WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Proinpa: Agricultural research worth waiting for May 21st, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Agricultural research is notoriously slow. It takes years to bear fruit, and donor-funded agencies don’t always last very long. But Bolivia got lucky with one organization that survived.

It started in 1989, when the Swiss funded a project to do potato research, the Potato Research Program (Proinpa), working closely with a core staff of four scientists from the International Potato Center (CIP). Most of the other staff were young Bolivians, including many thesis students.

Ten years later, in 1998, it was time to fold up the project, but some visionary people from Proinpa, with enthusiastic support of Swiss and CIP colleagues, decided to give Proinpa a new life as a permanent agency or foundation.

By then ‚ÄúProinpa‚ÄĚ had some name-brand recognition, so they wisely kept the acronym, but changed the full name to ‚ÄúPromotion and Research of Andean Products.‚ÄĚ Proinpa‚Äôs leaders were not going to limit themselves to potatoes any more. The Swiss provided an endowment to pay for core costs, but it was not enough to run the whole organization.

Proinpa went through some rough times. When they stopped being a project, they had to give up their spacious offices in the city of Cochabamba. For a while they rented an aging building far from the city that had been used as a government rabies control center. Later, they could only afford one floor of that building. I remember being there on moving day, years ago, when they were all cramming into the smaller space, happily carrying boxes of files to squeeze together into shared offices. They were surviving.

Survival was important. Public-sector agricultural research in Bolivia was going through some rough times. The Bolivian Institute of Agricultural and Livestock Research (IBTA) closed in 1997 and its replacement died a few years later. Government agricultural research only started again In 2008, when the National Institute of Agricultural and Livestock and Forestry Innovation (INIAF) was created. During those years, Proinpa was an outstanding center for agricultural research in Bolivia, and curated priceless collections of potatoes and quinoas.

That potato seedbank was kept at Toralapa, in the countryside some 70 km from the city of Cochabamba. Over the years, Proinpa had expanded the collection from 1000 accessions to 4000. This biodiversity is the source of genetic material that plant breeders need to create new varieties. In 2010, the government, which owned the station at Toralapa, turned it over to INIAF. Proinpa worked with INIAF for a year, to ensure a stable transition, and the government of Bolivia still maintains that collection of potatoes and other Andean crops.

Proinpa recently asked me to join them for their 25th anniversary event, held at their small campus, built after 2005. The celebration started with tours of stands, where Proinpa highlighted their most important research.

Dr. Ximena Cadima, member of the Bolivian Academy of Science, explained how Proinpa has used its knowledge of local crops to breed 69 officially released new varieties, of the potato, quinoa and seven other crops. They also encouraging farmers to grow native potatoes on their farms, which is also crucial for keeping these unique crops alive.

Luis Crespo, entomologist, and Giovanna Plata, plant pathologist, explained their research to develop ecological alternatives to pest control. Luis talked about his work with insect sex pheromones. One of the many things he does is to dissect female moths and remove their scent glands, which he sends to a company in the Netherlands that isolates the sex pheromone from the glands. The company synthesizes the pheromone, makes more of it, and Proinpa uses it to bait traps. Male moths smell the pheromone, think it is a receptive female and fly to it. The frustrated males die in the trap. The females can’t lay eggs without mating, eliminating the next generation of pests before they are born.

Giovana showed us how they study the microbes that kill pathogens. She places different fungi and bacteria in petri dishes to see which microorganisms can physically displace the germs that cause crop diseases. She also isolates plant growth hormones, produced by the good microbes.

This background work on the ecology of microbes has informed Proinpa’s efforts to create a new industry of benign pest control. Jimmy Ciancas, an engineer, led us around Proinpa’s new plant, where they produce tons of beneficial bacteria and fungi to replace the chemicals that farmers use to control pests and diseases.

Proinpa also shows off the research by Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio and colleagues who are developing windbreaks of native plants and sowing wild lupines as a cover crop. This research aims to save the high Andes from the devastating erosion unleashed when the Quinoa Boom of 2010-2014 stripped away native vegetation. The soil simply blew away.

Later, we moved to Proinpa’s comfortable lunch room, which is shaded, but open to the air on three sides, perfect for Cochabamba’s climate. The place had been set up as a formal auditorium, where, for over an hour, Proinpa gave plaques to honor some of the many organizations that had helped them over the years: universities, INIAF, small-town mayors in the municipalities where Proinpa does field work. Many organizations reciprocated, giving Proinpa an award right back. Proinpa has survived because of good leadership, and because of its many friends.

In between the speeches, I got a chance to meet the man sitting next to me, Lionel Ichazo, who supervises three large, commercial farms for a food processing company in the lowlands of Eastern Bolivia. They grow soya in the summer and wheat and sorghum in the winter. Lionel confirmed what Proinpa says, that the use of natural pesticides is exploding on the low plains. Lionel uses Proinpa’s natural pesticides as a seed dressing to control disease. Lionel, who is also an agronomist and a graduate of El Zamorano, one of Latin America’s top agricultural universities (in Honduras), said that he noticed how the soil has been improving over the four years that he has used the microbes. The microorganisms were break down the crop stubble into carbon that the plants can use. Lionel added that most of the large-scale farmers are still treating their seeds with agrochemicals. But they are starting to see that the biological products work, at affordable prices, and are often even cheaper than the chemicals. Of course, the biologicals are safer to handle, and environmentally friendly. And that is key to their success. Demand is skyrocketing.

It has taken many years of research to produce environmentally-sound, biological pesticides that can convince large-scale commercial farmers to start to transition away from agrochemicals. I thought back to a time about 15 years earlier, when I saw Proinpa doing trials with farmers near Cochabamba. That was an early stage of these scientifically-sound natural products. Agricultural research is slow by nature, but like a fruit tree that takes years to mature, the wait is worth the while.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Don’t eat the peels

Commercializing organic inputs

The best knowledge is local and scientific

Recovering from the quinoa boom

Related videos

Making enriched biofertilizer

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

The wasp that protects our crops

Managing the potato tuber moth

Acknowledgements

Paul Van Mele, Graham Thiele, Rolando Oros, Jorge Blajos and Lionel Ichazo read and commented on an earlier version of this blog.

PROINPA: INVESTIGACI√ďN AGR√ćCOLA QUE VALE LA PENA ESPERAR

Jeff Bentley, 21 de mayo del 2023

La investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola es notoriamente lenta. Tarda a√Īos en dar frutos, y los programas financiados por donantes suelen durar poco tiempo. Pero Bolivia tuvo suerte con una organizaci√≥n que sobrevivi√≥.

Empezó en 1989, cuando los suizos financiaron un proyecto nuevo, el Proyecto de Investigación de la Papa (Proinpa), en colaboración con cuatro científicos del Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). Casi todo el resto del personal eran jóvenes bolivianos, entre ellos muchos tesistas.

Diez a√Īos despu√©s, en 1998, lleg√≥ el momento de cerrar el proyecto, pero algunas personas visionarias de Proinpa, con el apoyo entusiasta de colegas suizos y del CIP, decidieron dar a Proinpa una nueva vida como agencia o fundaci√≥n permanente.

Para entonces “Proinpa” ya ten√≠a cierto reconocimiento como marca, as√≠ que sabiamente mantuvieron el acr√≥nimo, pero cambiaron el nombre completo a “Promoci√≥n e Investigaci√≥n de Productos Andinos”. Los dirigentes de Proinpa ya no iban a limitarse a las papas. Los suizos aportaron una dotaci√≥n para cubrir los gastos b√°sicos, pero no era suficiente para hacer funcionar toda la organizaci√≥n.

Proinpa pas√≥ por momentos dif√≠ciles. Cuando dejaron de ser un proyecto, tuvieron que abandonar sus amplias oficinas de la ciudad de Cochabamba. Durante un tiempo alquilaron un viejo edificio alejado de la ciudad que hab√≠a sido un centro gubernamental de control de la rabia. M√°s tarde, s√≥lo pudieron pagar una planta de ese edificio. Recuerdo estar all√≠ el d√≠a de la mudanza, hace a√Īos, cuando todos se dieron modos para entrar en el espacio m√°s peque√Īo, cargando alegremente cajas de archivos para apretarse en oficinas compartidas. Estaban sobreviviendo.

Sobrevivir era importante. La investigaci√≥n agraria p√ļblica en Bolivia atravesaba tiempos dif√≠ciles. El Instituto Boliviano de Investigaci√≥n Agropecuaria (IBTA) cerr√≥ en 1997 y su sustituto muri√≥ pocos a√Īos despu√©s. La investigaci√≥n agropecuaria estatal no se reanud√≥ hasta 2008, cuando se cre√≥ el Instituto Nacional de Innovaci√≥n Agropecuaria y Forestal (INIAF). Durante esos a√Īos, Proinpa fue un destacado centro de investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola en Bolivia, y conserv√≥ invaluables colecciones de papa y quinua.

Ese banco de semillas de papa se manten√≠a en Toralapa, en el campo, a unos 70 km de la ciudad de Cochabamba. Con los a√Īos, Proinpa hab√≠a ampliado la colecci√≥n de 1000 accesiones a 4000. Esta biodiversidad es la fuente de material gen√©tico que necesitan los fitomejoradores para crear nuevas variedades. En 2010, el Gobierno, que era propietario de la estaci√≥n de Toralapa, la cedi√≥ al INIAF. Proinpa trabaj√≥ con el INIAF durante un a√Īo para garantizar una transici√≥n estable, y el Gobierno de Bolivia sigue manteniendo esa colecci√≥n de papas y otros cultivos andinos.

Hace poco, Proinpa me pidi√≥ que me uniera a ellos en el acto de su 25 aniversario, celebrado en su peque√Īo campus, construido despu√©s de 2005. La celebraci√≥n comenz√≥ con visitas a los stands, donde Proinpa destac√≥ sus investigaciones m√°s importantes.

La Dra. Ximena Cadima, miembro de la Academia Boliviana de Ciencias, explic√≥ c√≥mo Proinpa ha usado su conocimiento de los cultivos locales para obtener 69 nuevas variedades oficialmente liberadas de papa, quinua y siete cultivos m√°s. Tambi√©n animan a los agricultores a cultivar papas nativas en sus chacras, lo que tambi√©n es crucial para mantener vivos estos cultivos √ļnicos.

Luis Crespo, entomólogo, y Giovanna Plata, fitopatóloga, explicaron sus investigaciones para desarrollar alternativas ecológicas al control de plagas. Luis habló de su trabajo con las feromonas sexuales de los insectos. Una de las muchas cosas que hace es disecar polillas hembras y extraerles las glándulas de olor, que envía a una empresa en Holanda que aísla la feromona sexual de las glándulas. La empresa sintetiza la feromona, fabrica más y Proinpa la usa para cebo de trampas. Las polillas machos huelen la feromona, piensan que se trata de una hembra receptiva y vuelan hacia ella. Los machos frustrados mueren en la trampa. Las hembras no pueden poner huevos sin aparearse, lo que elimina la siguiente generación de plagas antes de que nazcan.

Giovana nos mostró cómo estudian los microbios que matan a los patógenos. Coloca diferentes hongos y bacterias en placas Petri para ver qué microorganismos pueden desplazar físicamente a los gérmenes que causan enfermedades en los cultivos. También aísla hormonas de crecimiento de plantas, producidas por los microbios buenos.

Este trabajo sobre la ecología de los microbios ha permitido a Proinpa crear una nueva industria de control natural de plagas. Jimmy Ciancas, ingeniero, nos guio por la nueva planta de Proinpa, donde producen toneladas de bacterias y hongos benéficos para sustituir a los químicos que los agricultores fumigan para controlar plagas y enfermedades.

Proinpa también nos mostró las investigaciones del Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio y sus colegas, que están desarrollando rompevientos con plantas nativas y sembrando tarwi silvestre como cultivo de cobertura. Esta investigación tiene como objetivo salvar a los altos Andes de la devastadora erosión desatada cuando el boom de la quinua de (2010-2014) arrasó con la vegetación nativa. El suelo simplemente se voló.

M√°s tarde, nos trasladamos al confortable comedor de Proinpa, sombreado pero abierto al aire por tres lados, perfecto para el clima de Cochabamba. El lugar hab√≠a sido acondicionado como un auditorio formal, donde, durante m√°s de una hora, Proinpa entreg√≥ placas en honor a algunas de las muchas organizaciones que les hab√≠an ayudado a lo largo de los a√Īos: universidades, INIAF, alcaldes de municipios donde Proinpa hace trabajo de campo. Muchas organizaciones reciprocaron, entregando a Proinpa premios que ellos trajeron. Proinpa ha sobrevivido gracias a un buen liderazgo y a sus muchos amigos.

Entre los discursos, tuve la oportunidad de conocer al hombre sentado a mi lado, Lionel Ichazo, que supervisa tres fincas comerciales para una empresa molinera en las tierras bajas del este de Bolivia. Cultivan soya en verano y trigo y sorgo en invierno. Lionel confirm√≥ lo que Proinpa dice, que el uso de plaguicidas naturales se est√° disparando en las llanuras bajas. Lionel usa los plaguicidas naturales de Proinpa como tratamiento de semillas para controlar las enfermedades. Lionel, que tambi√©n es ingeniero agr√≥nomo y graduado de El Zamorano, una de las mejores universidades agr√≠colas de Am√©rica Latina (en Honduras), dijo que not√≥ c√≥mo el suelo ha ido mejorando durante los cuatro a√Īos que ha usado los microbios. Los microorganismos descompon√≠an los rastrojos en carbono que las plantas pod√≠an usar. Lionel a√Īadi√≥ que la mayor√≠a de los agricultores a gran escala siguen usando agroqu√≠micos en el tratamiento de semillas. Sin embargo, se est√° viendo que los productos biol√≥gicos funcionan, con precios accesibles y hasta m√°s baratos que los qu√≠micos. Por supuesto son m√°s sanos para el manipuleo y amigables con el medio ambiente. Y eso es la clave del √©xito de los productos. La demanda se est√° disparando.

Ha tomado muchos a√Īos de investigaci√≥n para producir plaguicidas biol√≥gicos que cuidan el medio ambiente y que puedan convencer a los agricultores comerciales para que empiecen a abandonar los productos agroqu√≠micos. Me acord√© de una √©poca, unos 15 a√Īos antes, cuando vi a Proinpa haciendo ensayos con agricultores cerca de Cochabamba. Aquella fue una etapa temprana de estos productos naturales con base cient√≠fica. La investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola es lenta por naturaleza, pero como un √°rbol frutal que tarda a√Īos en madurar, la espera vale la pena.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

No te comas las c√°scaras

Commercializing organic inputs

El mejor conocimiento es local y científico

Recuper√°ndose del boom de la quinua

Videos relacionados

Cómo hacer un abono biofoliar

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

La avispa que protege nuestros cultivos

Manejando la polilla de la papa

Agradecimientos

Paul Van Mele, Graham Thiele, Rolando Oros, Jorge Blajos y Lionel Ichazo leyeron e hicieron comentarios valiosos sobre una versión previa de este blog.

.

 

Organic leaf fertilizer April 16th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Prosuco is a Bolivian organization that teaches farmers organic farming. Few things are more important than encouraging alternatives to chemical pesticides and fertilizers.

So Prosuco teaches farmers to make two products, 1) sulfur lime: water boiled with sulfur and lime and used as a fungicide. Some farmers also find that it is useful as an insecticide. 2) Biofoliar, a fermented solution of cow and guinea pig manure, chopped alfalfa, ground egg shells, ash, and some storebought ingredients: brown sugar, yoghurt, and dry active yeast. After a few months of fermenting in a barrel, the biofoliar is strained and can be mixed in water to spray onto the leaves of plants.

Conventional farmers often buy chemical fertilizer, designed to spray on a growing crop. But this foliar (leaf) chemical fertilizer is another source of impurities in our food, because the chemical is sprayed on the leaves of growing plants, like lettuce and broccoli.

Paul and Marcella and I were with Prosuco recently, making a video in Cebollullo, a community in a narrow, warm valley near La Paz. These organic farmers usually mix biofoliar together with sulfur lime. They rave about the results. The plants grow so fast and healthy, and these home-made remedies are much cheaper than the chemicals from the shop.

The mixture does seem to work. One farmer, do√Īa Ninfa, showed us her broccoli. There were cabbage moths (plutella) flying around it and landing on the leaves. These little moths are the greatest cabbage pest worldwide, and also a broccoli pest. Do√Īa Ninfa has sprayed her broccoli with sulfur lime and biofoliar. I saw very few holes in the plant leaves, typical of plutella damage, but I couldn‚Äôt find any of their larvae, little green worms. So whatever do√Īa Ninfa was doing, it was working.

I do have a couple of questions. I wonder if, besides the nutrients in the biofoliar, if there are also beneficial microorganisms that help the plants? To know that, we would have to assay the microorganisms in the biofoliar, before and after fermenting it. Then we would need to know which microbes are still alive after being mixed with sulfur lime, which is designed to be a fungicide, i.e., to kill disease-causing fungi. The mixture may reduce the number of microorganisms, but this would not affect the quantity of nutrients for the plants. Farmer-researchers of Cebollullo have been testing different ratios of biofoliar and sulfur lime to develop the most efficient control while reducing the number of sprays, to save time and labor. This is important to them because their fields are often far from the road and far from water.

This is not a criticism of Prosuco, but there needs to be more formal research, for example, from universities, on safe, inexpensive, natural fungicides and fertilizers that farmers can make at home, and on the combinations of these inputs.

Agrochemical companies have all the advantages. They co-opt university research. They have their own research scientists as well. They have advertisers and a host of shopkeepers, motivated by the promise of earning money.

Organic agriculture has the good will of the NGOs, working with local people, and the creativity of the farmers themselves. Even a little more support would make a difference.

Previous Agro-Insight blog

Friendly germs

Related videos

Good microbes for plants and soil

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Acknowledgement

Thanks to Roly Cota, Maya Apaza, and Renato Pardo of Prosuco for introducing us to the community of Cebollullo, and for sharing their thoughts on organic agriculture with us. Thanks to María Quispe, the Director of Prosuco, and to Paul Van Mele, for their valuable comments on previous versions of this story. This work was sponsored by the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation.

ABONO FOLIAR ORG√ĀNICO

Jeff Bentley, 9 de abril del 2023

Prosuco es una organizaci√≥n boliviana que ense√Īa la agricultura ecol√≥gica a los agricultores. Pocas cosas son m√°s importantes que fomentar alternativas a los plaguicidas y fertilizantes qu√≠micos.

As√≠, Prosuco ense√Īa a los agricultores a hacer dos productos: 1) sulfoc√°lcico: agua hervida con azufre y cal que se usa como fungicida. Algunos agricultores tambi√©n ven que es √ļtil como insecticida. 2) Biofoliar, una soluci√≥n fermentada de esti√©rcol de vaca y cuyes, alfalfa picada, c√°scaras de huevo molidas, ceniza y algunos ingredientes comprados en la tienda: az√ļcar moreno, yogurt y levadura seca activa. Tras unos meses de fermentaci√≥n en un barril, el biofoliar se cuela y puede mezclarse con agua para fumigarlo sobre las hojas de las plantas.

Los agricultores convencionales suelen comprar fertilizantes qu√≠micos, dise√Īados para fumigar sobre un cultivo en crecimiento. Pero este fertilizante qu√≠mico foliar es otra fuente de contaminaci√≥n en nuestros alimentos, porque el producto qu√≠mico se fumiga sobre las hojas de las plantas en crecimiento, como la lechuga y el br√≥coli.

Paul, Marcella y yo estuvimos hace poco con Prosuco haciendo un video en Cebollullo, una comunidad ubicada en un valle estrecho y cálido cerca de La Paz. Estos agricultores ecológicos suelen mezclar biofoliar con sulfocálcio. Están encantados con los resultados. Las plantas crecen muy rápido y sanas, y estos remedios caseros son mucho más baratos que los productos químicos de la tienda.

La mezcla parece funcionar. Una agricultora, do√Īa Ninfa, nos ense√Ī√≥ su br√≥coli. Hab√≠a polillas del repollo (plutella) volando alrededor y pos√°ndose en las hojas. Estas peque√Īas polillas son la mayor plaga del repollo en todo el mundo, y tambi√©n del br√≥coli. Do√Īa Ninfa ha fumigado su br√≥coli con sulfoc√°lcico y biofoliar. Vi muy pocos agujeros en las hojas de la planta, t√≠picos de los da√Īos de la plutella, pero no encontr√© ninguna de sus larvas, peque√Īos gusanos verdes. Sea lo que sea, lo que do√Īa Ninfa hac√≠a, le daba buenos resultados.

Tengo un par de preguntas. Me pregunto si, adem√°s de los nutrientes del biofoliar ¬Ņhay tambi√©n microorganismos buenos que ayuden a las plantas? Para saberlo, tendr√≠amos que analizar los microorganismos del biofoliar, antes y despu√©s de fermentarlo. Entonces necesitar√≠amos saber qu√© microorganismos siguen vivos despu√©s de ser mezclados con el sulfoc√°lcico, que est√° dise√Īada para ser un fungicida, es decir, para matar hongos causantes de enfermedades. La mezcla puede que reduzca microorganismos, pero eso no debe bajar la cantidad de nutrientes favorables para las plantas. Agricultores investigadores de Cebollullo han estado probando relaciones de biofoliar y caldo sulfoc√°lcico para desarrollar un control m√°s eficiente y reducir el n√ļmero de fumigaciones, para ahorrar tiempo y trabajo, ya que sus parcelas son de dif√≠cil acceso, y lejos de las fuentes de agua. ¬†¬†.

Esto no es una crítica a Prosuco, pero es necesario que haya más investigación formal, por ejemplo, de las universidades, sobre los fungicidas y abonos seguros, baratos y naturales que los agricultores puedan hacer en casa y sobre las combinaciones de estos insumos.

Las empresas agroquímicas tienen todas las ventajas. Cooptan la investigación universitaria. También tienen sus propios investigadores. Tienen propaganda en los medios masivos y una gran red de distribución comercial, con vendedores motivados por la meta de ganar dinero.

La agricultura ecológica tiene la buena voluntad de las ONGs, que trabajan con la población local, y con la creatividad de los propios agricultores. Un poco más de apoyo haría la diferencia.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Microbios amigables

Videos relacionados

Buenos microbios para plantas y suelo

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Agradecimiento

Gracias a Roly Cota, Maya Apaza, y Renato Pardo de Prosuco por presentarnos a la comunidad de Cebollullo, y por compartir sus ideas sobre la agricultura orgánica con nosotros. Gracias a María Quispe, Directora de Prosuco, y Paul Van Mele, por leer y hacer valiosos comentarios sobre versiones previas de este relato. Este trabajo fue auspiciado por el Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

 

Pheromone traps are social March 26th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Farmers like insecticides because they are quick, easy to use, and fairly cheap, especially if you ignore the health risks.

Fortunately, alternatives are emerging around the world. Entomologists are developing traps made of pheromones, the smells that guide insects to attack, or congregate or to mate. Each species has its own sex pheromone, which researchers can isolate and synthesize. Insects are so attracted to sex pheromones that they can even be used to make traps.

I had seen pheromone traps before, on small farms in Nepal, so I was pleased to see two varieties of pheromone traps in Bolivia.

Paul and Marcella and I were filming a video for farmers on the potato tuber moth, a pest that gets into potatoes in the field and in storage. Given enough time, the larvae of the little tuber moths will eat a potato into a soggy mass of frass.

We visited two farms with Juan Almanza, a talented agronomist who is helping farmers try pheromone traps, among other innovations.

A little piece of rubber is impregnated with the sex pheromone that attracts the male tuber moth. The rubber is hung from a wire inside a plastic trap. One type of trap is like a funnel, where the moths can fly in, but can’t get out again. The males are attracted to the smell of a receptive female, but are then locked in a trap with no escape. They never mate, and so the females cannot lay eggs.

Farmers Pastor Veizaga and Irene Claros showed us traps they had made at home, using an old bottle of cooking oil. The bottle is filled partway with water and detergent. The moth flies around the bait until it stumbles into the detergent water, and dies.

All of the farmers we met were impressed with these simple traps and how many moths they killed. A few of these safe, inexpensive traps, hanging in a potato storage area, could be part of the solution to protecting the potato, loved around the world by people and by moths alike. The pheromone trap could give the farmers a chance to outsmart the moths, without insecticides. But the farmers can’t adopt pheromone traps on their own; it has to be a social effort.

Some ten years previously, pheromone baits were distributed to anyone in Colomi who wanted one. As Juan Almanza explained to me, the mayor’s office announced on the radio that people would receive bait if they took an empty plastic jug to the plant clinic, which operated every Thursday at the weekly fair in the municipal market. Oscar Díaz, who then ran the plant clinic for Proinpa, gave pheromone bait, valued at 25 Bs. (about $3.60), to hundreds of people. Farmers made the traps and used them for years. It may take five years or more for the pheromone to be exhausted from the bait.

Now, only a handful of households in Colomi still use the traps. But most farmers there do spray agrochemicals. Agrochemicals and their alternatives compete in an unfair contest, due in part to policy failure and profit motive. If pesticide shops all closed and farmers did not know where to buy more insecticide, its use would fall off quickly.

Had the municipal government periodically sold pheromone bait to farmers, they might still be making and using the traps.

During Covid, we all learned about supply chains. Sometimes, appropriate tools for agroecology, like pheromone traps, also rely on supplies from outside the farm community.  Manufacturers, distributors, and local government can all be part of this supply chain. Farmers can’t do it on their own.

Acknowledgment

Juan Almanza works for the Proinpa Foundation. He and Paul Van Mele read and commented on a previous version of this story.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Don’t eat the peals

The best knowledge is local and scientific

LAS TRAMPAS DE FEROMONAS SON SOCIALES

Jeff Bentley, 26 de marzo del 2023

A los agricultores les gustan los insecticidas porque son r√°pidos, f√°ciles de usar y bastante baratos, sobre todo si se ignoran los riesgos para la salud.

Afortunadamente, están surgiendo alternativas en todo el mundo. Los entomólogos están desarrollando trampas de feromonas, los olores que guían a los insectos para atacar, congregarse o aparearse. Cada especie tiene su propia feromona sexual, que los investigadores pueden aislar y sintetizar. Los insectos se sienten tan atraídos por las feromonas sexuales que se los puede usar para hacer trampas.

Yo había visto trampas de feromonas antes, usadas en la agricultura familiar en Nepal, así que me alegró ver dos variedades de trampas de feromonas en Bolivia.

Paul, Marcella y yo est√°bamos filmando un v√≠deo para agricultores sobre la polilla de la papa, una plaga que se mete en las papas en el campo y en almac√©n. Con el suficiente tiempo, las larvas de la peque√Īa polilla de la papa se comen una papa hasta convertirla en una masa de excremento.

Visitamos dos familias con Juan Almanza, un agrónomo de talento que está ayudando a los agricultores a probar trampas de feromonas, entre otras innovaciones.

Se impregna un trocito de goma con la feromona sexual que atrae al macho de la polilla de la papa. La goma se cuelga de un alambre dentro de una trampa de plástico. Un tipo de trampa es como un embudo, donde las polillas pueden entrar volando, pero no pueden salir. Los machos se sienten atraídos por el olor de una hembra receptiva, pero entonces quedan encerrados en una trampa sin salida. Nunca se aparean, así que las hembras no pueden poner huevos.

Agricultores Pastor Veizaga e Irene Claros nos ense√Īaron trampas que hab√≠an hecho en casa, usando un viejo bid√≥n de aceite de cocina. La botella se llena hasta la mitad con agua y detergente. La polilla vuela alrededor del cebo hasta que tropieza con el agua del detergente y muere.

Todos los agricultores que conocimos quedaron impresionados con estas sencillas trampas y con la cantidad de polillas que mataban. Unas pocas de estas trampas seguras y baratas, colgadas en un almac√©n de papas, podr√≠an ser parte de la soluci√≥n para proteger la papa, amada en todo el mundo tanto por la gente como por las polillas. La trampa de feromonas podr√≠a dar a los agricultores la oportunidad de enga√Īar a las polillas, sin insecticidas. Pero los agricultores no pueden adoptar las trampas de feromonas por s√≠ solos; tiene que ser un esfuerzo social.

Hace unos diez a√Īos, en Colomi se distribuyeron cebos de feromonas a todos que quer√≠an tener uno. Seg√ļn Juan Almanza me explic√≥, la alcald√≠a anunciaba por la radio que la gente recibir√≠a cebos si llevaba un bid√≥n de pl√°stico vac√≠a a la cl√≠nica de plantas, que funcionaba todos los jueves en la feria semanal, en el mercado municipal. Oscar D√≠az, que entonces dirig√≠a la cl√≠nica de plantas de Proinpa, entreg√≥ cebos de feromonas, valorados en 25 Bs. (unos $3,60), a cientos de personas. Los agricultores fabricaron las trampas y las usaron durante a√Īos. El cebo puede mantener su feromona durante unos cinco a√Īos o m√°s antes de que se agote.

Ahora, pocos hogares de Colomi siguen usando las trampas. Pero la mayoría de los agricultores si fumigan agroquímicos. Los agroquímicos y sus alternativas compiten en una competencia desleal, debida en parte al fracaso de las políticas y los intereses de lucro. Si todas las tiendas de plaguicidas cerraran sus puertas y los agricultores no supieran dónde comprar más insecticida, su uso caería rápidamente.

Si la alcaldía hubiera vendido periódicamente cebos con feromonas a los agricultores, quizá seguirían haciendo y usando las trampas.

Durante Covid, todos aprendimos acerca de las cadenas de suministro. A veces, las herramientas adecuadas para la agroecología, como las trampas de feromonas, también dependen de insumos externos a la comunidad agrícola.  Los fabricantes, los distribuidores y la administración local pueden formar parte de esta cadena de suministro. Los agricultores no pueden hacerlo solos.

Agradecimiento

Juan Almanza trabaja para la Fundaci√≥n Proinpa. √Čl y Paul Van Mele leyeron y comentaron sobre una versi√≥n previa de esta historia.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

No te comas las c√°scaras

El mejor conocimiento es local y científico

Don’t eat the peels March 12th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Smallholders are sometimes thought to be conservative, fearful of change, when the opposite is true. I was in Colomi, a potato-growing municipality in the Bolivian Andes, making a video with Paul and Marcella. Local farmer, don Isidro, was kindly helping us find tuber moths to star in the video. Don Isidro was an expert at spotting this serious potato pest, instantly recognizing the entrance tunnels of the tiny larvae in the skin of the discarded potatoes. In the field, he easily saw the difference between the frost-damaged potato plants and those that were wilted because the moth’s larvae had tunneled through the center of the stalk.

As don Isidro and I work our way across his field, he casually remarked that he no longer had problems with the Andean potato weevil, once the nemesis of Bolivian farmers. Don Isidro explained that now, farmers simply douse the potato plants with lots of insecticide. While don Isidro was happy to be rid of the weevil, he added offhand that when his family fed the potato peelings to their guinea pigs (kept for meat), the little animals died.

‚ÄúAren‚Äôt you afraid to eat those potatoes yourselves?‚ÄĚ I asked.

‚ÄúNo,‚ÄĚ don Isidro said. ‚ÄúWe don‚Äôt eat the peels.‚ÄĚ

‚ÄúBut don‚Äôt you think that the whole potato might be poisoned by the insecticide?‚ÄĚ

‚ÄúNo, I asked the ingeniero (who runs the farm supply shop) and he said it was fine to eat the potatoes,‚ÄĚ don Isidro said.

This stunned me, since I have been eating Bolivian potatoes for a long time. At my house, we often boil potatoes in the peel. Now I had just learned that at least some farmers are producing potatoes so poisonous that they will kill that quintessential lab animal, the guinea pig.

The guinea pig and the potato are both native to the Andes. Farmers here have thousands of years’ experience using this crop and this animal together. Observant smallholders should know that an insecticide that will kill guinea pigs has to be bad for the health of their families, and their consumers.

It’s not just that the farmer believes some oaf who works in an agrochemical shop. Peasant farmers sometimes have too much faith in the word of educated people. Then there is the profit motive, to get rid of a pest like the Andean potato weevil completely, because in the 1990s it was wiping out the potato harvest. These weevils are also disgusting; carving shit-filled tunnels through the tuber. Government policy in most countries also lets the public buy dangerous insecticides over the counter, and there is not enough education or support for alternative technologies. Few agrochemical dealers have training in agriculture. All of that influences farmers’ decisions to use dangerous levels of insecticide. Still, farmers are far from conservative. They are eager to adopt innovations, sometimes even the bad ones.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Juan Almanza (an agronomist with the Proinpa Foundation) and Paul Van Mele for their comments on a previous version of this story.

Related Agro-Insight blog stories

Toxic chemicals and bad advice

NO TE COMAS LAS C√ĀSCARAS

Jeff Bentley, 12 de marzo del 2023

A veces se piensa que los peque√Īos agricultores son conservadores, temerosos del cambio, cuando es todo lo contrario. Hace poco, yo estaba en Colomi, un municipio productor de papas en los Andes bolivianos, grabando un video con Paul y Marcella. El agricultor local, don Isidro, nos ayudaba amablemente a encontrar polillas de la papa para protagonizar el v√≠deo. Don Isidro era un experto en detectar esta grave plaga de la papa, reconociendo al instante los t√ļneles de entrada de las diminutas larvas en la piel de las papas botadas. En el campo, ve√≠a f√°cilmente la diferencia entre las plantas de papa da√Īadas por las heladas y las que se hab√≠an marchitado porque las larvas de la polilla hab√≠an hecho un t√ļnel por el centro del tallo.

Mientras don Isidro y yo recorr√≠amos su campo, coment√≥ casualmente que ya no ten√≠a problemas con el gorgojo de los Andes, anta√Īo la n√©mesis de los agricultores bolivianos. Don Isidro explic√≥ que ahora los agricultores se limitan a fumigar las plantas de la papa con mucho insecticida. Aunque don Isidro estaba contento de haberse librado del gorgojo, a√Īadi√≥ que cuando su familia daba las c√°scaras de la papa a sus cuyes (criados para carne), los animalitos mor√≠an.

“¬ŅNo tienen miedo de comerse ustedes esas papas?” le pregunt√©.

“No”, respondi√≥ don Isidro. “Nosotros no comemos las c√°scaras”.

“¬ŅPero no cree que la papa entera podr√≠a estar envenenada por el insecticida?”

“No, le pregunt√© al ingeniero (que trabajaba en la tienda agropecuaria) y me dijo que no hab√≠a problema en comer las papas”, dijo don Isidro.

Me quedé estupefacto, porque llevo mucho tiempo comiendo papas bolivianas. En mi casa, a menudo hervimos las papas en la cáscara, lo que en Bolivia se llama papa wayk’u. Ahora acababa de enterarme de que al menos algunos agricultores producen papas tan venenosas que matan a ese animal de laboratorio por excelencia que es el conejillo de Indias.

El cuy y la papa son originarios de los Andes. Los agricultores tienen miles de a√Īos de experiencia en el uso conjunto de este cultivo y este animal. Los peque√Īos agricultores observadores deber√≠an saber que un insecticida que mate a los cuyes tiene que ser peligroso para la salud de sus familias y de sus consumidores.

No se trata s√≥lo de que el campesino crea a un fulano que trabaja en una tienda agropecuaria. Los campesinos a veces dan demasiada importancia a la palabra de personas estudiadas. Luego quieren ganar dinero, y de deshacerse por completo de una plaga como el gorgojo de los Andes, porque en los a√Īos noventa estaba acabando con la cosecha de la papa. Estos gorgojos tambi√©n son repugnantes, pues excavan t√ļneles llenos de mierda por todo el tub√©rculo. La pol√≠tica gubernamental en la mayor√≠a de los pa√≠ses tambi√©n permite que el p√ļblico compre insecticidas peligrosos sin receta, y no hay suficiente educaci√≥n o apoyo a las tecnolog√≠as alternativas. Pocos vendedores de agroqu√≠micos tienen formaci√≥n en agronom√≠a. Todo ello influye en la decisi√≥n de los agricultores de usar insecticidas peligrosos. Aun as√≠, los agricultores no son nada conservadores. M√°s bien quieren adoptar innovaciones, a veces hasta las malas.

Agradecimiento

Gracias al Ing. Juan Almanza (de la Fundación Proinpa) y a Paul Van Mele por sus comentarios sobre una versión previa de este relato.

Artículos relacionados del blog Agro-Insight

Químicos tóxicos y consejos malos

No more pink seed January 8th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Vegetable seed from the shop is usually covered in a pink or orange dust, a fungicide. Since I was a kid, I have associated the color pink with seed.

Farmers and gardeners in tropical countries often buy imported, pink seed. So when Bolivian seed companies appeared, I was glad to be able to buy envelopes of local garden seed. It was better than importing seed from the USA or Europe.  I barely noticed that the Bolivian seed was pink. Then on a visit to some agroecological farmers, they told me that they were buying the pink seed, but then rearing it out, to produce their own, natural seed.

Recently I have begun to notice artisanal seed growers, offering untreated vegetable seed at some of the fairs around Cochabamba, Bolivia. I was tempted to buy some, but I still had seed at home.

A few days ago I opened some of my seed envelopes, which I bought several months ago. The package says they are viable for two years. I was pleased to see that the envelopes were full of natural seed, untainted by fungicides. I planted cucumbers, lettuce and arugula, and the natural seed has all sprouted nicely.

I was so pleased that I decided to call the seed manufacturers and congratulate them. Some positive feedback might encourage them to keep selling natural, uncoated seed.

I picked up a seed packet to look for the company‚Äôs phone number, when I noticed that it said ‚ÄúWarning!‚ÄĚ in big red letters, and in fine print: ‚ÄúProduct treated with Thiram, not to be used as feed for poultry or other animals.‚ÄĚ

Thiram is a fungicide. I wondered if the seed had been treated with fungicide, but not dyed, or if the company was avoiding pesticides, but was still using up its supply of old envelopes.

I called the company, and a friendly voice answered the phone. I introduced myself as a customer, and said that I liked the pesticide-free seed. Then I asked if this lot of seed had fungicide or not.

The seed man said that no, the seed had not been treated with fungicide, but that it should have been. That is a requirement of the government agencies Senasag (National Service for Agricultural and Livestock Health and Food Safety) and INIAF (National Institute of Agricultural, Livestock and Forestry Innovation).

I asked why this seed was untreated.

‚ÄúThe girl must have forgotten to put it on,‚ÄĚ the seed man said. This may strike readers in northern countries as casual sloppiness. But sometimes regulations are lightly enforced in Bolivia. My cucumber seeds were packed in May, 2021, during the height of the Covid lockdown. I was impressed that they were able to keep producing seeds at all.

The seed man didn’t seem to mind that the seed was untreated, and he repeated that he applied the pink stuff because it was required by law. He didn’t seem convinced that it was necessary. He seemed sympathetic to people who preferred natural seed. He added that he did sell untreated seed to customers who wanted it. He had some customers who ate sprouted lettuce seed for their gastritis, and he made them special batches of untreated seed.

Before we got off the call, the seed man offered to make me a batch of untreated seed in the future. I just had to order it.

I think I will.

It is important that seed consumers look for untreated seed. But governments also need to do more to help make it available.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

An exit strategy

Homegrown seed can be good

Some videos on seed

Farmers’ rights to seed: experiences from Guatemala

Farmers’ rights to seed: experiences from Malawi

Succeed with seeds

Managing seed potato

Organic coating of cereal seed

Making a good okra seeding

Better seed for green gram

Making a chilli seedbed

Maintaining varietal purity of sesame

Harvesting and storing soya bean seed

Storing cowpea seed

ADIOS A LA SEMILLA ROSADA

Jeff Bentley, 8 de enero del 2023

Las semillas de hortalizas de la tienda suelen estar cubiertas de un polvillo rosado o color naranja, un fungicida. Desde que era ni√Īo, he asociado el color rosado con las semillas.

Los agricultores y jardineros de los países tropicales suelen comprar semillas rosadas importadas. Por eso, cuando aparecieron las empresas bolivianas de semillas, me alegré de poder comprar sobres de semillas locales para el huerto. Era mejor que importar semillas de los Estados Unidos o Europa.  Apenas me di cuenta de que las semillas bolivianas eran rosadas. Luego, en una visita a unos agricultores agroecológicos, me contaron que compraban la semilla rosada, pero que luego la criaban para producir su propia semilla natural.

Recientemente he empezado a fijarme en los cultivadores artesanales de semillas, que ofrecen semillas de hortalizas sin qu√≠micos en algunas de las ferias de los alrededores de Cochabamba, Bolivia. Ten√≠a ganas de comprar algunas, pero a√ļn ten√≠a semillas en casa.

Hace unos d√≠as abr√≠ algunos de mis sobres de semillas, que compr√© hace varios meses. Seg√ļn el paquete, son viables durante dos a√Īos. Me alegr√≥ ver que los sobres estaban llenos de semillas naturales, no contaminadas por fungicidas. Sembr√© pepinos, lechugas y r√ļcula, y todas las semillas naturales han brotado muy bien.

Estaba tan contenta que decidí llamar a los fabricantes de semillas y felicitarles. Una respuesta positiva podría animarles a seguir vendiendo semillas naturales sin recubrimiento.

Cog√≠ un paquete de semillas para buscar el n√ļmero de tel√©fono de la empresa, cuando me di cuenta de que dec√≠a “¬°Precauci√≥n!” en grandes letras rojas, y en letra peque√Īa: “Producto tratado con Thiram, no utilizar como alimento para aves u otro animal”.

Thiram es un fungicida. Me pregunt√© si la semilla hab√≠a sido tratada con fungicida, pero no te√Īida, o si la empresa estaba evitando los plaguicidas, pero segu√≠a usando sus sobres viejos.

Llamé a la empresa y una voz amable contestó al teléfono. Me presenté como cliente y dije que me gustaban las semillas sin plaguicidas. Luego pregunté si este lote de semillas tenía fungicida o no.

El encargado me dijo que no, que la semilla no había sido tratada con fungicida, pero que debería haberlo sido. Es una exigencia de las agencias gubernamentales SENASAG (Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria e Inocuidad Alimentaria) e INIAF (Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agropecuaria y Forestal).

Pregunté por qué esta semilla no estaba tratada.

“Se habr√° olvidado la muchacha”, me dijo el semilleristya. A los lectores de los pa√≠ses del norte les puede parecer un descuido. Pero, a veces, en Bolivia los reglamentos se aplican con cierta flexibilidad. Mis semillas de pepino se empaquetaron en mayo de 2021, en plena cuarentena de Covid. Me impresion√≥ que pudieran seguir produciendo semillas.

Al semillero no pareci√≥ importarle que las semillas no estuvieran tratadas, y repiti√≥ que aplic√≥ el producto rosado porque se lo exig√≠a la ley. No parec√≠a convencido de que fuera necesario. Se solidarizaba con los que prefieren las semillas naturales. A√Īadi√≥ que vende semillas sin tratar a los clientes que la desean. Ten√≠a algunos clientes que com√≠an semillas pregerminadas de lechuga para la gastritis y les preparaba lotes especiales de semillas sin tratar.

Antes de terminar la llamada, el semillero se ofreció a hacerme un lote de semillas sin tratar en el futuro. Sólo tenía que pedirlo.

Creo que lo haré.

Es importante que los consumidores busquen semillas no tratadas. Pero los gobiernos también tienen que hacer más para ayudar a que estén disponibles.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Una estrategia de salida

Homegrown seed can be good

Algunos videos sobre la semilla

Derechos de los agricultores a la semilla: Guatemala

Derechos de los agricultores a la semilla: Malawi

Succeed with seeds

Cuidando la semilla de papa

Organic coating of cereal seed

Buena semilla de ocra

Better seed for green gram

Making a chilli seedbed

Maintaining varietal purity of sesame

Harvesting and storing soya bean seed

Storing cowpea seed

Design by Olean webdesign