WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Neighborhood trees August 20th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Trees make a city feel like a decent place to live. That often means planting the trees, which help to cool cities, sequester carbon and provide a habitat for birds and other wildlife. But large-scale tree planting in a city can be difficult.

Cochabamba, Bolivia is one of many fast-growing, tropical cities. In the not-too-distant future, most of the world’s people may live in a city like this. Cochabamba is nestled in a large Andean valley, but in the last twenty years, the city has also spread into the nearby Sacaba Valley, which was formerly devoted to growing rainfed wheat. As late as the 1990s, the small town of Sacaba was just a few blocks wide. Now 220,000 people live in that valley, which has become part of metropolitan Cochabamba. The wheat fields of Sacaba have been replaced by a maze of asphalt streets, and neat homes of brick, cement and tile.

I was in Sacaba recently with my wife Ana, who introduced me to some people who are planting trees along the banks of a dry wash, the Waych’a Mayu. It was once a seasonal stream, but it is now dry all year. It has been blocked upstream by people who have built streets and causeways over it.

For the past 18 months, an architect, Alain Vimercati, and an agroforester, Ariel Ayma, have been working with local neighborhoods in Sacaba to organize tree planting. That included many meetings with the leaders and the residents of 12 grassroots neighborhood associations (OTBs‚ÄĒorganizaciones territoriales de base) to plan the project.

They decided to plant trees along the Waych’a Mayu, which still had some remnant forests of dryland trees, like molle and jarka. The local people had seen some of the long, shady parks in the older parts of Cochabamba. They were excited to have a green belt, five kilometers long, running through their own neighborhoods. Alain and Ariel, with the NGO Pro Hábitat, produced 2,400 tree seedlings in partnership with the local, public forestry school (ESFOR-UMSS). The local people dug the holes, planted the trees, and built small protective fences around them.

The trees were planted in January. In July, Ana and I went with about 20 people from some of the OTBs to see how the seedlings were doing. When we reached the line of trees, Ariel, the agro-forester, pointed out that the trees had more than doubled in size in just six months. Eighty percent of them had survived. But now they had to be maintained. It has been a dry year, and it hasn‚Äôt rained for five months. The trees were starting to wilt. Even so, Ariel encouraged the people by saying ‚Äúmaintenance is more important than water.‚ÄĚ He meant that while the trees did need some water, they also needed to be protected. It is important to reassure people that they won‚Äôt have to spend money on water. Many people in Sacaba have to buy their water. As we met, cistern trucks drove up and down the streets, offering 200 liters of water for 7 Bolivianos ($1).

The seedlings include a few hardy lemons, but most of the other species are native, dryland trees: guava, broadleaf hopbush (chacatea), jacaranda, tara, tipa, and ceibo.

Ariel used a pick and shovel to show the group how to clear a half-moon around the trees, to catch rain water. He has a Ph.D. in agroforestry, but he seems to love the physical work.

Ariel cut the weeds from around the first tree, and placed them around the base of the trunk, to shade the soil. The representatives from the OTBs, including a retired man, and a woman carrying a baby, quickly agreed to meet a week later, and to bring more people from each neighborhood, to help take care of the trees.

Ana and I went back the following Saturday. A Bolivian bank had paid for a tanker truck of water (16,000 liters, worth about $44). I was surprised how many people turned out, as many as fifteen or twenty at some OTBs. They used their own picks and shovels to quickly clean out the hole around each tree. Then they waited for the tanker truck to fill their barrels so the people from the neighborhoods could give each thirsty tree a bucketful of water. Ariel explained that a bit of water the first year will help the trees recover from the shock of being transplanted, then they should normally survive on rain water. The neighbors did feel a sense of ownership. Some of them told us that they occasionally poured a bucket of recycled water on the trees near their homes.

Ariel is also a professor of forestry, and some of his students had come to help advise the local people. But the residents did most of the work, and in most OTBs the trees were soon weeded and ready to be watered.

The people have settled in Sacaba from all over highland Bolivia, from Oruro, La Paz, Potosí and rural parts of Cochabamba. They have organized themselves into OTBs, which made it possible for Alain and Ariel to work with the neighborhood associations to plan the greenbelt and plant the trees. The cell phone also helps. A few years ago, people had to be invited by a local leader going door-to-door. At those few neighborhoods where no one showed up, Alain phoned the leader of the OTB, who rang up the neighbors. Sometimes within half an hour of making the first phone call, people were digging out the holes around each tree.

In the rapidly-growing cities of the developing world, many of the new residents are from farming communities, and they have rural skills, useful when planting trees. Their new neighborhoods will be much nicer places to live if they have trees. Hopefully, as this case shows, the tree species will be well suited to the local environment, and the local people will be empowered with a sense of ownership of their green areas.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Alain Vimercati and Ariel Ayma of Pro H√°bitat, and to all the people who are planting and caring for the trees.

Scientific names

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (previously Acacia visco)

Guava Psidium guajava

Broadleaf hopbush (common name in Bolivia: chacatea), Dodonaea viscosa

Jacaranda Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-galli

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The cherry on the pie

Experiments with trees

The right way to distribute trees

Videos on caring for trees

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Flowering plants attract the insects that help us

Demi lunes

Managed regeneration

ARBOLES DEL BARRIO

Jeff Bentley, 20 de agosto del 2023

Los árboles hacen que una ciudad sea más amena. A menudo hay que plantar los árboles, que ayudan a refrescar las ciudades, capturar carbono y crear un hábitat para la vida silvestre, como las aves. Pero plantar árboles a gran escala en una ciudad puede ser difícil.

Cochabamba, Bolivia es una de las muchas ciudades tropicales de r√°pido crecimiento. En un futuro pr√≥ximo, la mayor parte de la poblaci√≥n mundial podr√≠a vivir en una ciudad como √©sta. Cochabamba est√° anidada en un gran valle andino, pero en los √ļltimos veinte a√Īos la ciudad se ha extendido tambi√©n al cercano valle de Sacaba, antes sembrado en trigo de secano. En la d√©cada de los 1990, la peque√Īa ciudad de Sacaba s√≥lo ten√≠a unas manzanas de ancho. Ahora viven 220.000 personas en ese valle, que ha pasado a formar parte de la zona metropolitana de Cochabamba. Los trigales de Sacaba han sido sustituidos por un laberinto de calles asfaltadas y bonitas casas de ladrillo, cemento y teja.

Hace poco estuve en Sacaba con mi esposa Ana, que me present√≥ a unas personas que est√°n plantando √°rboles a orillas de un arroyo seco, el Waych’a Mayu. Antes era un arroyo estacional, pero ahora est√° seco todo el a√Īo. Ha sido bloqueado r√≠o arriba por personas que han construido calles y terraplenes sobre el curso del agua.

Durante los √ļltimos 18 meses, un arquitecto, Alain Vimercati, y un doctor en ciencias silvoagropecuarias, Ariel Ayma, han trabajado con los vecinos de Sacaba para organizar la plantaci√≥n de √°rboles. Eso incluy√≥ varias reuniones con los l√≠deres y los residentes de 12 organizaciones territoriales de base (OTBs) para planificar el proyecto.

Decidieron plantar √°rboles a lo largo del Waych’a Mayu, que a√ļn conservaba algunos bosques remanentes de √°rboles de secano, como molle y jarka. La poblaci√≥n local hab√≠a visto algunos de los largos parques arboleados de las zonas m√°s antiguas de Cochabamba. Estaban entusiasmados con la idea de tener un cintur√≥n verde de cinco kil√≥metros que atravesara sus barrios de ellos. Alain y Ariel, con la ONG Pro H√°bitat, produjeron 2.400 plantines de √°rboles en coordinaci√≥n con la Escuela de Ciencias Forestales (ESFOR-UMSS). Los vecinos cavaron los hoyos, plantaron los √°rboles y construyeron peque√Īos cercos protectores alrededor de cada uno.

Los √°rboles se plantaron en enero. En julio, Ana y yo fuimos con unas 20 personas de algunas de las OTBs a ver c√≥mo iban los plantines. Cuando llegamos a la l√≠nea de √°rboles, Ariel nos dijo que los √°rboles hab√≠an duplicado su tama√Īo en s√≥lo seis meses. El 80% hab√≠a sobrevivido. Pero ahora hab√≠a que mantenerlos. Ha sido un a√Īo seco y no ha llovido en cinco meses. Los √°rboles empezaban a marchitarse. Aun as√≠, Ariel anim√≥ a la gente diciendo que “el mantenimiento es m√°s importante que el agua”. Quer√≠a decir que, aunque los √°rboles necesitaban agua, tambi√©n hab√≠a que protegerlos. Es importante asegurar a la gente que no tendr√° que gastar dinero en agua. Muchos habitantes de Sacaba tienen que comprar el agua. Mientras nos reun√≠amos, camiones cisterna recorr√≠an las calles ofreciendo 200 litros de agua por 7 bolivianos (1 d√≥lar).

Entre los plantines hay algunos limones resistentes, pero la mayoría de las demás especies son árboles nativos de secano: guayaba, chacatea, jacarandá, tara, tipa y ceibo.

Ariel usó una picota y una pala para mostrar al grupo cómo limpiar una media luna alrededor de los árboles, para recoger el agua de lluvia. Tiene un doctorado, pero parece que le encanta el trabajo físico.

Ariel cortó el monte de alrededor del primer árbol y colocó la challa alrededor de la base del tronco, para dar sombra al suelo. Los representantes de las OTB, entre ellos un jubilado y una mujer con un bebé a cuestas, acordaron rápidamente reunirse una semana más tarde y traer a más gente de cada barrio para ayudar a cuidar los árboles.

Ana y yo volvimos el s√°bado siguiente. Un banco boliviano hab√≠a pagado un cami√≥n cisterna de agua (16.000 litros, por valor de unos 300 Bolivianos‚ÄĒ44 d√≥lares). Me sorprendi√≥ la cantidad de gente que acudi√≥, hasta quince o veinte en algunas OTBs. Usaron sus propias palas y picotas para limpiar r√°pidamente el agujero alrededor de cada √°rbol. Luego esperaron a que el cami√≥n cisterna llenara sus barriles para que los vecinos pudieran dar a cada √°rbol sediento un cubo lleno de agua. Ariel explic√≥ que un poco de agua el primer a√Īo ayudar√≠a a los √°rboles a recuperarse del shock de ser trasplantados, y que despu√©s deber√≠an sobrevivir normalmente con el agua de lluvia. Los vecinos estaban empezando a cuidar a los arbolitos. Algunos nos contaron que de vez en cuando echaban un cubo de agua reciclada en los √°rboles cercanos a sus casas.

Ariel es tambi√©n profesor universitario, y algunos de sus alumnos hab√≠an venido a ayudar a asesorar a los lugare√Īos. Pero los residentes hicieron la mayor parte del trabajo, y en la mayor√≠a de las OTBs los √°rboles pronto estaban limpiados y listos para ser regados.

La gente se ha asentado en Sacaba de toda la parte alta de Bolivia, de Oruro, La Paz, Potos√≠ y zonas rurales de Cochabamba. Se han organizado en OTBs, lo que ha permitido a Alain y Ariel trabajar con ellos para planificar el cintur√≥n verde y plantar los √°rboles. El celular tambi√©n ayuda. Hace unos a√Īos, la gente ten√≠a que ser invitada por un dirigente local que iba puerta en puerta. En los pocos barrios donde no aparec√≠a nadie, Alain telefoneaba al dirigente de la OTB, que llamaba a los vecinos. A veces, media hora despu√©s de la primera llamada, la gente ya estaba cavando los agujeros alrededor de cada √°rbol.

En las ciudades de r√°pido crecimiento del mundo en v√≠as del desarrollo, muchos de los nuevos residentes vienen de comunidades agr√≠colas y tienen conocimientos rurales, √ļtiles a la hora de plantar √°rboles. Sus nuevos barrios ser√°n lugares mucho m√°s agradables para vivir si tienen √°rboles. Ojal√° que, como demuestra este caso, las especies arb√≥reas se adapten bien al ambiente local y la gente local sea empoderada para adue√Īarse de sus √°reas verdes.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Alain Vimercati y Ariel Ayma de Pro H√°bitat, y a todos los vecinos que plantan y cuidan sus √°rboles.

Nombres científicos

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (antes Acacia visco)

Guayaba Psidium guajava

Chacatea Dodonaea viscosa

Jacarand√° Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-gall

También en el blog de Agro-Insight

The cherry on the pie

Experimentos con √°rboles

La manera correcta de distribuir los √°rboles

Videos sobre el cuidado de los √°rboles

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Las plantas con flores atraen a los insectos que nos ayudan

Medias lunas

Regeneración manejada

 

Seeing the life in the soil June 25th, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Earlier, Jeff and I have written various blogs about the importance of soil organic matter and soil life to support  thriving, sustainable food production. Soils that have many living organisms hold more carbon and nutrients and can better absorb and retain rainwater, all of which are crucial in these times of a disturbed climate.

But measuring life in soils can be a time-consuming activity depending on what one wants to measure. While bacteria and fungi cannot be seen by the naked eye, ants, grubs and earth worms can.

In one of the training videos that we filmed in Bolivia last February, Eliseo Mamani from the PROINPA Foundation, a science and technology organization, shows us meticulously how you can measure the visible soil organisms with farmers. Using a standardised method to measure soil life is important if you want to evaluate how certain farming practices have an effect on the life of your soil.

One early morning, we pick up Ana Mamani and Rubén Chipana from their homes to take us to a field on the altiplano that has been cultivated for various years and that has not received any organic fertilizer. The farmers of Chiarumani, Patacamaya, about 100 kilometres south of La Paz, have learned through collaborative research that there are more living things in some parts of the field, and fewer in other parts, so they take samples from 3 parts of the field.

With a spade they remove a block of soil 20 centimetres wide, 20 centimetres long and 20 centimetres deep. They carefully put all this soil in a white bag and close it tightly, so that the living things do not escape, because the earthworms and other living things move quickly.

We then drive to another place, where they collect 3 more samples from a field that has received organic fertilizer and where organic vegetables are grown. All samples are put in blue bags, all nicely labelled.

Under the shade of a tree, some more farmers have gathered to start counting the living organisms. One handful of soil at a time, they empty each bag on a plastic tray. As they come across a living creature, they carefully pick it out and report it to Eliseo who takes notes: how many earthworms, how many ants, how many termites, how many beetles, how many spiders and how many grubs.

After an hour, the results are added up and samples compared: there are only many earthworms in the soil from the field that received organic fertilizer. The farmers discuss the findings in group and conclude: If your soil has few living things, you can bring your soil to life by adding animal manure or compost, by leaving crop residues in the field, and not burning them. You can also improve soil life by ploughing less, as ploughing disturbs bacteria, fungi, and animals that add fertility to the soil.

After returning back home from our trip to Bolivia, I am still reflecting on the many things we have learned from farmers and the organisations who do basic, yet relevant research with them, when Marcella points to the fields in front of our office. In March, at the onset of spring, moles are most active. It is striking: the field to the left that hasn’t been ploughed or fertilized for several years has many mole hills. The field on the right is intensively managed and does not have a single mole hill. Ploughing reduces organic matter, which is feed for earthworms. Herbicides and pesticides kill soil life, including earthworms. Also, liquid manure, which is used abundantly across Flanders and the Netherlands, can kill earthworms, especially when cows have received antibiotics and other drugs. Liquid manure may also contain heavy metals used for animal feed, such as zinc and copper.

Earthworms can be counted and used as soil health bioindicators. When done in collaborative research with farmer groups this helps farmers understand how certain farming practices affects the health of their soil and the long-term sustainability of their farm. However, if you don’t have time to go out with a spade to take soil samples, even above ground indicators such as mole hills can offer a quick alternative.

Acknowledgements

The visit to Bolivia to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one, was made possible with the generous support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to the Foundation for the Promotion and Research of Andean Products (PROINPA) who introduced us to the communities, and to Eliseo Mamani in particular who led the soil exercises with the farmers for this video.

Related videos

Seeing the life in the soil

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Soil science, different but right

Killing the soil with chemicals (and bringing it back to life)

Commercialising organic inputs

 

Het leven in de bodem zien

Jeff en ik hebben al eerder verschillende blogs geschreven over het belang van organische stof in de bodem en bodemleven om duurzame voedselproductie te ondersteunen. Bodems met veel levende organismen houden meer koolstof en voedingsstoffen vast en kunnen regenwater beter absorberen en vasthouden, wat allemaal cruciaal is in deze tijden van een verstoord klimaat.

Maar het meten van het leven in de bodem kan een tijdrovende bezigheid zijn, afhankelijk van wat men wil meten. Terwijl bacteri√ęn en schimmels niet met het blote oog te zien zijn, zijn mieren, larven en regenwormen dat wel.

In een van de trainingsvideo’s die we afgelopen februari in Bolivia hebben gefilmd, laat Eliseo Mamani van PROINPA, een wetenschappelijk en technologisch instituut, nauwkeurig zien hoe je samen met boeren de zichtbare bodemorganismen kunt meten. Het gebruik van een gestandaardiseerde methode om het bodemleven te meten is belangrijk als je wilt evalueren welk effect bepaalde landbouwpraktijken hebben op het bodemleven.

Op een vroege ochtend halen we Ana Mamani en Rubén Chipana op van hun huis om ons naar een veld op de altiplano te brengen dat al verschillende jaren wordt bewerkt en waar geen organische meststoffen zijn gebruikt. De boeren van Chiarumani, Patacamaya, ongeveer 100 kilometer ten zuiden van La Paz, hebben door gezamenlijk onderzoek geleerd dat er in sommige delen van het veld meer levende wezens zijn en in andere delen minder, dus nemen ze monsters van 3 delen van het veld.

Met een spade halen ze een blok grond weg van 20 centimeter breed, 20 centimeter lang en 20 centimeter diep. Ze doen al deze grond voorzichtig in een witte zak en sluiten deze goed af, zodat de levende wezens niet kunnen ontsnappen, want de regenwormen en andere levende wezens verplaatsen zich snel.

Daarna rijden we naar een andere plek, waar ze nog 3 monsters verzamelen van een veld dat organische mest heeft gekregen en waar organische groenten worden verbouwd. Alle monsters worden in blauwe zakken gedaan, allemaal netjes gelabeld.

Onder de schaduw van een boom hebben zich nog meer boeren verzameld om te beginnen met het tellen van de levende organismen. Een handvol grond per keer legen ze elke zak op een plastic dienblad. Als ze een levend wezen tegenkomen, pikken ze het er voorzichtig uit en rapporteren het aan Eliseo die aantekeningen maakt: hoeveel regenwormen, hoeveel mieren, hoeveel termieten, hoeveel kevers, hoeveel spinnen en hoeveel engerlingen.

Na een uur worden de resultaten opgeteld en de monsters vergeleken: er zitten alleen veel regenwormen in de grond van het veld dat organische mest heeft gekregen. De boeren bespreken de bevindingen in groep en concluderen: Als je bodem weinig levende wezens heeft, kun je je bodem tot leven brengen door dierlijke mest of compost toe te voegen, door gewasresten op het veld te laten liggen en ze niet te verbranden. Je kunt het bodemleven ook verbeteren door minder te ploegen, want ploegen verstoort bacteri√ęn, schimmels en dieren die vruchtbaarheid aan de bodem toevoegen.

Na terugkomst van onze reis naar Bolivia ben ik nog steeds aan het nadenken over de vele dingen die we hebben geleerd van boeren en de organisaties die samen met hen eenvoudig, maar relevant onderzoek doen, als Marcella naar de velden voor ons kantoor wijst. In maart, aan het begin van de lente, zijn de mollen het actiefst. Het is opvallend: het veld links, dat al een paar jaar niet geploegd of bemest is, heeft veel molshopen. Het veld rechts wordt intensief beheerd en heeft geen enkele molshoop. Door ploegen vermindert het organisch materiaal, dat voedsel is voor regenwormen. Herbiciden en pesticiden doden het bodemleven, waaronder regenwormen. Ook vloeibare mest, die in heel Vlaanderen en Nederland overvloedig wordt gebruikt, kan regenwormen doden, vooral wanneer koeien antibiotica en andere medicijnen hebben gekregen. Vloeibare mest kan ook zware metalen bevatten die worden gebruikt voor diervoeder, zoals zink en koper.

Regenwormen kunnen worden geteld en gebruikt als bio-indicatoren voor de gezondheid van de bodem. Wanneer dit in samenwerking met boerengroepen wordt gedaan, helpt dit boeren te begrijpen hoe bepaalde landbouwpraktijken de gezondheid van hun bodem en de duurzaamheid van hun boerderij op de lange termijn be√Įnvloeden. Maar indien je geen tijd hebt om bodemmonsters te nemen met een spade, bieden bovengrondse indicatoren zoals molshopen een snel alternatief.

Bekijk de video

Seeing the life in the soil

Soil science, different but right April 23rd, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Soil may be the basis of farming, and therefore of almost all of our food, but farmers and soil scientists see the soil in completely different, if equally valid ways.

In Bolivia, I was recently making a video with Paul and Marcella on soil tests that extension agents can do with farmers. Our local expert was Eliseo Mamani, a gifted Bolivian agronomist.

Before our visit, Eliseo had prepared three soil tests in collaboration with soil scientist Steve Vanek. One of the tests uses bottles and sieves and cloth to separate out the ‚Äúparticulate organic matter‚ÄĚ, or POM ‚Ķ dark brown crumbs of carbon-rich, dead plant and animal litter that feed the plants. Good soil has more POM than poor soil.

In preparation for our visit, Eliseo had been practicing the soil tests with local farmers. He introduced us to Victoria Quispe, who farms and herds llamas and sheep with her husband. I asked do√Īa Victoria what made a good soil. I thought she might say something like its rich organic matter. She could have also said it has neutral pH, because one of the tests Eliseo had taught them was to use pH paper to see when soil is too acidic or too alkaline.

But no, do√Īa Victoria said, ‚ÄúWe know when the soil is good by the plants growing on it.‚ÄĚ The answer makes perfect sense. These communities on the high Altiplano grow potatoes for a year, then quinoa for a year, and then they fallow the land for at least six years. In that time, the high pampas become covered with native needle grass, and various species of native brush called t‚Äôula.

Later in the day, Eliseo led four farmers to do the POM test. They collected soil from a well-rested field and from one that had been recently cultivated. The group washed a sample of soil from each field and carefully sieved out the POM, little pieces about 2 mm across. Then Eliseo carefully arranged the particles into small disks on a piece of white paper. The soil from the tired soil yielded only enough POM to make a disk of 2 cm in diameter. But the circle from the rested soil was 6 cm across.

In other words, the well-rested soil was covered in native plants, and it had lots more particulate organic matter than the tired soil, which had only a light covering of plants. The scientific test and local knowledge had reached the same conclusion, that fallow can improve the soil. Soil scientists tend to look at what soil is made of. Farmers notice what will grow on it. Soil content, and its ecology are both important, but it is worth noting that scientists and local people can look at the world in different ways, and both can be right.

Previous Agro-Insight blog

Recovering from the quinoa boom

Further reading

For more details on the plants that grow on fallowed soil on the Altiplano, see:

Bonifacio, Alejandro, Genaro Aroni, Milton Villca & Jeffery W. Bentley (2022) Recovering from quinoa: Regenerative agricultural research in Bolivia, Journal of Crop Improvement, DOI: 10.1080/15427528.2022.2135155

A related video

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Acknowledgements

Ing. Eliseo Mamani works for the Proinpa Foundation. This work was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation.

CIENCIAS DE SUELO, DIFERENTES PERO CORRECTOS

Jeff Bentley, 23 de abril del 2023

Puede que el suelo sea la base de la agricultura y, por tanto, de casi todos nuestros alimentos, pero los agricultores y los científicos de suelo ven el suelo de formas completamente distintas, aunque igualmente válidas.

Hace poco estuve en Bolivia grabando un vídeo con Paul y Marcella sobre las pruebas de suelo que los agentes de extensión pueden hacer con los agricultores. Nuestro experto local era Eliseo Mamani, un talentoso ingenieroagrónomo boliviano.

Antes de nuestra visita, Eliseo hab√≠a preparado tres pruebas de suelo en colaboraci√≥n con el edaf√≥logo Steve Vanek. Una de las pruebas usa botellas, tamices y telas para separar la “materia org√°nica particulada”, o MOP… migajas de color marr√≥n oscuro de hojarasca vegetal y animal muerta. Las part√≠culas son ricas en carbono, y alimentan a las plantas. La tierra buena tiene m√°s MOP que la tierra pobre.

Para preparar nuestra visita, Eliseo hab√≠a practicado las pruebas de suelo con agricultores locales. Nos present√≥ a Victoria Quispe, que cr√≠a llamas y ovejas con su marido. Le pregunt√© a do√Īa Victoria qu√© era un buen suelo. Pens√© que dir√≠a algo como que tiene mucha materia org√°nica. Tambi√©n podr√≠a haber dicho que tiene un pH neutro, porque una de las pruebas que Eliseo les hab√≠a ense√Īado era usar papel de pH para ver cu√°ndo el suelo es demasiado √°cido o demasiado alcalino.

Pero no, do√Īa Victoria dijo: “Sabemos cu√°ndo la tierra es buena por las plantas que crecen en ella”. La respuesta tiene mucho sentido. Estas comunidades del Altiplano cultivan papas durante un a√Īo, luego quinua durante otro, y despu√©s dejan la tierra en barbecho durante al menos seis a√Īos. En ese tiempo, la pampa alta se cubre de paja brava nativa, y de varias especies de arbustos nativos llamados t’ula.

M√°s tarde, Eliseo llev√≥ a cuatro agricultoras a hacer la prueba de la MOP. Recogieron tierra de un campo bien descansado y de una parcela que hab√≠a sido cultivada recientemente. El grupo lav√≥ una muestra de tierra de cada campo y tamiz√≥ cuidadosamente la MOP, peque√Īos trozos de unos 2 mm de di√°metro. A continuaci√≥n, Eliseo dispuso cuidadosamente las part√≠culas en peque√Īos discos sobre un trozo de tela blanca. La tierra del suelo cansado s√≥lo dio suficiente MOP para hacer un disco de 2 cm de di√°metro. Pero el c√≠rculo de la tierra descansada ten√≠a 6 cm de di√°metro.

En otras palabras, el suelo bien descansado estaba cubierto de plantas nativas y tenía muchas más partículas de materia orgánica que el suelo cansado, que sólo tenía una ligera capa de plantas. La prueba científica y el conocimiento local habían llegado a la misma conclusión: que el barbecho puede mejorar el suelo. Los científicos de suelo tienden a fijarse en de qué está hecho el suelo. Los agricultores se fijan en lo que crece en él. Tanto el contenido del suelo como su ecología son importantes, pero hay que tener en cuenta que los científicos y la población local pueden ver el mundo de formas distintas, y ambos pueden tener razón.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Recuper√°ndose del boom de la quinua

Lectura adicional

Bonifacio, Alejandro, Genaro Aroni, Milton Villca & Jeffery W. Bentley (2022) Recovering from quinoa: Regenerative agricultural research in Bolivia, Journal of Crop Improvement, DOI: 10.1080/15427528.2022.2135155

Un video relacionado al tema

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Agradecimiento

El Dr. Ing. Eliseo Mamani trabaja para la Fundación Proinpa. Este trabajo se hizo con el generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

The chaquitaclla June 26th, 2022 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

When the Spanish conquered Peru, they found native people working the soil with a tool built around a long pole, called the chaquitaclla. Usually rendered into English as the ‚ÄúAndean foot plow,‚ÄĚ the chaquitaclla doesn‚Äôt quite plow a furrow, but in the hands (and feet) of a skilled operator it¬† does neatly loosen one large block of sod at a time, which is then turned over by a helper.

We met one such person recently in the mountains of Hu√°nuco, in the community of Tres de Mayo, Huayllacay√°n. Francisco Poma, a local farmer, took time off one day to demonstrate the foot plow for a group of school children.

The potato harvest was just ending, but one farmer, Eustaquio Hilario Ponciano and his family had graciously waited to harvest one small field of native potatoes, so that Paul, Marcella and I could film it.

Although it was not planting season, don Francisco and don Eustaquio next demonstrated how to plant with a chaquitaclla using a minimum tillage system called ‚Äúchiwi‚ÄĚ in which potatoes are planted without completely disturbing the soil. Don Francisco put the blade of the tool on the soil, stepped on the jaruna (foot pedal) while holding onto the uysha (the handle), and the metal blade sunk into the earth. Don Francisco turned over the chunk of soil, while don Eustaquio nestled a seed potato into the hole and then covered it up with the sod, grassy side down, patting it into place with the palms of his hands.

Modern Peru has tractors and the whole array of contemporary farm implements, but the ancient foot plow survives because it fits a purpose. It can work steep slopes, small fields, and it can reach right up to the edge of the field, taking advantage of precious land that a tractor misses.

Like any other technology, the chaquitaclla survives because it fills a function, and no better tool has yet been invented to replace it. It gently works steep, fragile soils, while keeping large chunks of earth intact.

Like other technologies, even old ones, the chaquitaclla also continues to evolve. The blade of pre-Hispanic ones were made of stone. Don Francisco explains that this one is made by a local blacksmith from a steel strip recycled from a truck‚Äôs shock absorber. The main pole of the chaquitaclla is now often made of eucalyptus, a strong, straight and light wood that was unknown to pre-Columbian Peruvians. The hand and foot holds were once tied to the main pole with llama rawhide. Sometimes they still are, but don Francisco shows me several chaquitacllas, including one tied together with nylon twine. He explained ‚Äúwhen we leave the chaquitaclla in the field, sometimes the dogs eat the rawhide. They don‚Äôt eat this one made from synthetic twine.‚ÄĚ

Ancient tools are kept not out of nostalgia, but because they fill a niche, and because local people adapt them, incorporating new materials into old devices.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

The school garden

The enemies of innovation

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos with farmers like don Feliciano was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Dante Flores of the Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) and to Aldo Cruz of the Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas √Āridas (CIZA) for introducing us to the community and for sharing their knowledge with us. Dante Flores and Paul Van Mele read a previous version of this blog and made valuable comments.

LA CHAQUITACLLA

Jeff Bentley, 26 de junio del 2022

Cuando los espa√Īoles conquistaron al Per√ļ, encontraron a la gente trabajando la tierra con una herramienta de madera larga llamada ‚Äúchaquitaclla‚ÄĚ, que suele traducirse al espa√Īol como “arado de pie,” no llega a arar un surco, pero en manos (y pies) de un operador habiloso, afloja limpiamente un gran bloque de tierra ¬†que luego es volteado a mano por un ayudante

Hace poco conocimos a un experto en la chaquitaclla en la sierra de Huánuco, en la comunidad de Tres de Mayo, Huayllacayán. Francisco Poma, un agricultor del lugar, se tomó un día para demostrar el arado de pie a un grupo de estudiantes de primaria.

La cosecha de papas se estaba acabando, pero un agricultor, Eustaquio Hilario Ponciano, y su familia amablemente hab√≠an esperado a cosechar una peque√Īa chacra de papas nativas para que Paul, Marcella y yo pudi√©ramos filmarles.

Aunque no era √©poca de siembra, don Francisco y don Eustaquio demostraron a continuaci√≥n c√≥mo se siembra con una chaquitaclla en el sistema de siembra llamada ‚Äúchiwi‚ÄĚ una especie de labranza m√≠nima que no remueve todo el terreno). Don Francisco puso la hoja de la herramienta sobre la tierra, pis√≥ la jaruna (pedal) mientras se sujetaba a la uysha (la agarradera), y la punta met√°lica se hundi√≥ en la tierra. Don Francisco volc√≥ el terr√≥n, mientras que don Eustaquio meti√≥ una papa semilla en el hoyo y luego la cubri√≥ con el pedazo de tierra, d√°ndole golpecitos con las palmas de las manos.

El Per√ļ moderno tiene tractores y todos los implementos agr√≠colas contempor√°neos, pero el antiguo arado de pie sobrevive porque tiene un prop√≥sito. Puede trabajar en laderas empinadas, en campos peque√Īos y puede preparar hasta el borde de la chacra, aprovechando el espacio mejor que un tractor.

Como cualquier otra tecnología, la chaquitaclla sobrevive porque cumple una función, y todavía no se ha inventado ninguna herramienta mejor para sustituirla. Trabaja suavemente los suelos inclinados y frágiles, manteniendo intactos grandes trozos de tierra.

Como otras tecnolog√≠as, incluso las m√°s antiguas, la chaquitaclla tambi√©n sigue evolucionando. En tiempos prehisp√°nicos, la punta era de piedra. Don Francisco explica que la suya la ha fabricado un herrero local con acero reciclado de un muelle de cami√≥n. Hoy en d√≠a el palo principal de la chaquitaclla se hace de eucalipto, una madera fuerte, recta y ligera que era desconocida para los peruanos precolombinos. La jaruna y la uysha se ataban al palo con cuero crudo de llama. A veces todav√≠a lo est√°n, pero don Francisco me muestra varias chaquitacllas, incluida una atada con hilo de nylon. Me explica que “cuando dejamos la chaquitaclla en el campo, a veces los perros se comen el cuero. No se comen esta, hecha con cuerda sint√©tica”.

Las herramientas antiguas se conservan no por nostalgia, sino porque funcionan, y porque la gente local las adapta, incorporando nuevos materiales a los dispositivos antiguos.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

The school garden

The enemies of innovation

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Per√ļ para filmar varios videos agricultor-a-agricultor con agricultores como don Feliciano fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigaci√≥n de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundaci√≥n McKnight. Gracias a Dante Flores del Instituto de Desarrollo y Medio Ambiente (IDMA) y a Aldo Cruz del Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas √Āridas (CIZA) por presentarnos a la comunidad y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros. Dante Flores y Paul Van Mele leyeron una versi√≥n previa de este relato, e hizo comentarios valiosos.

Good microbes from South Asia to South America May 29th, 2022 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Lifeless soil, worn out by years of tillage and chemical fertilizer, can be brought back to good health with the help of beneficial micro-organisms. A video on that topic, Good microbes for plants and soil, tells how to make a liquid, which is rich in beneficial microbes, that you can apply to your soil and crops. It was filmed in India and is now available in 23 languages, including Spanish.

Diego Mina and Mayra Coro are researchers working closely with smallholder communities in the province of Cotopaxi, Ecuador, where they showed the Spanish version of the microbe video to several groups. Then, Diego and Mayra sent the video to each farmer on WhatsApp, and followed up with a demonstration, where they mixed raw sugar, cow urine, manure and legume flour in a bucket, and fermented it.

One of those farmers was Blanca Chancusig, who has a small farm with maize and guinea pigs, rabbits, a pig and a few dairy cows. Do√Īa Blanca explained how she strained the mix and poured it into recycled plastic bottles. She mixed one liter to 10 liters of water and sprayed it on her maize and lupine crop.

She likes the results so much that she‚Äôs now making it on her own. ‚ÄúWe have all of the ingredients,‚ÄĚ she says.

The recipe in the video calls for chickpea flour, which is common in India, but rare in Ecuador. So Diego and Mayra adapted, explaining to farmers that they could use the flour of any legume, such as broad bean.

‚ÄúThe broad bean flour was the only ingredient we didn‚Äôt have,‚ÄĚ do√Īa Blanca explained, ‚Äúbut we found some.‚ÄĚ

A year after do√Īa Blanca had seen the Indian video, she was still cultivating good microbes on her own, in Ecuador.

I was in Ecuador with Paul and Marcella, filming a video on beneficial insects, featuring do√Īa Blanca and other farmers. We asked her what she thought about watching a video with farmers from other countries. ‚ÄúI thought it was great. I learned a lot,‚ÄĚ she said.

Bureaucrats often tell us that farmers can’t learn from their peers in other countries, mistakenly claiming that videos have to be made over again in each country. Supposedly, farmers can only learn from their own compatriots.

As this example shows, as long as videos are well made, explain principles and are translated into local languages, farmers can learn from innovative smallholders in other countries. Creative agronomists can also facilitate videos, sharing them and helping farmers adapt concepts.

In some ways, it makes more sense to share videos from different countries than from one’s own country, because the ideas are more novel.

Last February, we were in Ecuador filming a video on flowering plants to encourage beneficial insects. It is now available in English, and there may soon be versions in languages of India, which will let South Asian farmers enjoy learning from farmers in South America.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Farmers without borders

Earthworms from India to Bolivia

 

Related videos

Flowering plants attract the insects that help us

The wasp that protects our crops

Good microbes for plants and soil

Healthier crops with good micro-organisms

Buenos microbios, del sur de Asia a Sudamérica

Jeff Bentley, 29 de mayo del 2023

El suelo sin vida, desgastado por a√Īos de labranza y fertilizantes qu√≠micos, puede recuperar su salud con la ayuda de microorganismos buenos. Un video sobre este tema, Buenos microbios para plantas y suelo, explica c√≥mo hacer un l√≠quido rico en microbios ben√©ficos que puede aplicarse a la tierra y a los cultivos. Se film√≥ en la India y ahora est√° disponible en 23 idiomas, incluido el espa√Īol.

Diego Mina y Mayra Coro son investigadores que trabajan en estrecha colaboraci√≥n con las comunidades de peque√Īos agricultores de la provincia de Cotopaxi (Ecuador), donde mostraron la versi√≥n en espa√Īol del video sobre los microbios a varios grupos. Luego, Diego y Mayra enviaron el video a cada agricultor por WhatsApp, y siguieron con una demostraci√≥n, en la que mezclaron az√ļcar cruda, or√≠n de vaca, esti√©rcol y harina de leguminosas en un balde, y lo fermentaron.

Una de esas agricultoras era Blanca Chancusig, que tiene una peque√Īa granja con ma√≠z y cuyes, conejos, un cerdo y algunas vacas lecheras. Do√Īa Blanca explic√≥ c√≥mo colaba la mezcla y la vert√≠a en botellas de pl√°stico recicladas. Mezcla un litro con 10 litros de agua y lo fumiga en su cultivo de ma√≠z y chocho (lupino).

Le gust√≥ tanto el resultado que ahora ella misma hace la mezcla. “Tenemos todos los ingredientes”, dice.

La receta del video requiere harina de garbanzo, que es com√ļn en la India, pero no en Ecuador. As√≠ que Diego y Mayra se adaptaron, explicando a los agricultores que pod√≠an usar la harina de cualquier leguminosa, como la de haba.

“La harina de haba era el √ļnico ingrediente que no ten√≠amos”, explic√≥ do√Īa Blanca, “pero lo encontramos”.

Un a√Īo despu√©s de que do√Īa Blanca viera el video de la India, segu√≠a cultivando buenos microbios por su cuenta, en Ecuador.

Yo estaba en Ecuador con Paul y Marcella, filmando un video sobre insectos ben√©ficos, con do√Īa Blanca y otros agricultores. Le preguntamos qu√© le parec√≠a ver un video con agricultores de otros pa√≠ses. “Me pareci√≥ excellente. Aprend√≠ mucho”, dijo.

Los bur√≥cratas suelen decirnos que los agricultores no pueden aprender de sus compa√Īeros de otros pa√≠ses, insistiendo equivocadamente que los videos tienen que hacerse de nuevo en cada pa√≠s. Supuestamente, los agricultores s√≥lo pueden aprender de sus propios compatriotas.

Como muestra este ejemplo, siempre que los videos estén bien hechos, expliquen los principios básicos y se traduzcan a las lenguas locales, los agricultores pueden aprender de los campesinos innovadores de otros países. Los agrónomos creativos también pueden facilitar los videos, compartiéndolos y ayudando a los agricultores a adaptar los conceptos.

En cierto modo, tiene más sentido compartir videos de otros países que del propio, porque las ideas son más novedosas.

El pasado mes de febrero, estuvimos en Ecuador filmando un video sobre plantas con flores que protegen a los insectos buenos. Ahora está disponible en castellano, kichwa, inglés y francés, y es posible que pronto haya versiones en idiomas de la India, lo que permitirá a los agricultores del sur de Asia disfrutar del aprendizaje de los agricultores de Sudamérica.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Farmers without borders

Lombrices de tierra de India a Bolivia

Related videos

Las plantas con flores atraen a los insectos que nos ayudan

La avispa que protege nuestros cultivos

Buenos microbios para plantas y suelo

Healthier crops with good micro-organisms

 

Design by Olean webdesign