), but nothing sour,‚ÄĚ explained Silvio Guti√©rrez and his wife, the company owners. ‚ÄúThey don‚Äôt like citrus at all.‚ÄĚ Earthworms will eat paper, but they prefer egg cartons.

So here we have a Bangladeshi cement ring, a Bolivian barrel and a set of wooden trays. It seems like a lot of different ways to raise worms, which is an important topic, because the night-crawlers, as my grandfather used to call them, help to enrich the compost, stabilize it and they improve the soil with the beneficial micro-organisms they release.

All of these worm brooders share certain core principles. The worms are kept cool, not allowed to escape, and are fed on organic matter (depending on what is abundant locally) and the earthworms are not allowed to get too dry or too moist.

The Bangladeshi earthworm video has been translated into Spanish and will soon be released in Bolivia. We hope it will inspire smallholder farmers to invent additional devices for raising the under-rated earthworm.

The Access Agriculture video-sharing platform will soon also host yet another video about rearing worms, featuring rural entrepreneurs in India who use woven polythene bags as containers.

Watch the video

The wonder of earthworms

¬ŅQU√Č QUIEREN LAS LOMBRICES DE TIERRA?

Por Jeff Bentley, 16 de abril del 2017

Hasta tareas aparentemente sencillas como criar a la humilde lombriz de tierra, pueden hacerse en m√°s de una forma, aunque todas las variantes deben seguir ciertos principios b√°sicos.

En un video de Bangladesh, los aldeanos muestran a la audiencia cómo criar las lombrices de tierra en argollas de cemento, semi-enterrados en el suelo. El piso se cubre con una hoja de plástico, para que las lombrices no escapen. Las lombrices comen pedacitos de tallos de plátano y la argolla se cubre, para que las lombrices no se ahoguen con la lluvia, pero que no se resequen tampoco.

Mi abuelo sol√≠a criar lombrices en una caja de tablas de aserr√≠n prensado en el corredor de su casa. Les alimentaba con tiras de peri√≥dico y borras de caf√©. As√≠ que yo ya sab√≠a de m√°s de una manera de criar lombrices, pero no me di cuenta de cu√°ntas opciones hab√≠a, hasta ver dos peque√Īas empresas familiares en Cochabamba, Bolivia esta semana en una feria agr√≠cola. Ambas empresas cr√≠an lombrices y las venden junto con el humus que hacen y el l√≠quido que se recolecta en el proceso (para usar como fertilizante‚ÄĒaplicado a las hojas o al suelo).

mitt full of earthwormsUna empresa, Biodel, experimentó con varias clases de contenedores. Las lombrices se morían en los de plástico, pero prosperaban en los cilindros de aluminio, forrados en espuma (para mantener la frescura) dentro de un barril metálico. Una base de malla con una charola recolecta el humus, mientras la comida de lombrices (especialmente estiércol de vaca compostada) se pone a la parte superior del barril.

worm rackUna segunda compa√Ī√≠a, Lombriflor, tiene otro dispositivo. Ellos usan bandejas de madera, una encima de la otra, livianamente inclinadas y cubiertas de pl√°stico, y alimentan a las lombrices con residuos de plantas de ma√≠z, esti√©rcol de vaca semi-compostada, y restos de cocina. Las lombrices tienen sus comidas favoritas. ‚ÄúA las lombrices les gustan todas las cuc√ļrbitas (como el zapallo), pero nada √°cido,‚ÄĚ explic√≥ Silvio Guti√©rrez y su esposa, los due√Īos de la empresa. ‚ÄúNo les gustan los c√≠tricos para nada.‚ÄĚ Las lombrices comer√°n papel, pero prefieren maples de huevo.

Así que tenemos una argolla de cemento bangladesí, un barril boliviano y un juego de bandejas de madera. Parecen muchas maneras para criar lombrices, lo cual es un tema importante, porque las lombrices ayudan a enriquecer el compost, estabilizarlo y mejoran el suelo con los micro-organismos benéficos que liberan.

Todos estos criaderos de lombrices comparten ciertos principios de fondo. Las lombrices se mantienen frescas, no pueden escapar, y se les alimenta con materia orgánica (lo que esté localmente abundante) y a las lombrices no se les deja mojarse mucho ni secarse demasiado.

El video de Bangladesh sobre la lombriz de tierra se ha traducido al espa√Īol y pronto ser√° distribuido en Bolivia. Esperamos que ello inspire a muchos campesinos a inventar otras herramientas adicionales para criar a la subestimada lombriz.

La plataforma para compartir videos, Access Agriculture, pronto albergar√° otro video sobre la crianza de lombrices de tierra, presentando a empresarios rurales en la India quienes usan gangochos (sacos de yute pl√°stico) como sus contenedores.

Ver el video

La maravillosa lombriz de tierra

Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The best knowledge is local and scientific April 2nd, 2017 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n.

Scientific knowledge is universal, but experienced agricultural scientists also bring their own, personal experience to bear on local problems.

Every year our guava tree loses all its fruit to fruit flies. A few weeks ago in Cochabamba my wife, Ana, sent me down to the agro-supply shop to get a special device, a pheromone trap, which lures fruit flies to their death using the scent of a sexual attractant. Insects use chemicals called pheromones to communicate with members of their own species. Some pheromones are emitted by a female fly that is ready to mate, but there are also alarm pheromones and aggregation pheromones (which you have seen in play, if you have ever noticed a large cluster of ladybird beetles clinging to a branch).

Ana was inspired to use the pheromone trap after having watched some training videos from Africa on the Access Agriculture website.

At the shop, the vendor said that ‚Äúyou get those traps at Proinpa.‚ÄĚ I was a little surprised that she even knew of pheromone traps, but even more so that she knew of Proinpa: not everyone is aware of nearby agricultural research institutes.

At Proinpa, Luis Crespo, an entomologist, asked us why we wanted a pheromone trap. When Ana said for guava, Luis gave us a sad, knowing smile, as if to say ‚Äúlost cause.‚ÄĚ

‚ÄúBut the trap also works for fruit flies attacking peaches?‚ÄĚ Ana added.

Luis said yes, but fruit flies prefer guava so much that he advises peach growers to cut down any guava trees, or the peaches will be ruined by flies emerging from the guavas.

Luis took us to his lab, where he piqued our interest in the food bait trap, as an alternative to the pheromone trap. He took a plastic soda-pop bottle and cut three small doors in it, to let in the fruit flies. ‚ÄúFill the bottom of the bottle with a sweet liquid. The best one is fermented chicha.‚ÄĚ Luis smiled at the thought that fruit flies liked the traditional maize beer. The flies are attracted to the liquid bait in the bottom of the bottle and drown.

The Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) is native to Europe, but it is now widespread in South America. There are also fruit flies that are native to the Americas (Anastrepha spp.).

Unlike the pheromone trap, the food bait trap would catch both species of fruit fly, males and females, as well as houseflies, ‚Äúand even wasps and bees,‚ÄĚ Luis added with a touch of sadness. Entomologists like wasps, because they kill insect pests.

Luis Crespo with pheromone trapOn the other hand, Luis explained, when the food bait trap is full of dead insects, don’t pour it on the ground or the sugary liquid will attract fruit flies, and you will feed them instead of killing them.

Luis went on to explain that when wormy fruit falls to the ground, the fruit fly larvae pupate in the soil. So you have to gather up the fallen fruits immediately.

trampa de feromonasEven though Luis prefers food bait traps, which can be made entirely from local materials, he was kind enough to sell us a wax plug of imported pheromone bait as well. Luis took a wire and a pair of pliers and with a practiced hand, poked the wire through the bait and fashioned the wire into a little hook, so we could hang it inside the pheromone trap. Then he gave us the little triangular (delta) trap; the male, Mediterranean fruit flies will fly to the little plug of sex bait, but will be captured and die on the sticky floor of the trap.

Ana and I left pleased. We had three ideas: two kinds of traps and a renewed determination to clean up the fallen fruit. And if that didn’t work, we could always cut down our guava tree and plant an avocado tree in its place.

I remembered from earlier visits that Luis knew everything there was to know about potato pests, like weevils and moths. I was delighted to see that he was also an expert on fruit flies. Local knowledge and scientific knowledge are often seen as opposites, but at their best they are complimentary. A good agricultural scientist combines textbook knowledge with local experience to unravel the ties between peach trees and guava, the various species of flies, and the advantages of different traps for fruit flies.

Watch the videos

Integrated approach against fruit flies

Killing fruit flies with food baits

Collecting fallen fruit against fruit flies

Mass trapping of fruit flies

Weaver ants against fruit flies

EL MEJOR CONOCIMIENTO ES LOCAL Y CIENT√ćFICO

por Jeff Bentley, 2 de abril del 2017

El conocimiento científico es universal, pero los experimentados científicos agrícolas también usan su propia experiencia para solucionar los problemas locales.

Cada a√Īo nuestro guayabero pierde toda su fruta a las moscas de la fruta. Hace unas semanas en Cochabamba mi esposa Ana me mand√≥ a la tienda agropecuaria para comprar un aparato especial, una trampa de feromonas que llama a las moscas de fruta a su muerte, usando un atrayente sexual. Los insectos usan qu√≠micos llamados feromonas para comunicarse con miembros de su propia especie. Algunas feromonas son emitidas por una mosca hembra que est√° lista para la c√≥pula, pero hay tambi√©n feromonas de alarma y de agregaci√≥n (las cuales usted tal vez ha visto en acci√≥n, si alguna vez se ha fijado en un gran grupo de mariquitas aferr√°ndose a una rama).

Ana se inspiró a usar la trampa de feromonas después de ver algunos videos didácticos de Africa en el sitio web de Access Agriculture.

En la tienda, la vendedora dijo ‚Äúse consiguen esas trampas en Proinpa.‚ÄĚ Me sorprendi√≥ que ella supiera de las trampas de feromona, y m√°s todav√≠a que ella conoc√≠a a Proinpa: no todos se dan cuenta de los institutos de investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola en su zona.

En Proinpa, el Ing. Luis Crespo, entom√≥logo, nos pregunt√≥ por qu√© quer√≠amos una trampa de feromona. Cuando Ana dijo para el guayabero, Luis nos dio una sonrisa triste, como decir ‚Äúcausa perdida.‚ÄĚ

‚Äú¬ŅPero la trampa tambi√©n funciona para moscas de la fruta que atacan a los durazneros?‚ÄĚ Ana agreg√≥.

Luis dijo que sí, pero que las moscas de la fruta prefieren tanto a la guayaba que él asesora a los productores de durazno a quitar todos sus guayaberos, caso contrario los duraznos serán arruinados por las moscas que emergen de las guayabas.

Luis nos llev√≥ a su laboratorio, donde nos interes√≥ en la trampa con atrayente alimenticio, como alternativa a la trampa de feromona. Tom√≥ un envase pl√°stico de refresco y cort√≥ tres peque√Īas puertas, para dejar entrar las moscas de la fruta. ‚ÄúHay que llenar el fondo con cualquier l√≠quido dulce. Lo mejor es la chicha fermentada.‚ÄĚ Luis sonri√≥ al pensar que a las moscas de la fruta les gusta la tradicional cerveza de ma√≠z. Las moscas se atraen al anzuelo l√≠quido al fondo de la botella y all√≠ se ahogan.

La mosca mediterránea (Ceratitis capitata) es nativa a Europa, pero hoy en día está difundida por Sudamérica. Hay también moscas de la fruta nativas a las Américas (Anastrepha spp.).

A diferencia de la trampa de feromonas, la trampa alimenticia atrapar√≠a a ambas especies de mosca de la fruta, tanto machos como hembras, y moscas dom√©sticas, ‚Äúy hasta avispas y abejas,‚ÄĚ Luis agreg√≥ con un toque de tristeza. A los entom√≥logos les gustan las avispas porque matan a las plagas insectiles.

Luis Crespo with pheromone trapPor otro lado, explicó Luis, cuando la trampa alimenticia está llena de insectos muertos, no botes el contenido al suelo porque el líquido dulce atraerá a las moscas de la fruta, y las alimentarás en vez de matarlas.

Luis siguió explicando que cuando la fruta agusanada cae, las moscas de la fruta se empupan en el suelo. Hay que eliminar toda la fruta caída inmediatamente.

trampa de feromonasA pesar de que Luis prefiere las trampas alimenticias, que se pueden hacer de materiales locales, amablemente nos vendió un tapón de cera, con feromonas. Luis tomó un alambre y alicate y con una mano experta, pasó el alambre a través del tapón y formó el alambre como ganchito, para que lo pudiéramos colgar dentro de la trampa de feromona. Luego nos dio una trampita triangular (trampa delta); los machos de la mosca mediterránea irán volando al corcho impregnado de olor a sexo, pero serán capturados y morirán en el piso pegajoso de la trampa.

Ana y yo nos fuimos contentos. Teníamos tres ideas: dos clases de trampas y una determinación renovada de limpiar la fruta caída. Y si eso no funcionaba, siempre podríamos despachar nuestra guayabera y plantar un palto (aguacate) en su lugar.

Me acordé de mis anteriores visitas que Luis lo sabía todo de las plagas de la papa, como gorgojos y polillas. Me encantó ver que también era experto en las moscas de la futa. El conocimiento local y el científico a menudo se ven como opuestos, pero en el mejor de los casos se complementan. Un buen científico agrícola combina el conocimiento de los textos con la experiencia local para entender la relación entre los durazneros y los guayaberos, las diferentes especies de moscas, y las ventajas de las diferentes trampas para las moscas de la fruta.

Vea los videos

Integrated approach against fruit flies

Killing fruit flies with food baits

Collecting fallen fruit against fruit flies

Mass trapping of fruit flies

Weaver ants against fruit flies

Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Design by Olean webdesign