WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Organic leaf fertilizer April 16th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Prosuco is a Bolivian organization that teaches farmers organic farming. Few things are more important than encouraging alternatives to chemical pesticides and fertilizers.

So Prosuco teaches farmers to make two products, 1) sulfur lime: water boiled with sulfur and lime and used as a fungicide. Some farmers also find that it is useful as an insecticide. 2) Biofoliar, a fermented solution of cow and guinea pig manure, chopped alfalfa, ground egg shells, ash, and some storebought ingredients: brown sugar, yoghurt, and dry active yeast. After a few months of fermenting in a barrel, the biofoliar is strained and can be mixed in water to spray onto the leaves of plants.

Conventional farmers often buy chemical fertilizer, designed to spray on a growing crop. But this foliar (leaf) chemical fertilizer is another source of impurities in our food, because the chemical is sprayed on the leaves of growing plants, like lettuce and broccoli.

Paul and Marcella and I were with Prosuco recently, making a video in Cebollullo, a community in a narrow, warm valley near La Paz. These organic farmers usually mix biofoliar together with sulfur lime. They rave about the results. The plants grow so fast and healthy, and these home-made remedies are much cheaper than the chemicals from the shop.

The mixture does seem to work. One farmer, do√Īa Ninfa, showed us her broccoli. There were cabbage moths (plutella) flying around it and landing on the leaves. These little moths are the greatest cabbage pest worldwide, and also a broccoli pest. Do√Īa Ninfa has sprayed her broccoli with sulfur lime and biofoliar. I saw very few holes in the plant leaves, typical of plutella damage, but I couldn‚Äôt find any of their larvae, little green worms. So whatever do√Īa Ninfa was doing, it was working.

I do have a couple of questions. I wonder if, besides the nutrients in the biofoliar, if there are also beneficial microorganisms that help the plants? To know that, we would have to assay the microorganisms in the biofoliar, before and after fermenting it. Then we would need to know which microbes are still alive after being mixed with sulfur lime, which is designed to be a fungicide, i.e., to kill disease-causing fungi. The mixture may reduce the number of microorganisms, but this would not affect the quantity of nutrients for the plants. Farmer-researchers of Cebollullo have been testing different ratios of biofoliar and sulfur lime to develop the most efficient control while reducing the number of sprays, to save time and labor. This is important to them because their fields are often far from the road and far from water.

This is not a criticism of Prosuco, but there needs to be more formal research, for example, from universities, on safe, inexpensive, natural fungicides and fertilizers that farmers can make at home, and on the combinations of these inputs.

Agrochemical companies have all the advantages. They co-opt university research. They have their own research scientists as well. They have advertisers and a host of shopkeepers, motivated by the promise of earning money.

Organic agriculture has the good will of the NGOs, working with local people, and the creativity of the farmers themselves. Even a little more support would make a difference.

Previous Agro-Insight blog

Friendly germs

Related videos

Good microbes for plants and soil

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Acknowledgement

Thanks to Roly Cota, Maya Apaza, and Renato Pardo of Prosuco for introducing us to the community of Cebollullo, and for sharing their thoughts on organic agriculture with us. Thanks to María Quispe, the Director of Prosuco, and to Paul Van Mele, for their valuable comments on previous versions of this story. This work was sponsored by the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation.

ABONO FOLIAR ORG√ĀNICO

Jeff Bentley, 9 de abril del 2023

Prosuco es una organizaci√≥n boliviana que ense√Īa la agricultura ecol√≥gica a los agricultores. Pocas cosas son m√°s importantes que fomentar alternativas a los plaguicidas y fertilizantes qu√≠micos.

As√≠, Prosuco ense√Īa a los agricultores a hacer dos productos: 1) sulfoc√°lcico: agua hervida con azufre y cal que se usa como fungicida. Algunos agricultores tambi√©n ven que es √ļtil como insecticida. 2) Biofoliar, una soluci√≥n fermentada de esti√©rcol de vaca y cuyes, alfalfa picada, c√°scaras de huevo molidas, ceniza y algunos ingredientes comprados en la tienda: az√ļcar moreno, yogurt y levadura seca activa. Tras unos meses de fermentaci√≥n en un barril, el biofoliar se cuela y puede mezclarse con agua para fumigarlo sobre las hojas de las plantas.

Los agricultores convencionales suelen comprar fertilizantes qu√≠micos, dise√Īados para fumigar sobre un cultivo en crecimiento. Pero este fertilizante qu√≠mico foliar es otra fuente de contaminaci√≥n en nuestros alimentos, porque el producto qu√≠mico se fumiga sobre las hojas de las plantas en crecimiento, como la lechuga y el br√≥coli.

Paul, Marcella y yo estuvimos hace poco con Prosuco haciendo un video en Cebollullo, una comunidad ubicada en un valle estrecho y cálido cerca de La Paz. Estos agricultores ecológicos suelen mezclar biofoliar con sulfocálcio. Están encantados con los resultados. Las plantas crecen muy rápido y sanas, y estos remedios caseros son mucho más baratos que los productos químicos de la tienda.

La mezcla parece funcionar. Una agricultora, do√Īa Ninfa, nos ense√Ī√≥ su br√≥coli. Hab√≠a polillas del repollo (plutella) volando alrededor y pos√°ndose en las hojas. Estas peque√Īas polillas son la mayor plaga del repollo en todo el mundo, y tambi√©n del br√≥coli. Do√Īa Ninfa ha fumigado su br√≥coli con sulfoc√°lcico y biofoliar. Vi muy pocos agujeros en las hojas de la planta, t√≠picos de los da√Īos de la plutella, pero no encontr√© ninguna de sus larvas, peque√Īos gusanos verdes. Sea lo que sea, lo que do√Īa Ninfa hac√≠a, le daba buenos resultados.

Tengo un par de preguntas. Me pregunto si, adem√°s de los nutrientes del biofoliar ¬Ņhay tambi√©n microorganismos buenos que ayuden a las plantas? Para saberlo, tendr√≠amos que analizar los microorganismos del biofoliar, antes y despu√©s de fermentarlo. Entonces necesitar√≠amos saber qu√© microorganismos siguen vivos despu√©s de ser mezclados con el sulfoc√°lcico, que est√° dise√Īada para ser un fungicida, es decir, para matar hongos causantes de enfermedades. La mezcla puede que reduzca microorganismos, pero eso no debe bajar la cantidad de nutrientes favorables para las plantas. Agricultores investigadores de Cebollullo han estado probando relaciones de biofoliar y caldo sulfoc√°lcico para desarrollar un control m√°s eficiente y reducir el n√ļmero de fumigaciones, para ahorrar tiempo y trabajo, ya que sus parcelas son de dif√≠cil acceso, y lejos de las fuentes de agua. ¬†¬†.

Esto no es una crítica a Prosuco, pero es necesario que haya más investigación formal, por ejemplo, de las universidades, sobre los fungicidas y abonos seguros, baratos y naturales que los agricultores puedan hacer en casa y sobre las combinaciones de estos insumos.

Las empresas agroquímicas tienen todas las ventajas. Cooptan la investigación universitaria. También tienen sus propios investigadores. Tienen propaganda en los medios masivos y una gran red de distribución comercial, con vendedores motivados por la meta de ganar dinero.

La agricultura ecológica tiene la buena voluntad de las ONGs, que trabajan con la población local, y con la creatividad de los propios agricultores. Un poco más de apoyo haría la diferencia.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Microbios amigables

Videos relacionados

Buenos microbios para plantas y suelo

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Agradecimiento

Gracias a Roly Cota, Maya Apaza, y Renato Pardo de Prosuco por presentarnos a la comunidad de Cebollullo, y por compartir sus ideas sobre la agricultura orgánica con nosotros. Gracias a María Quispe, Directora de Prosuco, y Paul Van Mele, por leer y hacer valiosos comentarios sobre versiones previas de este relato. Este trabajo fue auspiciado por el Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

 

Naturally affordable March 5th, 2023 by

Certified organic farmers often complain that they need higher prices for their produce, but this means that they will only sell to rich people. The poor won’t have access to this healthy food.

I learned this recently from Mariana Alem, a Bolivian biologist of the AGRECOL Andes Foundation, which is working with smallholder producers to grow and sell affordable organic food in low and middle income areas in the Cochabamba Valley, in Bolivia.

Since 2019, Mariana and her colleague María Omonte, an agronomist, have worked with 36 farmers, mostly women, who were already selling produce in local fairs. The farmers self-declared that their produce was free of agrochemicals. The farmers self-declared that their produce was free of agrochemicals. To build rapport in the group, the women organized themselves to visit each other for a peer review. It started as a kind of inspection, but as the women get to know each other, these visits became a chance to exchange seeds or to share information about topics like recipes for controlling pests without chemicals.

Mariana and María found one group of these farmers at a market called El Playón, in a low-income neighborhood on the edge of the urban sprawl of metropolitan Cochabamba. At this market, buyers and sellers are dressed in work cloths, wearing broad brimmed hats of rural women. They are speaking Quechua, as country people do, rather than Spanish as is spoken in the city.

Since the market only started in 2019 it still has an unfinished look. The stalls are handmade from rough lumber.

Paul and Marcella and I meet do√Īa Gladys, who is selling tomatoes for 8 Bolivianos ($1.15) per kilo, a competitive price. Most of the other women try to sell their locotos (hot peppers) or cucumbers in small piles for 5 Bolivianos each, units that poor people are used to¬† buying.

Others are selling cut flowers and fruit. One of the older women, do√Īa Saturnina, is selling organic peaches, for the same price as conventional ones. Do√Īa Saturnina, who is joined at her stall by her granddaughters, also give us a glass of juice, made from fresh peaches boiled in water, so refreshing.

To offer organic produce at affordable prices, one trick is for farmers to sell directly to consumers. This way, the farmer can charge the retail price. It is easier said than done, because selling is work.

Mariana and María have mentored the women, helping them to make aprons and to identify themselves as self-declared ecological producers. They are not formally certified, but they are producing without agrochemicals.

To sell to retail customers, you have to be at the fair on every market day with a good diversity of products. This group plants many different crops, rather than each person planting the same thing. Then, by sitting near each other the women can attract and share customers. They also increase their range of produce by buying from their neighbor farmers and from wholesalers to sell. Unfortunately, that means that not all of their produce is organic.

With the wisdom of hindsight, Mariana and María insist that the main thing is to be transparent with the consumers when farmers adopt these strategies to supply their stall. . When the women come to sell, each one has a green cloth where they pile up their organic produce. They also have an orange cloth where they are supposed to display any vegetables that they are reselling. The distinction has been a bit too subtle for consumers and a little too hard for the farmer-sellers to manage.

‚ÄúDid you forget your orange cloth today,‚ÄĚ some vendors will chide their neighbors who are selling produce they didn‚Äôt grow, as though it were organic.

These are the kinds of learning experiences that one may have while setting up something new. These growing pains aside, the point is that selling healthy, organic food should be for everyone, not just for people who can afford to pay extra. It is important for farmers to get a fair price, while making organic food affordable. Healthy eating shouldn’t be a luxury.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Mariana Alem and Paul Van Mele for valuable comments on a previous version of this blog. Mariana Alem and María Omonte work for the Fundación Agrecol Andes.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Shopping with Mom

The struggle to sell healthy food

At home with agroforestry

NATURALMENTE ACCESIBLE

Los agricultores ecológicos certificados a veces se quejan de que necesitan precios más altos por sus productos, pero esto significa que sólo venderán a la gente rica. Los pobres no tendrán acceso a estos alimentos sanos.

Esto lo aprend√≠ recientemente de Mariana Alem, una bi√≥loga boliviana de la Fundaci√≥n AGRECOL Andes, que trabaja con peque√Īos productores para cultivar y vender alimentos org√°nicos asequibles en √°reas de bajos ingresos en el Valle de Cochabamba, en Bolivia.

Desde 2019, Mariana y su colega María Omonte, agrónoma, han trabajado con 36 agricultores, en su mayoría mujeres, que se auto declaran producir sin agroquímicos. Para generar confianza entre ellas, han organizado que se visiten unas a otras para una revisión entre pares. Comenzó como una especie de inspección, pero a medida que las mujeres se fueron conociendo, estas visitas se convirtieron en una oportunidad para intercambiar semillas o para compartir información sobre cómo controlar las plagas sin agroquímicos.

Mariana y Mar√≠a encontraron a un grupo de √©stas productoras en un mercado popular que se llama El Play√≥n, al borde de la expansi√≥n urbana de Cochabamba metropolitana. En este mercado, compradores y vendedores usan ropa de trabajo y llevan sombreros de ala ancha de mujer rural. Hablan quechua, como la gente del campo, en lugar de espa√Īol, como se habla en la ciudad.

Como el mercado no empez√≥ hasta 2019, a√ļn tiene un aspecto inacabado. Los puestos est√°n hechos a mano con madera √°spera.

Paul, Marcella y yo nos encontramos con do√Īa Gladys, que vende tomates a 8 bolivianos (1,15 d√≥lares) el kilo, un precio competitivo. La mayor√≠a de las dem√°s mujeres intentan vender sus locotos (chiles) o pepinos en peque√Īos montones por 5 bolivianos cada uno, unidades que la gente pobre est√° acostumbrada a comprar.

Otras venden flores cortadas y fruta. Una de las mujeres mayores, do√Īa Saturnina, vende duraznos ecol√≥gicos al mismo precio que los convencionales. Do√Īa Saturnina, a quien acompa√Īan en su puesto sus nietas, tambi√©n nos da un vaso de jugo, hecho con duraznos frescos hervidos en agua, tan refrescante.

Para ofrecer productos ecol√≥gicos a precios asequibles, un truco es que los agricultores vendan directamente a los consumidores. De este modo, el agricultor puede cobrar el precio de venta al p√ļblico. Es m√°s f√°cil decirlo que hacerlo, porque vender es un trabajo.

Mariana y María han asesorado a las mujeres, ayudándolas a confeccionar mandiles y a identificarse como productoras ecológicas auto-declaradas. No están certificadas formalmente, pero producen sin agroquímicos.

Para vender directo al consumidor, hay que estar en el mercado todos los días de feria con una buena diversidad de productos. Este grupo siembra muchos cultivos diferentes, en lugar de que cada persona plante lo mismo. Así, al sentarse cerca unas de otras, las mujeres pueden atraer y compartir clientes. También aumentan su gama de productos comprando a sus vecinas agricultoras y a mayoristas para revender. Por desgracia, eso significa que no todos sus productos son ecológicos.

En retrospectiva, Mariana y María insisten en que la transparencia al consumidor es lo más importante cuando las productoras realizan este tipo de estrategias para surtir sus puestos. Cuando las mujeres vienen a vender, cada una tiene una manta verde donde amontonan sus productos ecológicos. También tienen una manta anaranjada donde se supone que exponen las verduras que revenden. La distinción ha sido un poco sutil para los consumidores y un poco difícil de manejar para las agricultoras-vendedoras.

“¬ŅSe te ha olvidado hoy la manta anaranjada?, rega√Īan algunas vendedoras a sus vecinas que venden productos que no han cultivado, como si fueran ecol√≥gicos.

Así se aprende sobre la marcha cuando uno pone en práctica algo nuevo. Dejando a un lado estos problemas, la cuestión es que la venta de alimentos sanos y ecológicos debería ser para todos, no sólo para quienes pueden permitirse pagar más. Es importante que los agricultores obtengan un precio justo y que los alimentos ecológicos sean accesibles. Comer sano no debería ser un lujo.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Mariana Alem y a Paul Van Mele por sus valiosos comentarios sobre una versión previa de este blog. Mariana Alem y María Omonte trabajan para la Fundación AGRECOL Andes.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

De compras con mam√°

The struggle to sell healthy food

En casa con la agroforestería

 

 

Shopping with mom February 12th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Shopping can not only be fun, but healthy and educational, as Paul and Marcella and I learned recently while filming a video in Cochabamba, Bolivia.

We visited a stall run by Laura Guzmán, who we have met in a previous blog story. Laura’s stall is so busy that her brother and a cousin help out. They sell the family’s own produce, some from the neighbors, and some they buy wholesale.

The market is clean and open to the light and air. All of the stalls neatly display their vegetables, grains and flowers. While Marcella films, Paul and I stand to one side, keeping out of the shot. Paul is quick to observe that Laura holds up each package of vegetables, explaining them to her customers. One pair of women listen attentively, and then buy several packages before moving on to another stall.

Paul reminds me that we need to interview consumers for this video on selling organic produce, so we approach the two shoppers. As in Ecuador, when we filmed consumers in the market, I was pleasantly surprised how strangers can be quite happy to appear on an educational video.

One of the women, Sonia Pinedo, spoke with confidence into the camera, explaining how she always looks for organic produce. ‚ÄúOrganic vegetables are important, because they are not contaminated and they are good for your health.‚ÄĚ

‚ÄúAnd now you can interview my daughter,‚ÄĚ Sonia said, nudging the young woman next to her.

Her daughter, 21-year-old university student, Lorena Quispe, spoke about how important it was to engage young consumers, teaching them to demand chemical-free food. She pointed out that if youth start eating right when they are young, they will not only live longer, but when they reach 60, they will still be healthy, and able to enjoy life. Remarkably, Lorena also pointed out that consumers play a role supporting organic farmers. She had clearly understood that choosing good food also builds communities.

Food shopping is often a way for parents to spend time with their children, and to pass on knowledge about food and healthy living, so that the kids grow up to be thoughtful young adults.

Watch a related video

Creating agroecological markets

DE COMPRAS CON MAM√Ā

Jeff Bentley, 5 de febrero del 2023

Ir de compras no sólo puede ser divertido, sino también saludable y educativo, como Paul, Marcella y yo aprendimos hace poco mientras grabábamos un video en Cochabamba, Bolivia.

Visitamos un puesto de ventas de Laura Guzm√°n, a quien ya conocimos en una historia anterior del blog. El puesto de Laura est√° tan concurrido que su hermano y un primo la ayudan. Venden los productos de la familia, algunos de los vecinos y otros que compran al por mayor.

El mercado est√° limpio y abierto a la luz y al aire. Todos los puestos exponen con esmero sus verduras, cereales y flores. Mientras Marcella filma, Paul y yo nos quedamos a un lado, fuera del plano. Paul no tarda en observar que Laura sostiene en alto cada paquete de verduras, explic√°ndoselas a sus clientes. Un par de mujeres escuchan atentamente y compran varios paquetes antes de pasar a otro puesto.

Paul me recuerda que tenemos que entrevistar a los consumidores para este video sobre la venta de productos ecológicos, así que nos acercamos a las dos compradoras. Al igual que en Ecuador, cuando filmamos a los consumidores en el mercado, me sorprendió gratamente que a pesar de que no nos conocen, están dispuestos a salir en un video educativo.

Una de las mujeres, Sonia Pinedo, habla con confianza a la c√°mara y explica que siempre busca productos ecol√≥gicos. “Las verduras ecol√≥gicas son importantes, porque no est√°n contaminadas y son buenas para la salud”.

“Y ahora puedes entrevistar a mi hija”, dijo Sonia, dando un codazo a la joven que estaba a su lado.

Su hija, Lorena Quispe, una estudiante universitaria de 21 a√Īos, habl√≥ de la importancia de involucrar a los j√≥venes consumidores, ense√Ī√°ndoles a exigir alimentos libres de productos qu√≠micos. Se√Īal√≥ que, si los j√≥venes empiezan a comer bien de peque√Īos, no s√≥lo vivir√°n m√°s, sino que cuando lleguen a los 60 seguir√°n estando sanos y podr√°n disfrutar de la vida. Sorprendentemente, Lorena tambi√©n se√Īal√≥ que los consumidores juegan un papel de apoyo a los agricultores ecol√≥gicos. Hab√≠a comprendido claramente que elegir buenos alimentos tambi√©n construye comunidades.

La compra de alimentos suele ser una forma de que los padres pasen tiempo con sus hijos y les transmitan conocimientos sobre alimentaci√≥n y vida sana, para que los ni√Īos se conviertan en j√≥venes adultos pensativos.

Vea un video relacionado

Creando ferias agroecológicas

The struggle to sell healthy food January 22nd, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Consumers are increasingly realizing the need to eat healthy food, produced without agrochemicals, but on our recent trip to Bolivia we were reminded once more that many organic farmers struggle to sell their produce at a fair price.

The last few days Jeff, Marcella and I have been filming with a group of agroecological farmers in Cochabamba, a city with 1.4 million inhabitants at an altitude of about 2,400 meters. Traditionally, local demand for flowers was high, to use as gifts and decorations at the many festivities, weddings, funerals and family celebrations. When we interview do√Īa Nelly in front of the camera, she explains how many of the women of her agroecological group were into the commercial cut flower business until 5 years ago: ‚ÄúThe main reason we abandoned the flower business was that various people in our neighbourhood became seriously sick from the heavy use of pesticides.‚ÄĚ

As the women began to produce vegetables instead of flowers, they also took training on ecological farming. They realized that the only way to remain in good health is to care for the health of their soil and the food they consume. All of them being born farmers, the step to start growing organic food seemed a logical one. With the support of a Agrecol Andes, a local NGO that supports agroecological food systems, a group of 16 women embarked on a new journey, full of new challenges.

‚ÄúOver these past years, we have seen our soil improve again, earthworms and other soil creatures have come back. But I think it will take 10 years before the soil will have fully recovered from the intense misuse of flower growing,‚ÄĚ says Nelly.

On Friday morning, we visit the house of one of the members of the group. Various women arrive, carrying their produce in woven bags on their back. Their fresh produce was harvested the day before, washed, weighed, packed and labelled with their group certificate. Internationally recognized organic certification is costly and most farmers in developing countries cannot afford it. So, they use an alternative, more local certification scheme, called Participatory Guarantee System or PGS, whereby member producers evaluate each other. More recently, the group also gets certification from the national government, SENASAG.

Agrecol staff supports the women as they prepare food baskets for their growing number of customers that want their food delivered either at their home or office. Some customers also come and collect their weekly basket at the Agrecol office. Jeff’s wife, Ana, shows us one evening how every week she receives a list of about 4 pages with all produce available that week, and the prices. Until Wednesday noon, the 150 clients are free to select if and what they want to buy. The demand is processed, farmers harvest on Thursday and the fresh food is delivered on Friday morning: a really short food chain with food that has only been harvested the day before it was delivered.

Organizing personalised food baskets weekly is time-consuming. Most farmers also need institutional support as they lack a social network of potential clients in urban centres. Agrecol has invested a lot in sensitising consumers about the need to consume healthy food, using leaflets, social media, fairs and farm visits for consumers. Without support from Agrecol or someone who takes it up as a full-time business, it is difficult for farmers to sell their high-quality produce.

In her interview, Nelly explains that the home delivery was a recent innovation they introduced when the Covid crisis hit, as local markets had closed down, yet people still needed food. Now that public markets re-opened, demand strongly fluctuates from one week to the next, and with the tight profit margins, it might be a challenge to turn it into profitable business. NGOs like Agrecol play a crucial role in helping farmers produce healthy food, and raising the awareness of consumers, who learn to appreciate organic produce.

As Cochabamba is a large city, Agrecol has over the years helped agroecological farmer groups to negotiate with the local authorities to ensure they have a dedicated space on the weekly markets in various parts of the city.

Local authorities have a crucial role to play in supporting ecological and organic farmers that goes way beyond providing training and inspecting fields. Farmers need a fair price and a steady market to sell their produce. Being given a space at conventional, urban markets and dedicated agroecological markets is helping, but in low-income countries very few consumers are willing to pay a little extra for food that is produced free of chemicals. Public procurements by local authorities to provide schools with healthy food may provide a more stable source of revenue. It is no surprise that global movements such as the Global Alliance of Organic Districts (GAOD) have put this as a central theme.

Agroecological farmers who go the extra mile to nurture the health of our planet and the people who live on it, deserve a stable, fair income and peace of mind.

As Nelly concluded in her interview: “It is a struggle, but we have to fight it for the good of our children and those who come after them.”

Related blogs

Better food for better farming

Marketing as a performance

Choosing to farm

An exit strategy

Exit strategy 2.0

Look me in the eyes

Related training videos

Creating agroecological markets

Home delivery of organic produce

 

De strijd om gezond voedsel te verkopen

Consumenten worden zich steeds meer bewust van de noodzaak om gezond voedsel te eten, geproduceerd zonder landbouwchemicali√ęn, maar tijdens onze recente reis naar Bolivia werden we er opnieuw aan herinnerd dat veel biologische boeren moeite hebben om hun producten tegen een eerlijke prijs te verkopen.

De afgelopen dagen hebben Jeff, Marcella en ik gefilmd met een groep agro-ecologische boeren in Cochabamba, een stad met 1,4 miljoen inwoners op een hoogte van ongeveer 2.400 meter. Traditioneel was de lokale vraag naar bloemen groot, om te gebruiken als geschenk en decoratie bij de vele festiviteiten, bruiloften, begrafenissen en familiefeesten. Als we do√Īa Nelly voor de camera interviewen, legt ze uit hoe veel van de vrouwen van haar agro-ecologische groep tot 5 jaar geleden in de commerci√ęle snijbloemenhandel zaten: “De belangrijkste reden dat we de bloemenhandel hebben opgegeven was dat verschillende mensen in onze buurt ernstig ziek werden door het zware gebruik van pesticiden.”

Toen de vrouwen groenten begonnen te produceren in plaats van bloemen, volgden ze ook een opleiding ecologisch tuinieren. Ze beseften dat de enige manier om gezond te blijven, is te zorgen voor de gezondheid van hun grond en het voedsel dat ze consumeren. Omdat ze allemaal geboren boeren zijn, leek de stap om biologisch voedsel te gaan verbouwen een logische. Met de steun van Agrecol Andes, een lokale NGO die agro-ecologische voedselsystemen ondersteunt, begon een groep van 16 vrouwen aan een nieuwe reis, vol nieuwe uitdagingen.

“De afgelopen jaren hebben we onze grond weer zien verbeteren, regenwormen en andere bodemorganismen zijn teruggekomen. Maar ik denk dat het 10 jaar zal duren voordat de grond volledig hersteld is van het intensieve misbruik van de bloementeelt,” zegt Nelly.

Op vrijdagochtend bezoeken we het huis van een van de leden van de groep. Verschillende vrouwen arriveren, met hun producten in geweven zakken op hun rug. Hun verse producten zijn de dag ervoor geoogst, gewassen, gewogen, verpakt en voorzien van hun groepscertificaat. Internationaal erkende biologische certificering is duur en de meeste boeren in ontwikkelingslanden kunnen zich dat niet veroorloven. Daarom gebruiken ze een alternatief, meer lokaal certificeringssysteem, het zogenaamde Participatory Guarantee System of PGS, waarbij de aangesloten producenten elkaar controleren. Sinds kort wordt de groep ook gecertificeerd door de nationale overheid, SENASAG.

De medewerkers van Agrecol ondersteunen de vrouwen bij het samenstellen van de voedselpakketten voor hun groeiende aantal klanten die hun voedsel thuis of op kantoor geleverd willen krijgen. Sommige klanten komen ook hun wekelijkse mand ophalen in het kantoor van Agrecol. Jeff’s vrouw, Ana, laat ons op een avond zien hoe zij elke week een lijst van ongeveer 4 pagina’s ontvangt met alle producten die die week beschikbaar zijn, en de prijzen. Tot woensdagmiddag zijn de 150 klanten vrij om te kiezen of en wat ze willen kopen. De vraag wordt verwerkt, de boeren oogsten op donderdag en het verse voedsel wordt op vrijdagochtend geleverd: een echt korte voedselketen met voedsel dat pas de dag voor de levering is geoogst.

Het wekelijks organiseren van gepersonaliseerde voedselmanden is tijdrovend. De meeste boeren hebben ook institutionele steun nodig omdat ze geen sociaal netwerk van potenti√ęle klanten in stedelijke centra hebben. Agrecol heeft veel ge√Įnvesteerd in het sensibiliseren van consumenten over de noodzaak van gezonde voeding, met behulp van folders, sociale media, beurzen en boerderijbezoeken voor consumenten. Zonder steun van Agrecol of iemand die er fulltime mee bezig is, is het voor boeren moeilijk om hun kwaliteitsproducten te verkopen.

In haar interview legt Nelly uit dat de thuisbezorging een recente innovatie was die ze introduceerde toen de Covid-crisis toesloeg, omdat de lokale markten gesloten waren, maar de mensen toch voedsel nodig hadden. Nu de openbare markten weer geopend zijn, schommelt de vraag sterk van week tot week, en met de krappe winstmarges kan het een uitdaging zijn om er een winstgevend bedrijf van te maken. NGO’s als Agrecol spelen een cruciale rol door de boeren te helpen gezond voedsel te produceren, en door de consumenten bewuster te maken van biologische producten.

Omdat Cochabamba een grote stad is, heeft Agrecol in de loop der jaren groepen agro-ecologische boeren geholpen bij de onderhandelingen met de lokale autoriteiten om ervoor te zorgen dat zij een speciale plaats krijgen op de wekelijkse markten in verschillende delen van de stad.

Lokale autoriteiten spelen een cruciale rol bij de ondersteuning van ecologische en biologische boeren, die veel verder gaat dan het geven van trainingen en het inspecteren van velden. Boeren hebben een eerlijke prijs en een vaste markt nodig om hun producten te verkopen. Een plaats krijgen op conventionele, stedelijke markten en speciale agro-ecologische markten helpt, maar in lage-inkomenslanden zijn maar weinig consumenten bereid een beetje extra te betalen voor voedsel dat zonder chemicali√ęn is geproduceerd. Openbare aanbestedingen door lokale overheden om scholen te voorzien van gezond voedsel kunnen een stabielere bron van inkomsten opleveren. Het is geen verrassing dat wereldwijde bewegingen zoals de Global Alliance for Organic Districts (GAOD) dit als een centraal thema stellen.

Agro-ecologische boeren die een stapje extra zetten om de gezondheid van onze planeet en de mensen die erop leven te voeden, verdienen een stabiel, eerlijk inkomen en gemoedsrust.

Zoals Nelly zei in haar interview: “het is een strijd, maar we moeten deze voeren voor het welzijn van onze kinderen en zij die na hen komen.”

No more pink seed January 8th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Vegetable seed from the shop is usually covered in a pink or orange dust, a fungicide. Since I was a kid, I have associated the color pink with seed.

Farmers and gardeners in tropical countries often buy imported, pink seed. So when Bolivian seed companies appeared, I was glad to be able to buy envelopes of local garden seed. It was better than importing seed from the USA or Europe.  I barely noticed that the Bolivian seed was pink. Then on a visit to some agroecological farmers, they told me that they were buying the pink seed, but then rearing it out, to produce their own, natural seed.

Recently I have begun to notice artisanal seed growers, offering untreated vegetable seed at some of the fairs around Cochabamba, Bolivia. I was tempted to buy some, but I still had seed at home.

A few days ago I opened some of my seed envelopes, which I bought several months ago. The package says they are viable for two years. I was pleased to see that the envelopes were full of natural seed, untainted by fungicides. I planted cucumbers, lettuce and arugula, and the natural seed has all sprouted nicely.

I was so pleased that I decided to call the seed manufacturers and congratulate them. Some positive feedback might encourage them to keep selling natural, uncoated seed.

I picked up a seed packet to look for the company‚Äôs phone number, when I noticed that it said ‚ÄúWarning!‚ÄĚ in big red letters, and in fine print: ‚ÄúProduct treated with Thiram, not to be used as feed for poultry or other animals.‚ÄĚ

Thiram is a fungicide. I wondered if the seed had been treated with fungicide, but not dyed, or if the company was avoiding pesticides, but was still using up its supply of old envelopes.

I called the company, and a friendly voice answered the phone. I introduced myself as a customer, and said that I liked the pesticide-free seed. Then I asked if this lot of seed had fungicide or not.

The seed man said that no, the seed had not been treated with fungicide, but that it should have been. That is a requirement of the government agencies Senasag (National Service for Agricultural and Livestock Health and Food Safety) and INIAF (National Institute of Agricultural, Livestock and Forestry Innovation).

I asked why this seed was untreated.

‚ÄúThe girl must have forgotten to put it on,‚ÄĚ the seed man said. This may strike readers in northern countries as casual sloppiness. But sometimes regulations are lightly enforced in Bolivia. My cucumber seeds were packed in May, 2021, during the height of the Covid lockdown. I was impressed that they were able to keep producing seeds at all.

The seed man didn’t seem to mind that the seed was untreated, and he repeated that he applied the pink stuff because it was required by law. He didn’t seem convinced that it was necessary. He seemed sympathetic to people who preferred natural seed. He added that he did sell untreated seed to customers who wanted it. He had some customers who ate sprouted lettuce seed for their gastritis, and he made them special batches of untreated seed.

Before we got off the call, the seed man offered to make me a batch of untreated seed in the future. I just had to order it.

I think I will.

It is important that seed consumers look for untreated seed. But governments also need to do more to help make it available.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

An exit strategy

Homegrown seed can be good

Some videos on seed

Farmers’ rights to seed: experiences from Guatemala

Farmers’ rights to seed: experiences from Malawi

Succeed with seeds

Managing seed potato

Organic coating of cereal seed

Making a good okra seeding

Better seed for green gram

Making a chilli seedbed

Maintaining varietal purity of sesame

Harvesting and storing soya bean seed

Storing cowpea seed

ADIOS A LA SEMILLA ROSADA

Jeff Bentley, 8 de enero del 2023

Las semillas de hortalizas de la tienda suelen estar cubiertas de un polvillo rosado o color naranja, un fungicida. Desde que era ni√Īo, he asociado el color rosado con las semillas.

Los agricultores y jardineros de los países tropicales suelen comprar semillas rosadas importadas. Por eso, cuando aparecieron las empresas bolivianas de semillas, me alegré de poder comprar sobres de semillas locales para el huerto. Era mejor que importar semillas de los Estados Unidos o Europa.  Apenas me di cuenta de que las semillas bolivianas eran rosadas. Luego, en una visita a unos agricultores agroecológicos, me contaron que compraban la semilla rosada, pero que luego la criaban para producir su propia semilla natural.

Recientemente he empezado a fijarme en los cultivadores artesanales de semillas, que ofrecen semillas de hortalizas sin qu√≠micos en algunas de las ferias de los alrededores de Cochabamba, Bolivia. Ten√≠a ganas de comprar algunas, pero a√ļn ten√≠a semillas en casa.

Hace unos d√≠as abr√≠ algunos de mis sobres de semillas, que compr√© hace varios meses. Seg√ļn el paquete, son viables durante dos a√Īos. Me alegr√≥ ver que los sobres estaban llenos de semillas naturales, no contaminadas por fungicidas. Sembr√© pepinos, lechugas y r√ļcula, y todas las semillas naturales han brotado muy bien.

Estaba tan contenta que decidí llamar a los fabricantes de semillas y felicitarles. Una respuesta positiva podría animarles a seguir vendiendo semillas naturales sin recubrimiento.

Cog√≠ un paquete de semillas para buscar el n√ļmero de tel√©fono de la empresa, cuando me di cuenta de que dec√≠a “¬°Precauci√≥n!” en grandes letras rojas, y en letra peque√Īa: “Producto tratado con Thiram, no utilizar como alimento para aves u otro animal”.

Thiram es un fungicida. Me pregunt√© si la semilla hab√≠a sido tratada con fungicida, pero no te√Īida, o si la empresa estaba evitando los plaguicidas, pero segu√≠a usando sus sobres viejos.

Llamé a la empresa y una voz amable contestó al teléfono. Me presenté como cliente y dije que me gustaban las semillas sin plaguicidas. Luego pregunté si este lote de semillas tenía fungicida o no.

El encargado me dijo que no, que la semilla no había sido tratada con fungicida, pero que debería haberlo sido. Es una exigencia de las agencias gubernamentales SENASAG (Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria e Inocuidad Alimentaria) e INIAF (Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agropecuaria y Forestal).

Pregunté por qué esta semilla no estaba tratada.

“Se habr√° olvidado la muchacha”, me dijo el semilleristya. A los lectores de los pa√≠ses del norte les puede parecer un descuido. Pero, a veces, en Bolivia los reglamentos se aplican con cierta flexibilidad. Mis semillas de pepino se empaquetaron en mayo de 2021, en plena cuarentena de Covid. Me impresion√≥ que pudieran seguir produciendo semillas.

Al semillero no pareci√≥ importarle que las semillas no estuvieran tratadas, y repiti√≥ que aplic√≥ el producto rosado porque se lo exig√≠a la ley. No parec√≠a convencido de que fuera necesario. Se solidarizaba con los que prefieren las semillas naturales. A√Īadi√≥ que vende semillas sin tratar a los clientes que la desean. Ten√≠a algunos clientes que com√≠an semillas pregerminadas de lechuga para la gastritis y les preparaba lotes especiales de semillas sin tratar.

Antes de terminar la llamada, el semillero se ofreció a hacerme un lote de semillas sin tratar en el futuro. Sólo tenía que pedirlo.

Creo que lo haré.

Es importante que los consumidores busquen semillas no tratadas. Pero los gobiernos también tienen que hacer más para ayudar a que estén disponibles.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Una estrategia de salida

Homegrown seed can be good

Algunos videos sobre la semilla

Derechos de los agricultores a la semilla: Guatemala

Derechos de los agricultores a la semilla: Malawi

Succeed with seeds

Cuidando la semilla de papa

Organic coating of cereal seed

Buena semilla de ocra

Better seed for green gram

Making a chilli seedbed

Maintaining varietal purity of sesame

Harvesting and storing soya bean seed

Storing cowpea seed

Design by Olean webdesign