WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

200 Guinea pigs August 7th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Paul and Marcella and I recently met Lucía Ávila in Quilcas, a small town in Junín, Peru. After 2013, agronomists from an NGO, Yanapai, began to show her and her neighbors how to raise a mix of fodders, including rye grass, alfalfa, clover and others. Animals like the mix more than just one fodder, but the plants need water. With support from the government of Peru, the farmers of Quilcas dug an irrigation canal from some 7 km away, and the people began growing small patches of fodder which they could cut for several years, fertilizing it with ash and manure until the grass aged. Then the fodder patch would be dug up, and planted in potatoes, which prospered in the soil where the grass had been grown.

Every day, doña Lucía has been able to cut two large blankets full of fodder, enough for a milk cow, or in her case, enough for 200 guinea pigs.

Doña Lucía had started cautiously. In 2014 she got her first pair of guinea pigs from an NGO called CEDAL. The rodents reproduce pretty fast, so she soon had dozens of the animals. Every year she gets some new males, to avoid inbreeding. She specializes in a large, meaty breed called Mi Perú (my Peru), which is white and reddish, like the Peruvian flag.

As doña Lucía explains, guinea pigs are easy to sell, so they give her a steady income. Plenty of customers come to her house, and she sells the guinea pigs for 20 soles (over $5). She now has 200 guinea pigs.

She says that before she got the big, red-and-white guinea pigs, she had some other which she describes as “small, like rats, and the color of rats.” She adds “When you have grass you can have nice, fat guinea pigs, and you can sell them and have a little money. You can improve your standard of living.” While guinea pigs are thought of as pets in many northern countries, in places like Peru they are small livestock. They are easy to raise at home, in the courtyard, under the shade of a porch.

Formal development is often criticized as being prone to failure. So, it’s only fair to recognize its successes. In this case, three different projects happened to come together from different institutions to ensure that people not only had fodder, but water to irrigate it, and guinea pigs to eat it. The innovations worked together, even if they weren’t designed that way.

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one, was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca and colleagues of the Grupo Yanapai for introducing us to Quilcas and for sharing their knowledge with us. Raúl Ccanto and Paul Van Mele read and made valuable comments on an earlier version of this story.

200 CUYES

Jeff Bentley, 24 de julio del 2022

Hace poco, Paul, Marcella y yo conocimos a Lucía Ávila en Quilcas, un pequeño pueblo de Junín, Perú. A partir de 2013, los agrónomos de una ONG, Yanapai, empezaron a enseñarle a ella y a sus vecinos cómo sembrar una mezcla de forrajes, que incluye ray gras, alfalfa, trébol y otros. A los animales les gusta más la mezcla que un solo forraje, pero las plantas necesitan agua. Con el apoyo del gobierno de Perú, los campesinos de Quilcas cavaron un canal de riego a unos 7 km de distancia, y la gente empezó a cultivar pequeñas parcelas de 200 metros cuadrados, que podían cortar durante varios años, abonándolas con ceniza y estiércol hasta que la hierba envejeciera, y se pudiera desenterrar, plantando papas, que prosperaron en la tierra donde había crecido la hierba.

Doña Lucía descubrió que cada día podía cortar dos grandes mantas llenas de forraje, suficiente para una vaca lechera, o en su caso, suficiente para 200 cuyes.

Doña Lucía había empezado con cautela. En 2014 consiguió su primer par de cuyes de una ONG llamada CEDAL. Los roedores se reproducen bastante rápido, así que pronto tuvo decenas de estos animales. Cada año consigue algunos machos nuevos, para evitar cruzar animales parientes. Está especializada en una raza grande y carnosa llamada Mi Perú, que es blanca y rojiza, como la bandera peruana.

Como explica doña Lucía, los cuyes son fáciles de vender, por lo que le dan unos ingresos constantes. A su casa llegan muchos clientes y vende los cuyes a 20 soles (más de 5 dólares). Ahora tiene 200 cuyes.

Dice que antes de tener los cuyes grandes, rojos y blancos, tenía otros que describe como “pequeños, como ratas, y del color de las ratas”. Añade: “Cuando tienes pasto puedes tener cuyes bonitas y gordas, y puedes venderlas y tener un poco de dinero. Puedes mejorar tu nivel de vida”. Mientras que en muchos países del norte se considera a los cuyes como mascotas, en lugares como Perú son ganado menor. Viven en el corredor de la casa de la gente, y son fáciles de criar.

A menudo se critica el desarrollo formal por siempre fracasar. Es importante reconocer también sus éxitos. En este caso, se unieron varios esfuerzos para garantizar que la gente no sólo tuviera forraje, sino también agua para regarlo y cuyes para alimentarlos. Las innovaciones funcionaron conjuntamente, aún si no se diseñaron juntos.

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos, incluso este, fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca y colegas del Grupo Yanapai por presentarnos a Quilcas y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros. Raúl Ccanto y Paul Van Mele hicieron comentarios valiosos sobre una versión previa de este relato.

Get in the picture July 17th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

For over 100 years, anthropologists have used a technique called “participant observation” to figure out what life is really like in small communities. From the Trobriand Islands to New Mexico, this has been the gold standard of ethnographic research. In the past few years, development workers have been trying to use the method, often misunderstanding it, for example, brief encounters in workshops.

Using participant observation ideally means joining in what the people themselves are doing (gardening, dancing, holding ceremonies): observing all the while, and sooner or later taking notes. Then, by sleight of hand, the anthropologists write themselves out of the picture for the final draft.

As Paul said in a recent blog (Mother and calf), on filming assignments, he and I often stay behind the camera while Marcella films. Staying out of the shot often means not joining people in their activities, but recently we had the luxury of getting in the picture.

The students and teachers of the Tres de Mayo school in Huayllacayán, Huánuco, Peru, were planting a garden. They weren’t quite ready to plant it, since they had only reopened the school (following the Covid lockdown) two months earlier, and they had just devoted some energy to their agrobiodiversity fair, which we recently wrote about (A good school).

But by 8AM on 5 May, the students and teachers were busy digging up a large garden plot. Paul paced it out at 75 square meters (big enough for a suburban front lawn). One of the teachers, Mr. Serafín, sang little songs and shouted encouragement to the children. It takes a while to plant such a large garden, even with 20 people helping, so Paul and I decided we could help out, and we would be spread thin enough that Marcella could still manage to edit us out of the final footage for our video.

Paul and I both like to garden, so he grabbed a pick and began turning over the soil, getting a good work out. Paul looked like he was moving earth quickly. Then one of the dads joined, and without saying a word, Paul saw that with certain small movements of the pick, the work could be done faster and with less effort.

Another parent farmer picked up an Andean foot plow, and impressed Paul with the size of the chunks of earth he was rapidly breaking off from the dried crust of soil. Much of local knowledge is like this. It can only be appreciated by joining in. You can’t just talk about it, because you don’t always know what people mean until you work alongside them.

I pitched in, too. Later one of the teachers told me, “You’re covered in dirt,” as though reproaching a child. Country people know how to work all day without getting their clothes filthy.

Within two hours, the field had been prepared, and the cabbage, lettuce and broccoli had been planted and was being gently watered. The children had learned not only how to plant a garden, for self-sufficiency, and healthy eating, but they had also seen that the real experts were their own parents who knew better than the teachers or the visiting film crew.

When outsiders make rural people “participate” in unfamiliar activities (often involving writing or drawing), the locals can seem a bit uncomfortable. But when we take part in their activities, we can appreciate how competent these smallholders are.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

The school garden

The chaquitaclla

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one with the 3 de Mayo school, was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Dante Flores of the Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) and to Aldo Cruz of the Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas Áridas (CIZA) for introducing us to the community and for sharing their knowledge with us.

CUANDO TE METES EN LA FOTO

Jeff Bentley, 17 de julio del 2022

Durante más de 100 años, los antropólogos han usado una técnica llamada “observación participante” para averiguar cómo es realmente la vida en las pequeñas comunidades. Desde las Islas Trobriand hasta Nuevo México, ésta ha sido la norma de oro de la investigación etnográfica. En los últimos años, los expertos en el desarrollo han intentado usar el método, a menudo sin entenderlo, por ejemplo, invitando la gente local a talleres.

Usar la observación participante significa, idealmente, participar en lo que hace la gente (jardinería, bailes, celebración de ceremonias): observar todo el tiempo y, tarde o temprano, tomar notas. Luego, mágicamente los antropólogos se borran a sí mismos del texto final.

Como decía Paul en un blog reciente (Mother and calf), cuando trabajamos en la filmación de un video, él y yo solemos quedarnos detrás de la cámara mientras Marcella filma. Quedarse fuera de la toma a menudo significa no unirse a la gente en sus actividades, pero recientemente nos dimos el lujo de salir en la foto.

Los alumnos y profesores de la escuela Tres de Mayo de Huayllacayán, Huánuco, Perú, estaban sembrando un jardín. No estaban del todo preparados para sembrarlo, ya que sólo habían reabierto el colegio (tras el cierre de Covid) dos meses antes, y acababan de dedicar algo de energía a su feria de agrobiodiversidad, sobre la que escribimos recientemente (Una buena escuela).

Pero a las 8 de la mañana del 5 de mayo, los alumnos y los profesores estaban metidos a preparar un gran huerto. Paul lo calculó en 75 metros cuadrados (el tamaño de un césped grande en un barrio caro). El profesor, el Sr. Serafín, cantaba pequeñas canciones y animaba a los niños con gritos chistosos. Lleva un tiempo plantar un jardín tan grande, incluso con 20 personas ayudando, así que Paul y yo decidimos que podríamos ayudar, y que estaríamos lo suficientemente repartidos como para que Marcella aún pudiera editarnos fuera de las imágenes finales para nuestro vídeo.

A Paul y a mí nos gusta la jardinería, así que él cogió una picota y empezó a remover la tierra, haciendo un buen trabajo. Paul movía la tierra rápidamente. Entonces se unió uno de los padres, y sin decir una palabra, le quedó claro a Paul que, con ciertos pequeños movimientos del pico, el trabajo se podía hacer más rápido y con menos esfuerzo.

Otro padre agricultor cogió una chaquitaclla, e impresionó a Paul con el tamaño de los trozos de tierra que desprendía rápidamente de la superficie de tierra seca. Gran parte del conocimiento local es así. Sólo se puede apreciar si se participa en él. No puedes limitarte a hablar de ello, porque no siempre sabes lo que la gente quiere decir hasta que trabajas con ellos.

Yo también colaboré. Más tarde, una de las profesoras me dijo: “Estás cubierto de tierra”, como si reprochara a un niño. La gente del campo sabe cómo trabajar todo el día sin ensuciar completamente la ropa.

En dos horas, el huerto estaba preparado, y el repollo, la lechuga y el brócoli se habían sembrado y se estaban regando suavemente. Los niños no sólo habían aprendido a sembrar un huerto, para ser autosuficientes y comer sano, sino que también habían visto que los verdaderos expertos eran sus propios padres, que sabían más que los profesores o el equipo de filmación.

Cuando los forasteros hacen que la población rural local “participe” en actividades desconocidas (que a menudo implican escribir o dibujar), los lugareños pueden parecer un poco incómodos. Pero cuando nosotros participamos en sus actividades de ellos, llegamos a apreciar lo competentes que es la gente rural.

Antes en el blog de Agro-Insight

The school garden

La chaquitaclla

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos, incluso este con la escuela, fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Dante Flores del Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) y a Aldo Cruz del Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas Áridas (CIZA) por presentarnos a la comunidad y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros.

A good school July 10th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Public schools in rural Latin America are chronically underfunded, and can have a hard time retaining teachers, who often live in cities. I had a chance not long ago to visit the small school in the community of 3 de Mayo Huayllacayán, in Huánuco. I was actually there on the 3rd of May, the community’s anniversary, and they were celebrating with a mass, football games, dancing and trout for breakfast.

The school held an “Agrobiodiversity Fair,” the first of its kind that I have seen in a school. The eight teachers (primary and secondary) cut an impressive figure in their new suits. During the morning, the children presented skits, songs and speeches about local crops, like potato, ullucus, mashwa and oca.

The mayor attended. All of the kids presented their models and drawings,  experiences that helped the young people realize that healthy food is natural food, from local crops. The fair’s stands were worked by children who showed off the many local varieties of potatoes and other tubers of all colors, and the special dishes made from them, like the pudding (mazamorra) made from tócosh (fermented potatoes).

There was a raw energy in the presentations: in one skit four children wore costumes representing native Andean root and tuber crops. The girl in the potato suit bragged that “everybody loves me.” And it’s true: even in its Andean homeland, the potato is far more popular than the other local root and tuber crops. The three children dressed as the other crops lamented “Why does no one want to eat us?” In the end, the children agreed, “We are one family, the Tubers, and we should all stick together.”

In another skit, a pre-teen wearing jeans and a baseball cap (sideways on her head) played the part of a young woman returning from the big city to visit her home village, where she met her “aunt” (impeccably played by a 12-year-old in a felt hat and a wool sweater) who asked the niece to stay for a lunch of floury potatoes and shinti (made from toasted, boiled broad beans). “That’s gross! That’s peasant food,” the city girl said, perfectly capturing the prevailing prejudices. Then the visitor fell ill, because of her city diet of fried chicken and French fries, but in the happy ending, her health was restored with natural food.

For years, rural people in Latin America have been discriminated against, for the way they speak, for their clothing, and their food. Yet at least one school in Peru is making an effort to teach kids the value of homecooked food, made from the many varieties of local crops, and to be proud of themselves.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

The school garden

The chaquitaclla

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one with the 3 de Mayo school, was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Dante Flores of the Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) and to Aldo Cruz of the Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas Áridas (CIZA) for introducing us to the community and for sharing their knowledge with us. Dante Flores and Paul Van Mele read a previous version of this blog and made valuable comments.

UNA BUENA ESCUELA

Jeff Bentley, 10 de julio del 2022

A las escuelas públicas rurales de América Latina siempre le hacen falta los fondos y es difícil retener a los profesores, que a menudo viven en las ciudades. Hace poco tuve la oportunidad de visitar la pequeña escuela de la comunidad de 3 de Mayo Huayllacayán en Huánuco. Estuve allí el 3 de mayo, aniversario de la comunidad, y lo celebraron con una misa, partidos de fútbol, bailes y un desayuno de trucha.

La escuela realizó una “Feria de la Agrobiodiversidad”, la primera de este tipo que he visto en una escuela. Los ocho profesores (de primaria y secundaria) lucieron una figura impresionante con sus nuevos trajes. Durante la mañana, los niños presentaron sociodramas, canciones y charlas sobre los cultivos locales, como la papa, el olluco, la mashwa y la oca.

El alcalde asistió. Los niños presentaron sus maquetas y dibujos, experiencias que ayudaron a los jóvenes a darse cuenta de que los alimentos sanos son naturales, hechos en base a los cultivos locales. En los stands de la feria, los niños y niñas mostraron las muchas variedades locales de papas y otros tubérculos de todos los colores, y los platos especiales que se hacen con ellos, como la mazamorra hecha con tócosh (papas fermentadas).

Las presentaciones tenían una energía viva: en una obra dramática, cuatro niños se disfrazaban de los cultivos de raíces y tubérculos andinos. La niña del disfraz de papa se jactaba de que “todo el mundo me quiere”. Y es cierto: incluso en su tierra natal andina, la papa es mucho más popular que los otros cultivos de raíces y tubérculos. Los tres niños vestidos de los otros cultivos se lamentaron: “¿Por qué nadie quiere comernos?” Al final, los niños se pusieron de acuerdo: “Somos una sola familia, los Tubérculos, y deberíamos estar todos juntos”.

En otra obra, una preadolescente vestida de jeans y gorra de béisbol (de lado en la cabeza) interpretó el papel de una joven que volvía de la gran ciudad para visitar su pueblo natal, donde se encontró con su “tía” (interpretada impecablemente por una niña de 12 años con gorro de fieltro y chompa de lana), que le pidió a la sobrina que se quedara a comer papas harinosas y shinti (hecho de habas tostadas y cocidas). “¡Qué asco! Eso es comida de campesinos”, dijo la chica de la ciudad, captando perfectamente los prejuicios dominantes. Pero luego, la visitante se enfermó, debido a su dieta citadina de pollo frito y papas fritas, pero en el final feliz, su salud se restableció con la comida natural.

Durante años, los habitantes de las zonas rurales de América Latina han sido discriminados por su forma de hablar, de vestir y de comer. Sin embargo, al menos una escuela del Perú se esfuerza por enseñar a los niños el valor de la comida casera, elaborada con las diversas variedades de cultivos locales, y a sentirse orgullosos de sí mismos.

Antes en el blog de Agro-Insight

The school garden

La chaquitaclla

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos, incluso este con la escuela, fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Dante Flores del Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) y a Aldo Cruz del Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas Áridas (CIZA) por presentarnos a la comunidad y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros. Dante Flores y Paul Van Mele leyeron una versión previa de este relato, e hizo comentarios valiosos.

 

The chaquitaclla June 26th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

When the Spanish conquered Peru, they found native people working the soil with a tool built around a long pole, called the chaquitaclla. Usually rendered into English as the “Andean foot plow,” the chaquitaclla doesn’t quite plow a furrow, but in the hands (and feet) of a skilled operator it  does neatly loosen one large block of sod at a time, which is then turned over by a helper.

We met one such person recently in the mountains of Huánuco, in the community of Tres de Mayo, Huayllacayán. Francisco Poma, a local farmer, took time off one day to demonstrate the foot plow for a group of school children.

The potato harvest was just ending, but one farmer, Eustaquio Hilario Ponciano and his family had graciously waited to harvest one small field of native potatoes, so that Paul, Marcella and I could film it.

Although it was not planting season, don Francisco and don Eustaquio next demonstrated how to plant with a chaquitaclla using a minimum tillage system called “chiwi” in which potatoes are planted without completely disturbing the soil. Don Francisco put the blade of the tool on the soil, stepped on the jaruna (foot pedal) while holding onto the uysha (the handle), and the metal blade sunk into the earth. Don Francisco turned over the chunk of soil, while don Eustaquio nestled a seed potato into the hole and then covered it up with the sod, grassy side down, patting it into place with the palms of his hands.

Modern Peru has tractors and the whole array of contemporary farm implements, but the ancient foot plow survives because it fits a purpose. It can work steep slopes, small fields, and it can reach right up to the edge of the field, taking advantage of precious land that a tractor misses.

Like any other technology, the chaquitaclla survives because it fills a function, and no better tool has yet been invented to replace it. It gently works steep, fragile soils, while keeping large chunks of earth intact.

Like other technologies, even old ones, the chaquitaclla also continues to evolve. The blade of pre-Hispanic ones were made of stone. Don Francisco explains that this one is made by a local blacksmith from a steel strip recycled from a truck’s shock absorber. The main pole of the chaquitaclla is now often made of eucalyptus, a strong, straight and light wood that was unknown to pre-Columbian Peruvians. The hand and foot holds were once tied to the main pole with llama rawhide. Sometimes they still are, but don Francisco shows me several chaquitacllas, including one tied together with nylon twine. He explained “when we leave the chaquitaclla in the field, sometimes the dogs eat the rawhide. They don’t eat this one made from synthetic twine.”

Ancient tools are kept not out of nostalgia, but because they fill a niche, and because local people adapt them, incorporating new materials into old devices.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

The school garden

The enemies of innovation

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos with farmers like don Feliciano was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Dante Flores of the Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) and to Aldo Cruz of the Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas Áridas (CIZA) for introducing us to the community and for sharing their knowledge with us. Dante Flores and Paul Van Mele read a previous version of this blog and made valuable comments.

LA CHAQUITACLLA

Jeff Bentley, 26 de junio del 2022

Cuando los españoles conquistaron al Perú, encontraron a la gente trabajando la tierra con una herramienta de madera larga llamada “chaquitaclla”, que suele traducirse al español como “arado de pie,” no llega a arar un surco, pero en manos (y pies) de un operador habiloso, afloja limpiamente un gran bloque de tierra  que luego es volteado a mano por un ayudante

Hace poco conocimos a un experto en la chaquitaclla en la sierra de Huánuco, en la comunidad de Tres de Mayo, Huayllacayán. Francisco Poma, un agricultor del lugar, se tomó un día para demostrar el arado de pie a un grupo de estudiantes de primaria.

La cosecha de papas se estaba acabando, pero un agricultor, Eustaquio Hilario Ponciano, y su familia amablemente habían esperado a cosechar una pequeña chacra de papas nativas para que Paul, Marcella y yo pudiéramos filmarles.

Aunque no era época de siembra, don Francisco y don Eustaquio demostraron a continuación cómo se siembra con una chaquitaclla en el sistema de siembra llamada “chiwi” una especie de labranza mínima que no remueve todo el terreno). Don Francisco puso la hoja de la herramienta sobre la tierra, pisó la jaruna (pedal) mientras se sujetaba a la uysha (la agarradera), y la punta metálica se hundió en la tierra. Don Francisco volcó el terrón, mientras que don Eustaquio metió una papa semilla en el hoyo y luego la cubrió con el pedazo de tierra, dándole golpecitos con las palmas de las manos.

El Perú moderno tiene tractores y todos los implementos agrícolas contemporáneos, pero el antiguo arado de pie sobrevive porque tiene un propósito. Puede trabajar en laderas empinadas, en campos pequeños y puede preparar hasta el borde de la chacra, aprovechando el espacio mejor que un tractor.

Como cualquier otra tecnología, la chaquitaclla sobrevive porque cumple una función, y todavía no se ha inventado ninguna herramienta mejor para sustituirla. Trabaja suavemente los suelos inclinados y frágiles, manteniendo intactos grandes trozos de tierra.

Como otras tecnologías, incluso las más antiguas, la chaquitaclla también sigue evolucionando. En tiempos prehispánicos, la punta era de piedra. Don Francisco explica que la suya la ha fabricado un herrero local con acero reciclado de un muelle de camión. Hoy en día el palo principal de la chaquitaclla se hace de eucalipto, una madera fuerte, recta y ligera que era desconocida para los peruanos precolombinos. La jaruna y la uysha se ataban al palo con cuero crudo de llama. A veces todavía lo están, pero don Francisco me muestra varias chaquitacllas, incluida una atada con hilo de nylon. Me explica que “cuando dejamos la chaquitaclla en el campo, a veces los perros se comen el cuero. No se comen esta, hecha con cuerda sintética”.

Las herramientas antiguas se conservan no por nostalgia, sino porque funcionan, y porque la gente local las adapta, incorporando nuevos materiales a los dispositivos antiguos.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

The school garden

The enemies of innovation

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos agricultor-a-agricultor con agricultores como don Feliciano fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Dante Flores del Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) y a Aldo Cruz del Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas Áridas (CIZA) por presentarnos a la comunidad y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros. Dante Flores y Paul Van Mele leyeron una versión previa de este relato, e hizo comentarios valiosos.

A better way to make holes June 12th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Eleven heads think better than one, as I saw recently in the northern Andes. While filming a video with Paul and Marcella, local people in Ancash, Peru were telling us that they plant pasture seed by “making a hole” and sprinkling in some grass seed and a bit of composted manure. It sounded pretty mundane until I saw someone do it.

Local livestock owners, Feliciano Cruz and Estela Balabarca, took us to see them plant grass in their pasture. Don Feliciano grabbed what looked like a pick, swung it into the ground and pulled up a perfect, fist-sized plug of sod. With a practiced hand, he moved quickly across the pasture, swinging his pick, with lumps of sod flying over his shoulder. In a second or two he could make a perfect, round hole about three inches deep (10 cm).

Doña Estela sprinkled some dry manure into the hole, and added a bit of rye grass seed she had harvested herself, and that was it. The seed wasn’t buried, but enough earth fell in from the sides of the hole to gently cover it.

When the seed sprouts at the bottom of its little hole, it is protected from the wind and animals, but will let in the rain water. Don Feliciano calls his invention the sacabocada (bite-taker), because it takes little bites out of the soil. He designed it to have a way to plant improved fodder grass without plowing the soil.

In a previous blog (The committee of the commons) I mentioned the CIAL, a committee for local, farmer experimenters. I asked don Feliciano how he invented the bite-taker. He said that in the CIAL, they realized that they need to avoid plowing, to conserve the soil. So, they designed a tool, based on the pick, but it made a big crack in the earth, and it did not release the clod. So the CIAL members kept talking about how to improve the bite-taker.

Don Feliciano said these discussions were “almost like a game,” until they came up with the idea of welding a short tube to a pick head. That design worked. The CIAL got the municipality to fund them to make 25 copies for 25 soles (about $6) each. Don Feliciano is not sure how many people use the bite-taker, but we did hear about the technique from at least one other community member.

The CIAL itself was an innovation, created by a team in Colombia, to bring together farmers and agronomists to dream up fresh ideas. The CIAL reached this corner of Peru through Vidal Rondán, an adult educator who read about the farmer committee, and contacted its creators for advice. He organized several of the CIALs. Nearly 25 years later, this community of farmers in the northern Peruvian Andes is still using the CIALs as a way to bring people together to stimulate creative thought.

In agricultural development, useful ideas, like CIALs, tend to blossom and then die, instead of evolving. This is partly because it is more rewarding to think of new tools and give them cool names than to tinker with an old concept. Like the bite-taker, the CIAL may have deserved a wider application than it got. But then, the bite-taker and the CIAL are both still available to be dusted off, or to provide inspiration for the next Big Idea.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The committee of the commons

Moveable pasture

Further reading

Ashby, Jacqueline Anne 2000 Investing in farmers as researchers: Experience with local agricultural research committees in Latin America. Cali, Colombia: CIAT.

Video on another idea for research in rural communities

Succeed with seeds

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos with farmers like don Feliciano was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Vidal Rondán of the Mountain Institute for introducing us to the community.

MEJORES AGUJEROS PARA SEMBRAR PASTO

Jeff Bentley, 12 de junio del 2023

Once cabezas piensan mejor que una, como confirmé hace poco en el norte de los Andes. Mientras grabábamos un video con Paul y Marcella, la gente de Ancash (Perú) nos contaba que ellos sembraban los pastos “haciendo un hueco” y echando algunas semillas de pasto y un poco de estiércol compostado. Sonaba bastante mundano hasta que vi a alguien hacerlo.

Los ganaderos locales, Feliciano Cruz y Estela Balabarca, nos llevaron a ver cómo sembraban el pasto. Don Feliciano agarró lo que parecía una picota, la clavó en la tierra y sacó un tapón de césped, del tamaño de un puño. Con una mano experta, se movió rápidamente sobre el pasto, moviendo la picota de arriba para abajo, con trozos de césped volando sobre su hombro. En un segundo o dos pudo hacer un agujero perfecto y redondo de unos 10 cm de profundidad.

Doña Estela esparció un poco de estiércol seco en el agujero y añadió un poco de semilla de ray gras que ella misma había cosechado, y eso fue todo. La semilla no se enterró, pero cayó suficiente tierra por los lados del agujero para cubrirla ligeramente.

Cuando la semilla brota en el fondo de su agujerito, queda protegida del viento y de los animales, pero deja entrar el agua de la lluvia. Don Feliciano llama a su invento la sacabocada, porque saca pequeñas bocadas de la tierra. Lo diseñó para poder sembrar pasto forrajero mejorado sin arar la tierra.

En un blog anterior (Comité campesino) mencioné el CIAL, un comité de experimentadores locales y campesinos. Le pregunté a don Feliciano cómo había inventado la sacabocada. Me dijo que en el CIAL se dieron cuenta de que necesitaban evitar arar el suelo, para conservarlo. Así que diseñaron una herramienta, basada en el pico, pero que hacía una gran grieta en la tierra, y no soltaba el terrón. Así que los miembros del CIAL siguieron hablando de cómo mejorar la sacabocada.

Don Feliciano dijo que estas discusiones eran “casi como un juego”, hasta que se les ocurrió soldar un tubo corto a la cabeza de la picota. Ese diseño funcionó. El CIAL consiguió que la municipalidad les financiara la fabricación de 25 ejemplares por 25 soles (unos 6 dólares) cada uno. Don Feliciano no está seguro de cuántas personas usan la sacabocada, pero nos enteramos de la técnica por al menos otro miembro de la comunidad.

El CIAL en sí mismo fue una innovación, creada por un equipo de Colombia, para reunir a agricultores y agrónomos con el fin de experimentar con nuevas ideas. El CIAL llegó a este rincón de Perú a través de Vidal Rondán, un educador de adultos que leyó sobre el comité de agricultores y se puso en contacto con sus creadores para pedirles consejo. Él organizó varios de los CIALes. Casi 25 años después, esta comunidad de agricultores del norte de los Andes peruanos sigue usando los CIALes como forma de reunir a la gente para estimular el pensamiento creativo.

En el desarrollo agrícola, las ideas útiles, como los CIAL, tienden a florecer y luego morir, en vez de evolucionarse. Esto se debe, en parte, a que es más gratificante pensar en nuevas herramientas y darles nombres atractivos que retocar un concepto antiguo. Al igual que la sacabocada, el CIAL podría haber merecido una aplicación más amplia de la que tuvo. Pero tanto la sacabocada como el CIAL siguen estando disponibles para ser desempolvados, o para servir de inspiración para la próxima Gran Idea.

Otros blogs de Agro-Insight

Comité campesino

Pasto movible

Lectura adicional

Ashby, Jacqueline A., Ann R. Braun, Teresa Gracia, M. D. P. Guerrero, Luis Alfredo Hernández Romero, Carlos Arturo Quirós Torres, y J. A. Roa. 2001.La comunidad se organiza para hacer investigación: experiencias de los comités de investigación agrícola local, CIAL en América Latina. CIAT: Cali, Colombia

Video sobre otra idea para investigación en comunidades

Succeed with seeds

Agradecimientos

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos agricultor-a-agricultor con agricultoras como don Feliciano fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Vidal Rondán del Instituto Montaño por presentarnos a la comunidad.

 

 

 

Design by Olean webdesign