WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Giving hope to child mothers October 29th, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Teenage girls are vulnerable and when they become pregnant societies deal with them in different ways. In Uganda, they are called all sorts of names, such as a bad person, a disgrace to parents, and even a prostitute. No one wants their children to associate with them because they are considered a bad influence. Parents often expel their daughters from the family and tell them that their life has come to end. Rebecca Akullu experienced this at the age of 17. But Rebecca is not like any other girl.

After giving birth to her baby, she saved money to go to college, where she got a diploma in business studies in 2018. Rebecca soon got a job as accountant at the Aryodi Bee Farm in Lira, northern Uganda, a region that has high youth unemployment and is still recovering from the violence unleashed by the Lord’s Resistance Army, a rebel group. The farm director appreciated her work so much that he employed her.

‚ÄúOver the years, I developed a real passion for bees,‚ÄĚ Rebecca says, ‚Äúand through hands-on training, I became an expert in beekeeping myself. Whenever l had a chance to visit farmers, I was shocked to see how they destroyed and polluted the environment with agrochemicals, so I became deeply convinced of the need to care for our environment.‚ÄĚ

So, when Access Agriculture launched a call for young entrepreneurs to become farm advisors using a solar-powered projector to screen farmer training videos, Rebecca applied. After being selected as an Entrepreneur for Rural Access (ERA) in 2021, she received the equipment and training. At first she combined her ERA services with her job at the farm, but by the end of the year she resigned. Promoting her new business service required courage. Asked about her first marketing effort, Rebecca said she informed her community at church, at the end of Sunday service.

‚ÄúI was really anxious the first time I had to screen videos to a group of 30 farmers. I wondered if the equipment would work, which video topics the farmers would ask for and whether I would be able to answer their questions afterwards,‚ÄĚ Rebecca recalls. Her anxiety soon evaporated. Farmers wanted to know what videos she had on maize, so she showed several, including the ones on the fall armyworm, a pest that destroys entire fields. Farmers learned how to monitor their maize to detect the pest early, and they started to control it with wood ash instead of toxic pesticides.

Rebecca was asked to organise bi-weekly shows for several months, and she continues to do this, whenever asked. Having negotiated with the farm leader, each farmer pays 1,000 Ugandan Shillings (0.25 Euro) per show, where they watch and discuss three to five videos in the local Luo language. Some of the videos are available in English only, so Rebecca translates them for the farmers. ‚ÄúBut collecting money from individual farmers and mobilising them for each show is not easy,‚ÄĚ she says.

The videos impressed the farmers, and the ball started rolling. Juliette Atoo, a member of one of the farmer groups and primary school teacher in Akecoyere village, convinced her colleagues of the power of these videos, so Barapwo Primary School became Rebecca’s second client, offering her another unique experience.

‚ÄúThe children were so interested to learn and when I went back a month later, I was truly amazed to see how they had applied so many things in their school garden: the spacing of vegetables, the use of ash to protect their vegetable crops, compost making, and so on. The school was happy because they no longer needed to spend money on agrochemicals, and they could offer the children a healthy, organic lunch,‚ÄĚ says Rebecca.

As she grew more confident, new contracts with other schools soon followed. For each client Rebecca negotiates the price depending on the travel distance, accommodation, and how many children watch the videos. Often five videos are screened per day for two consecutive days, earning her between 120,000 and 200,000 Ugandan Shillings (30 to 50 Euros). Schools will continue to be important clients, because the Ugandan government has made skill training compulsory. Besides home economics and computer skills, students can also choose agriculture, so all schools have a practical school farm and are potential clients.

While she continues to engage with schools, over time Rebecca has partly changed her strategy. She now no longer actively approaches farmer groups, but rather explores which NGOs work with farmers in the region and what projects they have or are about to start. Having searched the internet and done background research, it is easier to convince project staff of the value of her video-based advisory service.

As Rebecca, now the mother of four children, does not want to miss the opportunity to respond to the growing number of requests for her video screening service, she is currently training a man and a woman in their early twenties to strengthen her team.

Having never forgotten her own suffering as a young mother, and having experienced the opportunities offered by the Access Agriculture videos, Rebecca also decided to establish her own community-based organisation: the Network for Women in Action, which she runs as a charity. Having impressed her parents, in 2019 they allowed her to set up a demonstration farm (Newa Api Green Farm) on family land, where she trains young girls and pregnant teenage school dropouts in artisan skills such as, making paper bags, weaving baskets and making beehives from locally available materials.

Traditional beehives are made from tree trunks, clay pots, and woven baskets smeared with cow dung that are hung in the trees. To collect the honey, farmers climb the trees and destroy the colonies. From one of the videos made in Kenya, the members of the association learned how to smoke out the bees, and not destroy them.

From another video made in Nepal, Making a Modern Beehive, the women learned to make improved beehives in wooden boxes, which they construct for farmers upon order. From the video, they realised that the currently used bee boxes were too large. ‚ÄúBecause small colonies are unable to generate the right temperature within the large hives, we only had a success rate of 50%. Now we make our hives smaller, and 8 out 10 hives are colonised successfully,‚ÄĚ says Rebecca.

Young women often have no land of their own, so members who want to can place their beehives on the demo farm. ‚ÄúWe also have a honey press. All members used to bring their honey to our farm. But from the video Turning Honey into Money, we learned that we can easily sieve the honey through a clean cloth after we have put the honey in the sun. So now, women can process the honey directly at their homes.‚ÄĚ

The bee business has become a symbol of healing. Farmers understand that their crops benefit from bees, so the young women beekeepers are appreciated for their service to the farming community. But also, parents who had expelled their pregnant daughter, embarrassed by societal judgement, begin to accept their entrepreneurial daughter again as she sends cash and food to her parents.

‚ÄúWe even trained young women to harvest honey, which traditionally only men do. When people in a village see our young girls wearing a beekeeper‚Äôs outfit and climbing trees, they are amazed. It sends out a powerful message to young girls that, even if you become a victim of early motherhood, there is always hope. Your life does not end,‚ÄĚ concludes Rebecca.

 

Kindermoeders weer hoop geven

Tienermeisjes zijn kwetsbaar en als ze zwanger worden gaan maatschappijen vaak op verschillende manieren met hen om. In Oeganda worden ze allerlei namen gegeven, zoals een slecht persoon, een schande voor de ouders en zelfs een prostituee. Niemand wil dat hun kinderen met hen omgaan omdat ze als een slechte invloed worden beschouwd. Ouders verstoten hun dochters vaak uit de familie en vertellen hen dat hun leven voorbij is. Dit is wat Rebecca Akullu meemaakte op 17-jarige leeftijd. Maar Rebecca is niet zoals ieder ander meisje.

Na de geboorte van haar baby spaarde ze geld om naar de universiteit te gaan en haalde in 2018 een diploma in bedrijfswetenschappen. Rebecca kreeg al snel een baan als boekhouder bij de Aryodi Bee Farm in Lira, in het noorden van Oeganda, een regio met een hoge jeugdwerkloosheid die nog herstellende is van de opstand van Lord’s Resistance Army, een gewelddadige rebellengroepering. De directeur waardeerde haar werk zo erg dat hij haar in dienst nam.

“In de loop der jaren ontwikkelde ik een echte passie voor bijen,” vertelt Rebecca, “en door praktische training werd ik zelf een expert in het houden van bijen. Telkens als ik de kans kreeg om boeren te bezoeken, was ik geschokt om te zien hoe ze het milieu vernietigden en vervuilden met landbouwchemicali√ęn, dus ik raakte diep overtuigd van de noodzaak om voor ons milieu te zorgen.”

Dus toen Access Agriculture een oproep deed voor jonge ondernemers om landbouwadviseurs te worden met een projector op zonne-energie om trainingsvideo’s voor boeren te vertonen, schreef Rebecca zich in. Nadat ze was geselecteerd als Entrepreneur for Rural Access (ERA), ontving ze de apparatuur en de training in 2021. Aanvankelijk bleef ze part-time werken, doch tegen het einde van het jaar nam ze ontslag om volledig op eigen benen te staan. Om haar nieuwe bedrijfsdienst te promoten was moed nodig. Gevraagd naar haar eerste marketingpoging, zei Rebecca dat ze haar gemeenschap in de kerk informeerde, aan het einde van de zondagsdienst.

“De eerste keer dat ik video’s moest vertonen aan een groep van 30 boeren, was ik echt bang. Ik vroeg me af of de apparatuur zou werken, naar welke video’s de boeren zouden vragen en of ik hun vragen na afloop zou kunnen beantwoorden,” herinnert Rebecca zich. Haar bezorgdheid verdween al snel. Boeren wilden weten welke video’s ze had over ma√Įs, dus liet ze er verschillende zien, waaronder die over de fall armyworm, een ernstige plaag die hele gewassen vernietigt. Boeren leerden hoe ze hun velden in de gaten konden houden om de plaag vroegtijdig te ontdekken en ze begonnen houtas te gebruiken in plaats van giftige pesticiden om de plaag te bestrijden.

Rebecca werd gevraagd om gedurende een aantal maanden tweewekelijkse shows te organiseren en doet dit nog steeds wanneer haar dat wordt gevraagd. Na onderhandeling met de leider van de lokale boerenorganisatie betaalt elke boer 1.000 Oegandese Shilling (0,25 euro) per show, waarbij ze drie tot vijf video’s in de lokale Luo-taal bekijken en bespreken. Sommige video’s zijn alleen in het Engels beschikbaar, dus vertaalt Rebecca ze voor de boeren. “Maar het is niet gemakkelijk om geld in te zamelen van individuele boeren en hen te mobiliseren voor elke show,” zegt ze.

De video’s maakten indruk op de boeren en de bal ging aan het rollen. Juliette Atoo, lid van een van de boerengroepen en lerares op een basisschool in het dorp Akecoyere, overtuigde haar collega’s van de kracht van deze video’s en zo werd de Barapwo basisschool Rebecca’s tweede klant, wat haar weer een unieke ervaring opleverde.

“De kinderen waren zo ge√Įnteresseerd om te leren en toen ik een maand later terugging, was ik echt verbaasd om te zien hoe ze zoveel dingen hadden toegepast in hun schooltuin: de afstand tussen groenten, het gebruik van as om hun groentegewassen te beschermen, compost maken, enzovoort. De school was blij omdat ze geen geld meer hoefden uit te geven aan landbouwchemicali√ęn en ze de kinderen een gezonde, biologische lunch konden aanbieden,” herinnert Rebecca zich.

Naarmate ze meer vertrouwen kreeg, volgden al snel nieuwe contracten met andere scholen. Voor elke klant onderhandelt Rebecca over de prijs, afhankelijk van de afstand die moet worden afgelegd, de accommodatie en het aantal kinderen dat de video’s bekijkt. Vaak worden er vijf video’s per dag vertoond gedurende twee opeenvolgende dagen, waarmee ze tussen de 120.000 en 200.000 Oegandese Shillings (30 tot 50 euro) verdient. Scholen blijven belangrijke klanten, omdat de Oegandese overheid vaardigheidstraining verplicht heeft gesteld. Naast huishoudkunde en computervaardigheden kunnen leerlingen ook kiezen voor landbouw, dus alle scholen hebben een praktische schoolboerderij en zijn potenti√ęle klanten.

Hoewel ze contact blijft houden met scholen, heeft Rebecca in de loop der tijd haar strategie deels gewijzigd. Ze benadert nu niet langer actief boerengroepen, maar onderzoekt welke NGO’s met boeren in de regio werken en welke projecten ze hebben of op het punt staan te starten. Nadat ze op internet heeft gezocht en achtergrondonderzoek heeft gedaan, is het gemakkelijker om projectmedewerkers te overtuigen van de waarde van de op video gebaseerde voorlichtingsdienst.

Omdat Rebecca, inmiddels moeder van vier kinderen, de kans niet wil missen om in te gaan op het toenemende aantal aanvragen voor haar video-adviesdienst, leidt ze momenteel een jonge man en jonge vrouw van begin twintig op om haar team te versterken.

Rebecca is haar eigen lijden als jonge moeder nooit vergeten en heeft de mogelijkheden ervaren die de video’s van Access Agriculture bieden. Daarom heeft ze ook besloten om haar eigen gemeenschapsorganisatie op te richten: het Netwerk voor Vrouwen in Actie, dat ze als liefdadigheidsinstelling runt. Nadat ze indruk had gemaakt op haar ouders, gaven ze haar in 2019 toestemming om een demonstratieboerderij (Newa Api Green Farm) op te zetten op het land van haar familie. Hier traint ze jonge meisjes en zwangere schoolverlaters in ambachtelijke vaardigheden, zoals het maken van papieren zakken, het weven van manden en het maken van bijenkorven met behulp van lokaal beschikbare materialen.

Traditionele bijenkorven zijn gemaakt van boomstammen, kleipotten en gevlochten manden besmeerd met koeienmest die in de bomen worden gehangen. Om de honing te verzamelen klimmen de boeren in de bomen en vernietigen ze de kolonies. Op een van de video’s die in Kenia werd gemaakt, leerden de leden van de vereniging hoe ze de bijen konden uitroken en niet vernietigen.

Op een andere video, gemaakt in Nepal, leerden de vrouwen houten bijenkasten te maken, die ze op bestelling voor boeren bouwen. Door de video realiseerden ze zich dat de huidige bijenkasten (Top Bar Hive) te groot waren. “Omdat kleine volken niet in staat zijn om de juiste temperatuur in de grote bijenkasten te genereren, hadden we slechts een succespercentage van 50%. Nu maken we onze bijenkasten kleiner en worden 8 op de 10 bijenkasten succesvol gekoloniseerd,” zegt Rebecca.

Jonge vrouwen hebben vaak geen eigen land, dus leden die dat willen kunnen hun bijenkorven op de demoboerderij zetten. “We hebben ook een honingpers. Vroeger brachten alle leden hun honing naar onze boerderij. Maar van de video’s hebben we geleerd dat we de honing gemakkelijk kunnen zeven door een schone doek nadat we de honing in de zon hebben gezet. Dus nu kunnen de vrouwen de honing direct bij hen thuis verwerken.”

De bijenteelt is een symbool van genezing geworden. Boeren begrijpen dat hun gewassen baat hebben bij bijen, dus de jonge imkervrouwen worden gewaardeerd voor hun diensten aan de boerengemeenschap. Maar ook ouders die eerst hun zwangere dochter hadden weggestuurd, beschaamd door het sociale stigma, beginnen hun ondernemende dochter weer te accepteren nu ze geld en voedsel naar haar ouders sturen.

“We hebben zelfs jonge vrouwen opgeleid tot honingoogsters, iets wat traditioneel alleen mannen doen. Als mensen in een dorp onze jonge meisjes in imkeroutfit in bomen zien klimmen, zijn ze verbaasd. Het is een krachtige boodschap voor jonge meisjes dat er altijd hoop is, zelfs als je het slachtoffer wordt van vroeg moederschap. Je leven is niet voorbij,” besluit Rebecca.

Neighborhood trees August 20th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Trees make a city feel like a decent place to live. That often means planting the trees, which help to cool cities, sequester carbon and provide a habitat for birds and other wildlife. But large-scale tree planting in a city can be difficult.

Cochabamba, Bolivia is one of many fast-growing, tropical cities. In the not-too-distant future, most of the world’s people may live in a city like this. Cochabamba is nestled in a large Andean valley, but in the last twenty years, the city has also spread into the nearby Sacaba Valley, which was formerly devoted to growing rainfed wheat. As late as the 1990s, the small town of Sacaba was just a few blocks wide. Now 220,000 people live in that valley, which has become part of metropolitan Cochabamba. The wheat fields of Sacaba have been replaced by a maze of asphalt streets, and neat homes of brick, cement and tile.

I was in Sacaba recently with my wife Ana, who introduced me to some people who are planting trees along the banks of a dry wash, the Waych’a Mayu. It was once a seasonal stream, but it is now dry all year. It has been blocked upstream by people who have built streets and causeways over it.

For the past 18 months, an architect, Alain Vimercati, and an agroforester, Ariel Ayma, have been working with local neighborhoods in Sacaba to organize tree planting. That included many meetings with the leaders and the residents of 12 grassroots neighborhood associations (OTBs‚ÄĒorganizaciones territoriales de base) to plan the project.

They decided to plant trees along the Waych’a Mayu, which still had some remnant forests of dryland trees, like molle and jarka. The local people had seen some of the long, shady parks in the older parts of Cochabamba. They were excited to have a green belt, five kilometers long, running through their own neighborhoods. Alain and Ariel, with the NGO Pro Hábitat, produced 2,400 tree seedlings in partnership with the local, public forestry school (ESFOR-UMSS). The local people dug the holes, planted the trees, and built small protective fences around them.

The trees were planted in January. In July, Ana and I went with about 20 people from some of the OTBs to see how the seedlings were doing. When we reached the line of trees, Ariel, the agro-forester, pointed out that the trees had more than doubled in size in just six months. Eighty percent of them had survived. But now they had to be maintained. It has been a dry year, and it hasn‚Äôt rained for five months. The trees were starting to wilt. Even so, Ariel encouraged the people by saying ‚Äúmaintenance is more important than water.‚ÄĚ He meant that while the trees did need some water, they also needed to be protected. It is important to reassure people that they won‚Äôt have to spend money on water. Many people in Sacaba have to buy their water. As we met, cistern trucks drove up and down the streets, offering 200 liters of water for 7 Bolivianos ($1).

The seedlings include a few hardy lemons, but most of the other species are native, dryland trees: guava, broadleaf hopbush (chacatea), jacaranda, tara, tipa, and ceibo.

Ariel used a pick and shovel to show the group how to clear a half-moon around the trees, to catch rain water. He has a Ph.D. in agroforestry, but he seems to love the physical work.

Ariel cut the weeds from around the first tree, and placed them around the base of the trunk, to shade the soil. The representatives from the OTBs, including a retired man, and a woman carrying a baby, quickly agreed to meet a week later, and to bring more people from each neighborhood, to help take care of the trees.

Ana and I went back the following Saturday. A Bolivian bank had paid for a tanker truck of water (16,000 liters, worth about $44). I was surprised how many people turned out, as many as fifteen or twenty at some OTBs. They used their own picks and shovels to quickly clean out the hole around each tree. Then they waited for the tanker truck to fill their barrels so the people from the neighborhoods could give each thirsty tree a bucketful of water. Ariel explained that a bit of water the first year will help the trees recover from the shock of being transplanted, then they should normally survive on rain water. The neighbors did feel a sense of ownership. Some of them told us that they occasionally poured a bucket of recycled water on the trees near their homes.

Ariel is also a professor of forestry, and some of his students had come to help advise the local people. But the residents did most of the work, and in most OTBs the trees were soon weeded and ready to be watered.

The people have settled in Sacaba from all over highland Bolivia, from Oruro, La Paz, Potosí and rural parts of Cochabamba. They have organized themselves into OTBs, which made it possible for Alain and Ariel to work with the neighborhood associations to plan the greenbelt and plant the trees. The cell phone also helps. A few years ago, people had to be invited by a local leader going door-to-door. At those few neighborhoods where no one showed up, Alain phoned the leader of the OTB, who rang up the neighbors. Sometimes within half an hour of making the first phone call, people were digging out the holes around each tree.

In the rapidly-growing cities of the developing world, many of the new residents are from farming communities, and they have rural skills, useful when planting trees. Their new neighborhoods will be much nicer places to live if they have trees. Hopefully, as this case shows, the tree species will be well suited to the local environment, and the local people will be empowered with a sense of ownership of their green areas.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Alain Vimercati and Ariel Ayma of Pro H√°bitat, and to all the people who are planting and caring for the trees.

Scientific names

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (previously Acacia visco)

Guava Psidium guajava

Broadleaf hopbush (common name in Bolivia: chacatea), Dodonaea viscosa

Jacaranda Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-galli

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The cherry on the pie

Experiments with trees

The right way to distribute trees

Videos on caring for trees

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Flowering plants attract the insects that help us

Demi lunes

Managed regeneration

ARBOLES DEL BARRIO

Jeff Bentley, 20 de agosto del 2023

Los árboles hacen que una ciudad sea más amena. A menudo hay que plantar los árboles, que ayudan a refrescar las ciudades, capturar carbono y crear un hábitat para la vida silvestre, como las aves. Pero plantar árboles a gran escala en una ciudad puede ser difícil.

Cochabamba, Bolivia es una de las muchas ciudades tropicales de r√°pido crecimiento. En un futuro pr√≥ximo, la mayor parte de la poblaci√≥n mundial podr√≠a vivir en una ciudad como √©sta. Cochabamba est√° anidada en un gran valle andino, pero en los √ļltimos veinte a√Īos la ciudad se ha extendido tambi√©n al cercano valle de Sacaba, antes sembrado en trigo de secano. En la d√©cada de los 1990, la peque√Īa ciudad de Sacaba s√≥lo ten√≠a unas manzanas de ancho. Ahora viven 220.000 personas en ese valle, que ha pasado a formar parte de la zona metropolitana de Cochabamba. Los trigales de Sacaba han sido sustituidos por un laberinto de calles asfaltadas y bonitas casas de ladrillo, cemento y teja.

Hace poco estuve en Sacaba con mi esposa Ana, que me present√≥ a unas personas que est√°n plantando √°rboles a orillas de un arroyo seco, el Waych’a Mayu. Antes era un arroyo estacional, pero ahora est√° seco todo el a√Īo. Ha sido bloqueado r√≠o arriba por personas que han construido calles y terraplenes sobre el curso del agua.

Durante los √ļltimos 18 meses, un arquitecto, Alain Vimercati, y un doctor en ciencias silvoagropecuarias, Ariel Ayma, han trabajado con los vecinos de Sacaba para organizar la plantaci√≥n de √°rboles. Eso incluy√≥ varias reuniones con los l√≠deres y los residentes de 12 organizaciones territoriales de base (OTBs) para planificar el proyecto.

Decidieron plantar √°rboles a lo largo del Waych’a Mayu, que a√ļn conservaba algunos bosques remanentes de √°rboles de secano, como molle y jarka. La poblaci√≥n local hab√≠a visto algunos de los largos parques arboleados de las zonas m√°s antiguas de Cochabamba. Estaban entusiasmados con la idea de tener un cintur√≥n verde de cinco kil√≥metros que atravesara sus barrios de ellos. Alain y Ariel, con la ONG Pro H√°bitat, produjeron 2.400 plantines de √°rboles en coordinaci√≥n con la Escuela de Ciencias Forestales (ESFOR-UMSS). Los vecinos cavaron los hoyos, plantaron los √°rboles y construyeron peque√Īos cercos protectores alrededor de cada uno.

Los √°rboles se plantaron en enero. En julio, Ana y yo fuimos con unas 20 personas de algunas de las OTBs a ver c√≥mo iban los plantines. Cuando llegamos a la l√≠nea de √°rboles, Ariel nos dijo que los √°rboles hab√≠an duplicado su tama√Īo en s√≥lo seis meses. El 80% hab√≠a sobrevivido. Pero ahora hab√≠a que mantenerlos. Ha sido un a√Īo seco y no ha llovido en cinco meses. Los √°rboles empezaban a marchitarse. Aun as√≠, Ariel anim√≥ a la gente diciendo que “el mantenimiento es m√°s importante que el agua”. Quer√≠a decir que, aunque los √°rboles necesitaban agua, tambi√©n hab√≠a que protegerlos. Es importante asegurar a la gente que no tendr√° que gastar dinero en agua. Muchos habitantes de Sacaba tienen que comprar el agua. Mientras nos reun√≠amos, camiones cisterna recorr√≠an las calles ofreciendo 200 litros de agua por 7 bolivianos (1 d√≥lar).

Entre los plantines hay algunos limones resistentes, pero la mayoría de las demás especies son árboles nativos de secano: guayaba, chacatea, jacarandá, tara, tipa y ceibo.

Ariel usó una picota y una pala para mostrar al grupo cómo limpiar una media luna alrededor de los árboles, para recoger el agua de lluvia. Tiene un doctorado, pero parece que le encanta el trabajo físico.

Ariel cortó el monte de alrededor del primer árbol y colocó la challa alrededor de la base del tronco, para dar sombra al suelo. Los representantes de las OTB, entre ellos un jubilado y una mujer con un bebé a cuestas, acordaron rápidamente reunirse una semana más tarde y traer a más gente de cada barrio para ayudar a cuidar los árboles.

Ana y yo volvimos el s√°bado siguiente. Un banco boliviano hab√≠a pagado un cami√≥n cisterna de agua (16.000 litros, por valor de unos 300 Bolivianos‚ÄĒ44 d√≥lares). Me sorprendi√≥ la cantidad de gente que acudi√≥, hasta quince o veinte en algunas OTBs. Usaron sus propias palas y picotas para limpiar r√°pidamente el agujero alrededor de cada √°rbol. Luego esperaron a que el cami√≥n cisterna llenara sus barriles para que los vecinos pudieran dar a cada √°rbol sediento un cubo lleno de agua. Ariel explic√≥ que un poco de agua el primer a√Īo ayudar√≠a a los √°rboles a recuperarse del shock de ser trasplantados, y que despu√©s deber√≠an sobrevivir normalmente con el agua de lluvia. Los vecinos estaban empezando a cuidar a los arbolitos. Algunos nos contaron que de vez en cuando echaban un cubo de agua reciclada en los √°rboles cercanos a sus casas.

Ariel es tambi√©n profesor universitario, y algunos de sus alumnos hab√≠an venido a ayudar a asesorar a los lugare√Īos. Pero los residentes hicieron la mayor parte del trabajo, y en la mayor√≠a de las OTBs los √°rboles pronto estaban limpiados y listos para ser regados.

La gente se ha asentado en Sacaba de toda la parte alta de Bolivia, de Oruro, La Paz, Potos√≠ y zonas rurales de Cochabamba. Se han organizado en OTBs, lo que ha permitido a Alain y Ariel trabajar con ellos para planificar el cintur√≥n verde y plantar los √°rboles. El celular tambi√©n ayuda. Hace unos a√Īos, la gente ten√≠a que ser invitada por un dirigente local que iba puerta en puerta. En los pocos barrios donde no aparec√≠a nadie, Alain telefoneaba al dirigente de la OTB, que llamaba a los vecinos. A veces, media hora despu√©s de la primera llamada, la gente ya estaba cavando los agujeros alrededor de cada √°rbol.

En las ciudades de r√°pido crecimiento del mundo en v√≠as del desarrollo, muchos de los nuevos residentes vienen de comunidades agr√≠colas y tienen conocimientos rurales, √ļtiles a la hora de plantar √°rboles. Sus nuevos barrios ser√°n lugares mucho m√°s agradables para vivir si tienen √°rboles. Ojal√° que, como demuestra este caso, las especies arb√≥reas se adapten bien al ambiente local y la gente local sea empoderada para adue√Īarse de sus √°reas verdes.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Alain Vimercati y Ariel Ayma de Pro H√°bitat, y a todos los vecinos que plantan y cuidan sus √°rboles.

Nombres científicos

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (antes Acacia visco)

Guayaba Psidium guajava

Chacatea Dodonaea viscosa

Jacarand√° Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-gall

También en el blog de Agro-Insight

The cherry on the pie

Experimentos con √°rboles

La manera correcta de distribuir los √°rboles

Videos sobre el cuidado de los √°rboles

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Las plantas con flores atraen a los insectos que nos ayudan

Medias lunas

Regeneración manejada

 

Seeing the life in the soil June 25th, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Earlier, Jeff and I have written various blogs about the importance of soil organic matter and soil life to support  thriving, sustainable food production. Soils that have many living organisms hold more carbon and nutrients and can better absorb and retain rainwater, all of which are crucial in these times of a disturbed climate.

But measuring life in soils can be a time-consuming activity depending on what one wants to measure. While bacteria and fungi cannot be seen by the naked eye, ants, grubs and earth worms can.

In one of the training videos that we filmed in Bolivia last February, Eliseo Mamani from the PROINPA Foundation, a science and technology organization, shows us meticulously how you can measure the visible soil organisms with farmers. Using a standardised method to measure soil life is important if you want to evaluate how certain farming practices have an effect on the life of your soil.

One early morning, we pick up Ana Mamani and Rubén Chipana from their homes to take us to a field on the altiplano that has been cultivated for various years and that has not received any organic fertilizer. The farmers of Chiarumani, Patacamaya, about 100 kilometres south of La Paz, have learned through collaborative research that there are more living things in some parts of the field, and fewer in other parts, so they take samples from 3 parts of the field.

With a spade they remove a block of soil 20 centimetres wide, 20 centimetres long and 20 centimetres deep. They carefully put all this soil in a white bag and close it tightly, so that the living things do not escape, because the earthworms and other living things move quickly.

We then drive to another place, where they collect 3 more samples from a field that has received organic fertilizer and where organic vegetables are grown. All samples are put in blue bags, all nicely labelled.

Under the shade of a tree, some more farmers have gathered to start counting the living organisms. One handful of soil at a time, they empty each bag on a plastic tray. As they come across a living creature, they carefully pick it out and report it to Eliseo who takes notes: how many earthworms, how many ants, how many termites, how many beetles, how many spiders and how many grubs.

After an hour, the results are added up and samples compared: there are only many earthworms in the soil from the field that received organic fertilizer. The farmers discuss the findings in group and conclude: If your soil has few living things, you can bring your soil to life by adding animal manure or compost, by leaving crop residues in the field, and not burning them. You can also improve soil life by ploughing less, as ploughing disturbs bacteria, fungi, and animals that add fertility to the soil.

After returning back home from our trip to Bolivia, I am still reflecting on the many things we have learned from farmers and the organisations who do basic, yet relevant research with them, when Marcella points to the fields in front of our office. In March, at the onset of spring, moles are most active. It is striking: the field to the left that hasn’t been ploughed or fertilized for several years has many mole hills. The field on the right is intensively managed and does not have a single mole hill. Ploughing reduces organic matter, which is feed for earthworms. Herbicides and pesticides kill soil life, including earthworms. Also, liquid manure, which is used abundantly across Flanders and the Netherlands, can kill earthworms, especially when cows have received antibiotics and other drugs. Liquid manure may also contain heavy metals used for animal feed, such as zinc and copper.

Earthworms can be counted and used as soil health bioindicators. When done in collaborative research with farmer groups this helps farmers understand how certain farming practices affects the health of their soil and the long-term sustainability of their farm. However, if you don’t have time to go out with a spade to take soil samples, even above ground indicators such as mole hills can offer a quick alternative.

Acknowledgements

The visit to Bolivia to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one, was made possible with the generous support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to the Foundation for the Promotion and Research of Andean Products (PROINPA) who introduced us to the communities, and to Eliseo Mamani in particular who led the soil exercises with the farmers for this video.

Related videos

Seeing the life in the soil

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Soil science, different but right

Killing the soil with chemicals (and bringing it back to life)

Commercialising organic inputs

 

Het leven in de bodem zien

Jeff en ik hebben al eerder verschillende blogs geschreven over het belang van organische stof in de bodem en bodemleven om duurzame voedselproductie te ondersteunen. Bodems met veel levende organismen houden meer koolstof en voedingsstoffen vast en kunnen regenwater beter absorberen en vasthouden, wat allemaal cruciaal is in deze tijden van een verstoord klimaat.

Maar het meten van het leven in de bodem kan een tijdrovende bezigheid zijn, afhankelijk van wat men wil meten. Terwijl bacteri√ęn en schimmels niet met het blote oog te zien zijn, zijn mieren, larven en regenwormen dat wel.

In een van de trainingsvideo’s die we afgelopen februari in Bolivia hebben gefilmd, laat Eliseo Mamani van PROINPA, een wetenschappelijk en technologisch instituut, nauwkeurig zien hoe je samen met boeren de zichtbare bodemorganismen kunt meten. Het gebruik van een gestandaardiseerde methode om het bodemleven te meten is belangrijk als je wilt evalueren welk effect bepaalde landbouwpraktijken hebben op het bodemleven.

Op een vroege ochtend halen we Ana Mamani en Rubén Chipana op van hun huis om ons naar een veld op de altiplano te brengen dat al verschillende jaren wordt bewerkt en waar geen organische meststoffen zijn gebruikt. De boeren van Chiarumani, Patacamaya, ongeveer 100 kilometer ten zuiden van La Paz, hebben door gezamenlijk onderzoek geleerd dat er in sommige delen van het veld meer levende wezens zijn en in andere delen minder, dus nemen ze monsters van 3 delen van het veld.

Met een spade halen ze een blok grond weg van 20 centimeter breed, 20 centimeter lang en 20 centimeter diep. Ze doen al deze grond voorzichtig in een witte zak en sluiten deze goed af, zodat de levende wezens niet kunnen ontsnappen, want de regenwormen en andere levende wezens verplaatsen zich snel.

Daarna rijden we naar een andere plek, waar ze nog 3 monsters verzamelen van een veld dat organische mest heeft gekregen en waar organische groenten worden verbouwd. Alle monsters worden in blauwe zakken gedaan, allemaal netjes gelabeld.

Onder de schaduw van een boom hebben zich nog meer boeren verzameld om te beginnen met het tellen van de levende organismen. Een handvol grond per keer legen ze elke zak op een plastic dienblad. Als ze een levend wezen tegenkomen, pikken ze het er voorzichtig uit en rapporteren het aan Eliseo die aantekeningen maakt: hoeveel regenwormen, hoeveel mieren, hoeveel termieten, hoeveel kevers, hoeveel spinnen en hoeveel engerlingen.

Na een uur worden de resultaten opgeteld en de monsters vergeleken: er zitten alleen veel regenwormen in de grond van het veld dat organische mest heeft gekregen. De boeren bespreken de bevindingen in groep en concluderen: Als je bodem weinig levende wezens heeft, kun je je bodem tot leven brengen door dierlijke mest of compost toe te voegen, door gewasresten op het veld te laten liggen en ze niet te verbranden. Je kunt het bodemleven ook verbeteren door minder te ploegen, want ploegen verstoort bacteri√ęn, schimmels en dieren die vruchtbaarheid aan de bodem toevoegen.

Na terugkomst van onze reis naar Bolivia ben ik nog steeds aan het nadenken over de vele dingen die we hebben geleerd van boeren en de organisaties die samen met hen eenvoudig, maar relevant onderzoek doen, als Marcella naar de velden voor ons kantoor wijst. In maart, aan het begin van de lente, zijn de mollen het actiefst. Het is opvallend: het veld links, dat al een paar jaar niet geploegd of bemest is, heeft veel molshopen. Het veld rechts wordt intensief beheerd en heeft geen enkele molshoop. Door ploegen vermindert het organisch materiaal, dat voedsel is voor regenwormen. Herbiciden en pesticiden doden het bodemleven, waaronder regenwormen. Ook vloeibare mest, die in heel Vlaanderen en Nederland overvloedig wordt gebruikt, kan regenwormen doden, vooral wanneer koeien antibiotica en andere medicijnen hebben gekregen. Vloeibare mest kan ook zware metalen bevatten die worden gebruikt voor diervoeder, zoals zink en koper.

Regenwormen kunnen worden geteld en gebruikt als bio-indicatoren voor de gezondheid van de bodem. Wanneer dit in samenwerking met boerengroepen wordt gedaan, helpt dit boeren te begrijpen hoe bepaalde landbouwpraktijken de gezondheid van hun bodem en de duurzaamheid van hun boerderij op de lange termijn be√Įnvloeden. Maar indien je geen tijd hebt om bodemmonsters te nemen met een spade, bieden bovengrondse indicatoren zoals molshopen een snel alternatief.

Bekijk de video

Seeing the life in the soil

Soil science, different but right April 23rd, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Soil may be the basis of farming, and therefore of almost all of our food, but farmers and soil scientists see the soil in completely different, if equally valid ways.

In Bolivia, I was recently making a video with Paul and Marcella on soil tests that extension agents can do with farmers. Our local expert was Eliseo Mamani, a gifted Bolivian agronomist.

Before our visit, Eliseo had prepared three soil tests in collaboration with soil scientist Steve Vanek. One of the tests uses bottles and sieves and cloth to separate out the ‚Äúparticulate organic matter‚ÄĚ, or POM ‚Ķ dark brown crumbs of carbon-rich, dead plant and animal litter that feed the plants. Good soil has more POM than poor soil.

In preparation for our visit, Eliseo had been practicing the soil tests with local farmers. He introduced us to Victoria Quispe, who farms and herds llamas and sheep with her husband. I asked do√Īa Victoria what made a good soil. I thought she might say something like its rich organic matter. She could have also said it has neutral pH, because one of the tests Eliseo had taught them was to use pH paper to see when soil is too acidic or too alkaline.

But no, do√Īa Victoria said, ‚ÄúWe know when the soil is good by the plants growing on it.‚ÄĚ The answer makes perfect sense. These communities on the high Altiplano grow potatoes for a year, then quinoa for a year, and then they fallow the land for at least six years. In that time, the high pampas become covered with native needle grass, and various species of native brush called t‚Äôula.

Later in the day, Eliseo led four farmers to do the POM test. They collected soil from a well-rested field and from one that had been recently cultivated. The group washed a sample of soil from each field and carefully sieved out the POM, little pieces about 2 mm across. Then Eliseo carefully arranged the particles into small disks on a piece of white paper. The soil from the tired soil yielded only enough POM to make a disk of 2 cm in diameter. But the circle from the rested soil was 6 cm across.

In other words, the well-rested soil was covered in native plants, and it had lots more particulate organic matter than the tired soil, which had only a light covering of plants. The scientific test and local knowledge had reached the same conclusion, that fallow can improve the soil. Soil scientists tend to look at what soil is made of. Farmers notice what will grow on it. Soil content, and its ecology are both important, but it is worth noting that scientists and local people can look at the world in different ways, and both can be right.

Previous Agro-Insight blog

Recovering from the quinoa boom

Further reading

For more details on the plants that grow on fallowed soil on the Altiplano, see:

Bonifacio, Alejandro, Genaro Aroni, Milton Villca & Jeffery W. Bentley (2022) Recovering from quinoa: Regenerative agricultural research in Bolivia, Journal of Crop Improvement, DOI: 10.1080/15427528.2022.2135155

A related video

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Acknowledgements

Ing. Eliseo Mamani works for the Proinpa Foundation. This work was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation.

CIENCIAS DE SUELO, DIFERENTES PERO CORRECTOS

Jeff Bentley, 23 de abril del 2023

Puede que el suelo sea la base de la agricultura y, por tanto, de casi todos nuestros alimentos, pero los agricultores y los científicos de suelo ven el suelo de formas completamente distintas, aunque igualmente válidas.

Hace poco estuve en Bolivia grabando un vídeo con Paul y Marcella sobre las pruebas de suelo que los agentes de extensión pueden hacer con los agricultores. Nuestro experto local era Eliseo Mamani, un talentoso ingenieroagrónomo boliviano.

Antes de nuestra visita, Eliseo hab√≠a preparado tres pruebas de suelo en colaboraci√≥n con el edaf√≥logo Steve Vanek. Una de las pruebas usa botellas, tamices y telas para separar la “materia org√°nica particulada”, o MOP… migajas de color marr√≥n oscuro de hojarasca vegetal y animal muerta. Las part√≠culas son ricas en carbono, y alimentan a las plantas. La tierra buena tiene m√°s MOP que la tierra pobre.

Para preparar nuestra visita, Eliseo hab√≠a practicado las pruebas de suelo con agricultores locales. Nos present√≥ a Victoria Quispe, que cr√≠a llamas y ovejas con su marido. Le pregunt√© a do√Īa Victoria qu√© era un buen suelo. Pens√© que dir√≠a algo como que tiene mucha materia org√°nica. Tambi√©n podr√≠a haber dicho que tiene un pH neutro, porque una de las pruebas que Eliseo les hab√≠a ense√Īado era usar papel de pH para ver cu√°ndo el suelo es demasiado √°cido o demasiado alcalino.

Pero no, do√Īa Victoria dijo: “Sabemos cu√°ndo la tierra es buena por las plantas que crecen en ella”. La respuesta tiene mucho sentido. Estas comunidades del Altiplano cultivan papas durante un a√Īo, luego quinua durante otro, y despu√©s dejan la tierra en barbecho durante al menos seis a√Īos. En ese tiempo, la pampa alta se cubre de paja brava nativa, y de varias especies de arbustos nativos llamados t’ula.

M√°s tarde, Eliseo llev√≥ a cuatro agricultoras a hacer la prueba de la MOP. Recogieron tierra de un campo bien descansado y de una parcela que hab√≠a sido cultivada recientemente. El grupo lav√≥ una muestra de tierra de cada campo y tamiz√≥ cuidadosamente la MOP, peque√Īos trozos de unos 2 mm de di√°metro. A continuaci√≥n, Eliseo dispuso cuidadosamente las part√≠culas en peque√Īos discos sobre un trozo de tela blanca. La tierra del suelo cansado s√≥lo dio suficiente MOP para hacer un disco de 2 cm de di√°metro. Pero el c√≠rculo de la tierra descansada ten√≠a 6 cm de di√°metro.

En otras palabras, el suelo bien descansado estaba cubierto de plantas nativas y tenía muchas más partículas de materia orgánica que el suelo cansado, que sólo tenía una ligera capa de plantas. La prueba científica y el conocimiento local habían llegado a la misma conclusión: que el barbecho puede mejorar el suelo. Los científicos de suelo tienden a fijarse en de qué está hecho el suelo. Los agricultores se fijan en lo que crece en él. Tanto el contenido del suelo como su ecología son importantes, pero hay que tener en cuenta que los científicos y la población local pueden ver el mundo de formas distintas, y ambos pueden tener razón.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Recuper√°ndose del boom de la quinua

Lectura adicional

Bonifacio, Alejandro, Genaro Aroni, Milton Villca & Jeffery W. Bentley (2022) Recovering from quinoa: Regenerative agricultural research in Bolivia, Journal of Crop Improvement, DOI: 10.1080/15427528.2022.2135155

Un video relacionado al tema

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Agradecimiento

El Dr. Ing. Eliseo Mamani trabaja para la Fundación Proinpa. Este trabajo se hizo con el generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

Organic leaf fertilizer April 16th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Prosuco is a Bolivian organization that teaches farmers organic farming. Few things are more important than encouraging alternatives to chemical pesticides and fertilizers.

So Prosuco teaches farmers to make two products, 1) sulfur lime: water boiled with sulfur and lime and used as a fungicide. Some farmers also find that it is useful as an insecticide. 2) Biofoliar, a fermented solution of cow and guinea pig manure, chopped alfalfa, ground egg shells, ash, and some storebought ingredients: brown sugar, yoghurt, and dry active yeast. After a few months of fermenting in a barrel, the biofoliar is strained and can be mixed in water to spray onto the leaves of plants.

Conventional farmers often buy chemical fertilizer, designed to spray on a growing crop. But this foliar (leaf) chemical fertilizer is another source of impurities in our food, because the chemical is sprayed on the leaves of growing plants, like lettuce and broccoli.

Paul and Marcella and I were with Prosuco recently, making a video in Cebollullo, a community in a narrow, warm valley near La Paz. These organic farmers usually mix biofoliar together with sulfur lime. They rave about the results. The plants grow so fast and healthy, and these home-made remedies are much cheaper than the chemicals from the shop.

The mixture does seem to work. One farmer, do√Īa Ninfa, showed us her broccoli. There were cabbage moths (plutella) flying around it and landing on the leaves. These little moths are the greatest cabbage pest worldwide, and also a broccoli pest. Do√Īa Ninfa has sprayed her broccoli with sulfur lime and biofoliar. I saw very few holes in the plant leaves, typical of plutella damage, but I couldn‚Äôt find any of their larvae, little green worms. So whatever do√Īa Ninfa was doing, it was working.

I do have a couple of questions. I wonder if, besides the nutrients in the biofoliar, if there are also beneficial microorganisms that help the plants? To know that, we would have to assay the microorganisms in the biofoliar, before and after fermenting it. Then we would need to know which microbes are still alive after being mixed with sulfur lime, which is designed to be a fungicide, i.e., to kill disease-causing fungi. The mixture may reduce the number of microorganisms, but this would not affect the quantity of nutrients for the plants. Farmer-researchers of Cebollullo have been testing different ratios of biofoliar and sulfur lime to develop the most efficient control while reducing the number of sprays, to save time and labor. This is important to them because their fields are often far from the road and far from water.

This is not a criticism of Prosuco, but there needs to be more formal research, for example, from universities, on safe, inexpensive, natural fungicides and fertilizers that farmers can make at home, and on the combinations of these inputs.

Agrochemical companies have all the advantages. They co-opt university research. They have their own research scientists as well. They have advertisers and a host of shopkeepers, motivated by the promise of earning money.

Organic agriculture has the good will of the NGOs, working with local people, and the creativity of the farmers themselves. Even a little more support would make a difference.

Previous Agro-Insight blog

Friendly germs

Related videos

Good microbes for plants and soil

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Acknowledgement

Thanks to Roly Cota, Maya Apaza, and Renato Pardo of Prosuco for introducing us to the community of Cebollullo, and for sharing their thoughts on organic agriculture with us. Thanks to María Quispe, the Director of Prosuco, and to Paul Van Mele, for their valuable comments on previous versions of this story. This work was sponsored by the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation.

ABONO FOLIAR ORG√ĀNICO

Jeff Bentley, 9 de abril del 2023

Prosuco es una organizaci√≥n boliviana que ense√Īa la agricultura ecol√≥gica a los agricultores. Pocas cosas son m√°s importantes que fomentar alternativas a los plaguicidas y fertilizantes qu√≠micos.

As√≠, Prosuco ense√Īa a los agricultores a hacer dos productos: 1) sulfoc√°lcico: agua hervida con azufre y cal que se usa como fungicida. Algunos agricultores tambi√©n ven que es √ļtil como insecticida. 2) Biofoliar, una soluci√≥n fermentada de esti√©rcol de vaca y cuyes, alfalfa picada, c√°scaras de huevo molidas, ceniza y algunos ingredientes comprados en la tienda: az√ļcar moreno, yogurt y levadura seca activa. Tras unos meses de fermentaci√≥n en un barril, el biofoliar se cuela y puede mezclarse con agua para fumigarlo sobre las hojas de las plantas.

Los agricultores convencionales suelen comprar fertilizantes qu√≠micos, dise√Īados para fumigar sobre un cultivo en crecimiento. Pero este fertilizante qu√≠mico foliar es otra fuente de contaminaci√≥n en nuestros alimentos, porque el producto qu√≠mico se fumiga sobre las hojas de las plantas en crecimiento, como la lechuga y el br√≥coli.

Paul, Marcella y yo estuvimos hace poco con Prosuco haciendo un video en Cebollullo, una comunidad ubicada en un valle estrecho y cálido cerca de La Paz. Estos agricultores ecológicos suelen mezclar biofoliar con sulfocálcio. Están encantados con los resultados. Las plantas crecen muy rápido y sanas, y estos remedios caseros son mucho más baratos que los productos químicos de la tienda.

La mezcla parece funcionar. Una agricultora, do√Īa Ninfa, nos ense√Ī√≥ su br√≥coli. Hab√≠a polillas del repollo (plutella) volando alrededor y pos√°ndose en las hojas. Estas peque√Īas polillas son la mayor plaga del repollo en todo el mundo, y tambi√©n del br√≥coli. Do√Īa Ninfa ha fumigado su br√≥coli con sulfoc√°lcico y biofoliar. Vi muy pocos agujeros en las hojas de la planta, t√≠picos de los da√Īos de la plutella, pero no encontr√© ninguna de sus larvas, peque√Īos gusanos verdes. Sea lo que sea, lo que do√Īa Ninfa hac√≠a, le daba buenos resultados.

Tengo un par de preguntas. Me pregunto si, adem√°s de los nutrientes del biofoliar ¬Ņhay tambi√©n microorganismos buenos que ayuden a las plantas? Para saberlo, tendr√≠amos que analizar los microorganismos del biofoliar, antes y despu√©s de fermentarlo. Entonces necesitar√≠amos saber qu√© microorganismos siguen vivos despu√©s de ser mezclados con el sulfoc√°lcico, que est√° dise√Īada para ser un fungicida, es decir, para matar hongos causantes de enfermedades. La mezcla puede que reduzca microorganismos, pero eso no debe bajar la cantidad de nutrientes favorables para las plantas. Agricultores investigadores de Cebollullo han estado probando relaciones de biofoliar y caldo sulfoc√°lcico para desarrollar un control m√°s eficiente y reducir el n√ļmero de fumigaciones, para ahorrar tiempo y trabajo, ya que sus parcelas son de dif√≠cil acceso, y lejos de las fuentes de agua. ¬†¬†.

Esto no es una crítica a Prosuco, pero es necesario que haya más investigación formal, por ejemplo, de las universidades, sobre los fungicidas y abonos seguros, baratos y naturales que los agricultores puedan hacer en casa y sobre las combinaciones de estos insumos.

Las empresas agroquímicas tienen todas las ventajas. Cooptan la investigación universitaria. También tienen sus propios investigadores. Tienen propaganda en los medios masivos y una gran red de distribución comercial, con vendedores motivados por la meta de ganar dinero.

La agricultura ecológica tiene la buena voluntad de las ONGs, que trabajan con la población local, y con la creatividad de los propios agricultores. Un poco más de apoyo haría la diferencia.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Microbios amigables

Videos relacionados

Buenos microbios para plantas y suelo

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Agradecimiento

Gracias a Roly Cota, Maya Apaza, y Renato Pardo de Prosuco por presentarnos a la comunidad de Cebollullo, y por compartir sus ideas sobre la agricultura orgánica con nosotros. Gracias a María Quispe, Directora de Prosuco, y Paul Van Mele, por leer y hacer valiosos comentarios sobre versiones previas de este relato. Este trabajo fue auspiciado por el Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

 

Design by Olean webdesign