WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Planting water May 5th, 2024 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

If a drier world needs more water, we may have to plant it ourselves. So, last week I took a course on how to do that. It was taught by my friends at Agroecología y Fe, a Bolivian NGO, which is doing applied, practical research on ways to plant and harvest water.

As we learned on the course, if the land is gently sloping, 0 to 6%, and if the bedrock is made of soft stone, rainwater can soak into it. The mountain slopes above the valleys of Cochabamba are made of soft, sedimentary rock, especially sandstone and shale. Many of the aquifers are short, just a few kilometers. Water that permeates the bedrock may emerge as a spring not far downhill. And the slower the water runs off the land, the more moisture sinks in.

The NGO’s name means “Agroecology and Faith.” And it must have taken a leap of faith eight years ago when they began to convince the people of the village of Chacapaya, Sipe, about an hour and a half from the city of Cochabamba, that there was a way to “plant water,” for their homes and gardens.

Marcelina Alarcón and Freddy Vargas, who are both agronomists with Agroecology and Faith, had worked with the community for years, on agroecological gardening projects. Still, it took a year to convince the people that there was a way to bring in more water. It was only after the local people saw that their springs and streams were starting to dry up, that they eventually agreed to try planting water.

They started by observing their land, hiking uphill from the springs. The oldest people, who knew the land well, showed Marcelina and Freddy were the water soaked in, or at least, where it used to soak in, before most of the vegetation had been removed by grazing animals and by cutting firewood.

They identified a plateau above the village, with five long, gently sloping depressions. In one of these places, called San Francisco, they dug shallow trenches with small machinery to slow the water. The community members also met to sign a document promising that in San Francisco they would not:

  1. Graze livestock
  2. Cut firewood
  3. Burn vegetation, or
  4. Plow up land for farming

As I learned from Germán Vargas, Freddy’s brother and the coordinator of Agroecology and Faith, those four commitments are the key to planting water. It sounds like a lot to ask, but Bolivians are now cooking with natural gas, even in the countryside, so firewood is less important. Children are going to school and don’t have time to herd sheep and goats. Many families have moved to the city, or commute there to work. They may still come home to plant crops, but are less interested in plowing up remote land for new fields. All of this means that there is less pressure on marginal lands, and an opportunity to use them to generate water.

When the course participants visited San Francisco, most of the water infiltration trenches were still holding water, even though it had not rained for weeks. It was hard to believe that just seven years earlier, this land had been bare, hardpacked soil. Now it was covered with native plants. Small trees were growing, not just the qhewiñas that the people had planted recently, but other species that were sprouting on their own, like khishwara, as well as brush, and grasses, including needle grass. Reforestation has worked so well that in January of 2024, the community dedicated another of their highland pastures to planting water.

Below San Francisco, there is a steep rocky slope, and at the base of that, a small spring that collects water from the plateau. When we saw the spring, it was gushing with clear water. Freddy explained that in 2017 this spring produced 2.3 liters of water per second. Every year it varied, with the rainfall, but the spring tended to hold more water every year. In 2024 it was running at about 5 liters per second, twice as much water in seven years.

The water from the spring feeds a stream that passes through Chacapaya, and the community has built tanks and tubes to distribute the water for drinking, irrigation and for livestock. Fortunately, the water benefits two communities. Below Chacapaya, the water flows into the River Pancuruma, which is dry most of the year. However, there is water just below the surface, where the residents of Chawarani, a neighborhood of the small city of Sipe Sipe, had dug a shallow well into the riverbed. Thanks in part to the water running off of San Francisco, the well is full of clear, clean water.

In 2023, donors helped pay for a large water tank (about 830,000 liters) in Chawarani, now filled by a solar pump, serving the community. The local people provided the labor and local materials for the project.

In these times when everything seems to be going wrong, I was glad to see that water can be managed creatively. This is a first experience, and yes, it has outside funding, but it’s proof of concept. Communities in other semi-arid parts of the world with degraded pasture on sloping land have an opportunity to use damaged lands to plant and harvest water. This is important in a warmer, drier world.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Ing. Germán Vargas, Ing. Marcelina Alarcón, and Ing. Freddy Vargas, who all work at Agroecología y Fe, for offering an excellent course, and for the inspiring work they do. This work is supported by Misereor, Trees for All, Wilde Ganzen Foundation, Helvetas, and Fundación Samay. Thanks also to Germán Vargas, Paul Van Mele, and Clara Bentley for reading and commenting on a previous version of this story.

Photos

The top photo is courtesy of Germán Vargas. The others are by Jeff Bentley.

Scientific names

Qhewiña is Polylepis spp. Khishwara is Buddleja spp. Needle grass is Stipa ichu.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Farming with trees

What counts in agroecology

Concrete negotiations

Gardening against all odds

Slow recovery

At home with agroforestry

Related videos

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Managed regeneration

Seeing the life in the soil

Road runoff harvesting

SEMBRAR AGUA

Por Jeff Bentley, 5 de mayo del 2024

Si un mundo más seco necesita más agua, quizá tengamos que sembrarla. La semana pasada asistí a un curso sobre cómo hacerlo. Lo impartieron mis amigos de Agroecología y Fe, una ONG boliviana que hace investigación aplicada y práctica sobre cómo sembrar, criar y cosechar agua.

Como aprendimos en el curso, si el terreno tiene una pendiente suave, del 0 al 6%, y si la piedra madre es blanda, el agua de lluvia puede infiltrarse. Las faldas de la cordillera alrededor de los valles de Cochabamba son de roca sedimentaria blanda, sobre todo arenisca y lutita. Muchos de los acuíferos son cortos, de unos pocos kilómetros. El agua que penetra la roca puede brotar en un manantial no muy lejos, cuesta abajo. Y si el agua corre más lento sobre la tierra, se infiltra más.

Los de la ONG Agroecología y Fe realmente mostraron algo de fe hace ocho años, cuando empezaron a convencer a los comuneros de Chacapaya, Sipe, a una hora y media de la ciudad de Cochabamba, de que había una forma de sembrar agua, para sus hogares y sus huertos.

Marcelina Alarcón y Freddy Vargas, ambos agrónomos de Agroecología y Fe, llevaban años trabajando con la comunidad en proyectos de huertos agroecológicos. Aun así, les costó un año convencer a la gente de que había una forma de traer más agua. Sólo después de que la gente viera que sus vertientes y ríos empezaban a secarse, quedaron en intentar sembrar y criar agua.

Empezaron por observar sus tierras, desplazándose cuesta arriba desde las vertientes. Los más ancianos, que conocían bien la tierra, mostraron a Marcelina y Freddy dónde se infiltraba el agua, o al menos, dónde solía infiltrarse, antes de que casi toda la vegetación había sido eliminada por el pastoreo y por la tala de leña.

Identificaron una meseta por encima de la comunidad, con cinco depresiones alargadas y suavemente inclinadas. En uno de estos lugares, llamado San Francisco, cavaron zanjas poco profundas con pequeña maquinaria para frenar el agua. Los miembros de la comunidad también se reunieron para firmar un documento en el que prometían que en San Francisco no harían lo siguiente:

  1. Pastorear animales
  2. Cortar leña
  3. Quemar vegetación, o
  4. Habilitar terreno para cultivos

Según aprendí de Germán Vargas, hermano de Freddy y coordinador de Agroecología y Fe, esos cuatro compromisos son la clave para sembrar agua. Parece mucho pedir, pero ahora los bolivianos cocinan con gas natural, incluso en el campo, así que la leña es menos importante. Los niños van a la escuela y no tienen tiempo para pastorear ovejas y cabras. Muchas familias se han trasladado a la ciudad o van allí para trabajar. A veces vuelven a sus lugares de origen para sembrar, pero están menos interesados en preparar tierras remotas para crear nuevas chacras. Todo esto significa que hay menos presión sobre las tierras marginales, lo cual es una oportunidad de usarlas para generar agua.

Cuando los participantes del curso visitaron San Francisco, la mayoría de las zanjas de infiltración todavía tenían agua, a pesar de que hacía semanas que no llovía. Era difícil creer que sólo siete años antes, esta tierra había sido un suelo desnudo y duro. Ahora estaba cubierto de plantas nativas. Crecían pequeños árboles, no sólo las qhewiñas que la gente había plantado recientemente, sino otras especies que habían nacido por sí solas, como el khishwara, y las t’olas (arbustos nativos), pastos, y la paja brava, La reforestación ha funcionado tan bien que, en enero de 2024, la comunidad dedicó otro de sus pastizales de altura a la siembra de agua.

Debajo de San Francisco hay una inclinación rocosa y, en su base, una pequeña vertiente que se alimenta con el agua de la meseta. Cuando vimos la vertiente, manaba un chorro de agua cristalina. Freddy nos explicó que en 2017 esta vertiente daba 2,3 litros de agua por segundo. Cada año variaba, con las lluvias, pero la vertiente tendía a tener más agua cada año. En 2024 llevaba unos 5 litros por segundo, el doble de agua hace siete años.

El agua de esta vertiente pasa por Chacapaya, donde la comunidad ha construido reservorios y un sistema de distribución en tubería para agua potable, riego y para animales domésticos. Felizmente, el agua beneficia a dos comunidades. Más abajo de Chacapaya, el agua desemboca en el Río Pancuruma, que está seco la mayor parte del año. Sin embargo, hay agua justo debajo de la superficie, donde los vecinos de Chawarani, un vecindario de la pequeña ciudad de Sipe, había excavado un pozo poco profundo, una galería filtrante, en el lecho del río. Gracias en parte al agua que fluye desde San Francisco, el pozo está lleno de agua cristalina y limpia.

En 2023, los donantes ayudaron a costear un gran depósito de agua (unos 830.000 litros) en Chawarani, que ahora se llena con una bomba solar y sirve a la comunidad. La población local aportó la mano de obra y los materiales locales para el proyecto.

En estos tiempos en que todo parece estar mal, me alegró ver que el agua puede manejarse de forma creativa. Se trata de una primera experiencia, y sí, tiene financiamiento externo, pero es una prueba de concepto. Los pueblos de otras zonas semiáridas del mundo con pastizales degradados en altura tienen la oportunidad de usar los terrenos dañados para sembrar y cosechar agua. Esto es importante en un mundo más caliente y más seco.

Agradecimientos

Gracias al Ing. Germán Vargas, Ing. Marcelina Alarcón, y al Ing. Freddy Vargas, quienes trabajan en Agroecología y Fe, por ofrecer un excelente curso, y por el inspirador trabajo que realizan. Este trabajo es apoyado por Misereor, Trees for All, Fundación Wilde Ganzen, Helvetas, y Fundación Samay. Gracias también a Germán Vargas, Paul Van Mele y Clara Bentley por leer y comentar una versión anterior de este artículo.

Fotos

La primera foto es cortesía de Germán Vargas. Las demás son de Jeff Bentley.

Nombres científicos

Qhewiña es Polylepis spp. Khishwara es Buddleja spp. Paja brava es Stipa ichu.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

La agricultura con árboles

Lo que cuenta en la agroecología

Negociaciones concretas

Un mejor futuro con jardines

Recuperación lenta

En casa con la agroforestería

Videos relevantes

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Regeneración manejada

Ver la vida en el suelo

Cosechando agua del camino

 

 

Giving hope to child mothers October 29th, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Teenage girls are vulnerable and when they become pregnant societies deal with them in different ways. In Uganda, they are called all sorts of names, such as a bad person, a disgrace to parents, and even a prostitute. No one wants their children to associate with them because they are considered a bad influence. Parents often expel their daughters from the family and tell them that their life has come to end. Rebecca Akullu experienced this at the age of 17. But Rebecca is not like any other girl.

After giving birth to her baby, she saved money to go to college, where she got a diploma in business studies in 2018. Rebecca soon got a job as accountant at the Aryodi Bee Farm in Lira, northern Uganda, a region that has high youth unemployment and is still recovering from the violence unleashed by the Lord’s Resistance Army, a rebel group. The farm director appreciated her work so much that he employed her.

“Over the years, I developed a real passion for bees,” Rebecca says, “and through hands-on training, I became an expert in beekeeping myself. Whenever l had a chance to visit farmers, I was shocked to see how they destroyed and polluted the environment with agrochemicals, so I became deeply convinced of the need to care for our environment.”

So, when Access Agriculture launched a call for young entrepreneurs to become farm advisors using a solar-powered projector to screen farmer training videos, Rebecca applied. After being selected as an Entrepreneur for Rural Access (ERA) in 2021, she received the equipment and training. At first she combined her ERA services with her job at the farm, but by the end of the year she resigned. Promoting her new business service required courage. Asked about her first marketing effort, Rebecca said she informed her community at church, at the end of Sunday service.

“I was really anxious the first time I had to screen videos to a group of 30 farmers. I wondered if the equipment would work, which video topics the farmers would ask for and whether I would be able to answer their questions afterwards,” Rebecca recalls. Her anxiety soon evaporated. Farmers wanted to know what videos she had on maize, so she showed several, including the ones on the fall armyworm, a pest that destroys entire fields. Farmers learned how to monitor their maize to detect the pest early, and they started to control it with wood ash instead of toxic pesticides.

Rebecca was asked to organise bi-weekly shows for several months, and she continues to do this, whenever asked. Having negotiated with the farm leader, each farmer pays 1,000 Ugandan Shillings (0.25 Euro) per show, where they watch and discuss three to five videos in the local Luo language. Some of the videos are available in English only, so Rebecca translates them for the farmers. “But collecting money from individual farmers and mobilising them for each show is not easy,” she says.

The videos impressed the farmers, and the ball started rolling. Juliette Atoo, a member of one of the farmer groups and primary school teacher in Akecoyere village, convinced her colleagues of the power of these videos, so Barapwo Primary School became Rebecca’s second client, offering her another unique experience.

“The children were so interested to learn and when I went back a month later, I was truly amazed to see how they had applied so many things in their school garden: the spacing of vegetables, the use of ash to protect their vegetable crops, compost making, and so on. The school was happy because they no longer needed to spend money on agrochemicals, and they could offer the children a healthy, organic lunch,” says Rebecca.

As she grew more confident, new contracts with other schools soon followed. For each client Rebecca negotiates the price depending on the travel distance, accommodation, and how many children watch the videos. Often five videos are screened per day for two consecutive days, earning her between 120,000 and 200,000 Ugandan Shillings (30 to 50 Euros). Schools will continue to be important clients, because the Ugandan government has made skill training compulsory. Besides home economics and computer skills, students can also choose agriculture, so all schools have a practical school farm and are potential clients.

While she continues to engage with schools, over time Rebecca has partly changed her strategy. She now no longer actively approaches farmer groups, but rather explores which NGOs work with farmers in the region and what projects they have or are about to start. Having searched the internet and done background research, it is easier to convince project staff of the value of her video-based advisory service.

As Rebecca, now the mother of four children, does not want to miss the opportunity to respond to the growing number of requests for her video screening service, she is currently training a man and a woman in their early twenties to strengthen her team.

Having never forgotten her own suffering as a young mother, and having experienced the opportunities offered by the Access Agriculture videos, Rebecca also decided to establish her own community-based organisation: the Network for Women in Action, which she runs as a charity. Having impressed her parents, in 2019 they allowed her to set up a demonstration farm (Newa Api Green Farm) on family land, where she trains young girls and pregnant teenage school dropouts in artisan skills such as, making paper bags, weaving baskets and making beehives from locally available materials.

Traditional beehives are made from tree trunks, clay pots, and woven baskets smeared with cow dung that are hung in the trees. To collect the honey, farmers climb the trees and destroy the colonies. From one of the videos made in Kenya, the members of the association learned how to smoke out the bees, and not destroy them.

From another video made in Nepal, Making a Modern Beehive, the women learned to make improved beehives in wooden boxes, which they construct for farmers upon order. From the video, they realised that the currently used bee boxes were too large. “Because small colonies are unable to generate the right temperature within the large hives, we only had a success rate of 50%. Now we make our hives smaller, and 8 out 10 hives are colonised successfully,” says Rebecca.

Young women often have no land of their own, so members who want to can place their beehives on the demo farm. “We also have a honey press. All members used to bring their honey to our farm. But from the video Turning Honey into Money, we learned that we can easily sieve the honey through a clean cloth after we have put the honey in the sun. So now, women can process the honey directly at their homes.”

The bee business has become a symbol of healing. Farmers understand that their crops benefit from bees, so the young women beekeepers are appreciated for their service to the farming community. But also, parents who had expelled their pregnant daughter, embarrassed by societal judgement, begin to accept their entrepreneurial daughter again as she sends cash and food to her parents.

“We even trained young women to harvest honey, which traditionally only men do. When people in a village see our young girls wearing a beekeeper’s outfit and climbing trees, they are amazed. It sends out a powerful message to young girls that, even if you become a victim of early motherhood, there is always hope. Your life does not end,” concludes Rebecca.

 

Kindermoeders weer hoop geven

Tienermeisjes zijn kwetsbaar en als ze zwanger worden gaan maatschappijen vaak op verschillende manieren met hen om. In Oeganda worden ze allerlei namen gegeven, zoals een slecht persoon, een schande voor de ouders en zelfs een prostituee. Niemand wil dat hun kinderen met hen omgaan omdat ze als een slechte invloed worden beschouwd. Ouders verstoten hun dochters vaak uit de familie en vertellen hen dat hun leven voorbij is. Dit is wat Rebecca Akullu meemaakte op 17-jarige leeftijd. Maar Rebecca is niet zoals ieder ander meisje.

Na de geboorte van haar baby spaarde ze geld om naar de universiteit te gaan en haalde in 2018 een diploma in bedrijfswetenschappen. Rebecca kreeg al snel een baan als boekhouder bij de Aryodi Bee Farm in Lira, in het noorden van Oeganda, een regio met een hoge jeugdwerkloosheid die nog herstellende is van de opstand van Lord’s Resistance Army, een gewelddadige rebellengroepering. De directeur waardeerde haar werk zo erg dat hij haar in dienst nam.

“In de loop der jaren ontwikkelde ik een echte passie voor bijen,” vertelt Rebecca, “en door praktische training werd ik zelf een expert in het houden van bijen. Telkens als ik de kans kreeg om boeren te bezoeken, was ik geschokt om te zien hoe ze het milieu vernietigden en vervuilden met landbouwchemicaliën, dus ik raakte diep overtuigd van de noodzaak om voor ons milieu te zorgen.”

Dus toen Access Agriculture een oproep deed voor jonge ondernemers om landbouwadviseurs te worden met een projector op zonne-energie om trainingsvideo’s voor boeren te vertonen, schreef Rebecca zich in. Nadat ze was geselecteerd als Entrepreneur for Rural Access (ERA), ontving ze de apparatuur en de training in 2021. Aanvankelijk bleef ze part-time werken, doch tegen het einde van het jaar nam ze ontslag om volledig op eigen benen te staan. Om haar nieuwe bedrijfsdienst te promoten was moed nodig. Gevraagd naar haar eerste marketingpoging, zei Rebecca dat ze haar gemeenschap in de kerk informeerde, aan het einde van de zondagsdienst.

“De eerste keer dat ik video’s moest vertonen aan een groep van 30 boeren, was ik echt bang. Ik vroeg me af of de apparatuur zou werken, naar welke video’s de boeren zouden vragen en of ik hun vragen na afloop zou kunnen beantwoorden,” herinnert Rebecca zich. Haar bezorgdheid verdween al snel. Boeren wilden weten welke video’s ze had over maïs, dus liet ze er verschillende zien, waaronder die over de fall armyworm, een ernstige plaag die hele gewassen vernietigt. Boeren leerden hoe ze hun velden in de gaten konden houden om de plaag vroegtijdig te ontdekken en ze begonnen houtas te gebruiken in plaats van giftige pesticiden om de plaag te bestrijden.

Rebecca werd gevraagd om gedurende een aantal maanden tweewekelijkse shows te organiseren en doet dit nog steeds wanneer haar dat wordt gevraagd. Na onderhandeling met de leider van de lokale boerenorganisatie betaalt elke boer 1.000 Oegandese Shilling (0,25 euro) per show, waarbij ze drie tot vijf video’s in de lokale Luo-taal bekijken en bespreken. Sommige video’s zijn alleen in het Engels beschikbaar, dus vertaalt Rebecca ze voor de boeren. “Maar het is niet gemakkelijk om geld in te zamelen van individuele boeren en hen te mobiliseren voor elke show,” zegt ze.

De video’s maakten indruk op de boeren en de bal ging aan het rollen. Juliette Atoo, lid van een van de boerengroepen en lerares op een basisschool in het dorp Akecoyere, overtuigde haar collega’s van de kracht van deze video’s en zo werd de Barapwo basisschool Rebecca’s tweede klant, wat haar weer een unieke ervaring opleverde.

“De kinderen waren zo geïnteresseerd om te leren en toen ik een maand later terugging, was ik echt verbaasd om te zien hoe ze zoveel dingen hadden toegepast in hun schooltuin: de afstand tussen groenten, het gebruik van as om hun groentegewassen te beschermen, compost maken, enzovoort. De school was blij omdat ze geen geld meer hoefden uit te geven aan landbouwchemicaliën en ze de kinderen een gezonde, biologische lunch konden aanbieden,” herinnert Rebecca zich.

Naarmate ze meer vertrouwen kreeg, volgden al snel nieuwe contracten met andere scholen. Voor elke klant onderhandelt Rebecca over de prijs, afhankelijk van de afstand die moet worden afgelegd, de accommodatie en het aantal kinderen dat de video’s bekijkt. Vaak worden er vijf video’s per dag vertoond gedurende twee opeenvolgende dagen, waarmee ze tussen de 120.000 en 200.000 Oegandese Shillings (30 tot 50 euro) verdient. Scholen blijven belangrijke klanten, omdat de Oegandese overheid vaardigheidstraining verplicht heeft gesteld. Naast huishoudkunde en computervaardigheden kunnen leerlingen ook kiezen voor landbouw, dus alle scholen hebben een praktische schoolboerderij en zijn potentiële klanten.

Hoewel ze contact blijft houden met scholen, heeft Rebecca in de loop der tijd haar strategie deels gewijzigd. Ze benadert nu niet langer actief boerengroepen, maar onderzoekt welke NGO’s met boeren in de regio werken en welke projecten ze hebben of op het punt staan te starten. Nadat ze op internet heeft gezocht en achtergrondonderzoek heeft gedaan, is het gemakkelijker om projectmedewerkers te overtuigen van de waarde van de op video gebaseerde voorlichtingsdienst.

Omdat Rebecca, inmiddels moeder van vier kinderen, de kans niet wil missen om in te gaan op het toenemende aantal aanvragen voor haar video-adviesdienst, leidt ze momenteel een jonge man en jonge vrouw van begin twintig op om haar team te versterken.

Rebecca is haar eigen lijden als jonge moeder nooit vergeten en heeft de mogelijkheden ervaren die de video’s van Access Agriculture bieden. Daarom heeft ze ook besloten om haar eigen gemeenschapsorganisatie op te richten: het Netwerk voor Vrouwen in Actie, dat ze als liefdadigheidsinstelling runt. Nadat ze indruk had gemaakt op haar ouders, gaven ze haar in 2019 toestemming om een demonstratieboerderij (Newa Api Green Farm) op te zetten op het land van haar familie. Hier traint ze jonge meisjes en zwangere schoolverlaters in ambachtelijke vaardigheden, zoals het maken van papieren zakken, het weven van manden en het maken van bijenkorven met behulp van lokaal beschikbare materialen.

Traditionele bijenkorven zijn gemaakt van boomstammen, kleipotten en gevlochten manden besmeerd met koeienmest die in de bomen worden gehangen. Om de honing te verzamelen klimmen de boeren in de bomen en vernietigen ze de kolonies. Op een van de video’s die in Kenia werd gemaakt, leerden de leden van de vereniging hoe ze de bijen konden uitroken en niet vernietigen.

Op een andere video, gemaakt in Nepal, leerden de vrouwen houten bijenkasten te maken, die ze op bestelling voor boeren bouwen. Door de video realiseerden ze zich dat de huidige bijenkasten (Top Bar Hive) te groot waren. “Omdat kleine volken niet in staat zijn om de juiste temperatuur in de grote bijenkasten te genereren, hadden we slechts een succespercentage van 50%. Nu maken we onze bijenkasten kleiner en worden 8 op de 10 bijenkasten succesvol gekoloniseerd,” zegt Rebecca.

Jonge vrouwen hebben vaak geen eigen land, dus leden die dat willen kunnen hun bijenkorven op de demoboerderij zetten. “We hebben ook een honingpers. Vroeger brachten alle leden hun honing naar onze boerderij. Maar van de video’s hebben we geleerd dat we de honing gemakkelijk kunnen zeven door een schone doek nadat we de honing in de zon hebben gezet. Dus nu kunnen de vrouwen de honing direct bij hen thuis verwerken.”

De bijenteelt is een symbool van genezing geworden. Boeren begrijpen dat hun gewassen baat hebben bij bijen, dus de jonge imkervrouwen worden gewaardeerd voor hun diensten aan de boerengemeenschap. Maar ook ouders die eerst hun zwangere dochter hadden weggestuurd, beschaamd door het sociale stigma, beginnen hun ondernemende dochter weer te accepteren nu ze geld en voedsel naar haar ouders sturen.

“We hebben zelfs jonge vrouwen opgeleid tot honingoogsters, iets wat traditioneel alleen mannen doen. Als mensen in een dorp onze jonge meisjes in imkeroutfit in bomen zien klimmen, zijn ze verbaasd. Het is een krachtige boodschap voor jonge meisjes dat er altijd hoop is, zelfs als je het slachtoffer wordt van vroeg moederschap. Je leven is niet voorbij,” besluit Rebecca.

Neighborhood trees August 20th, 2023 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Trees make a city feel like a decent place to live. That often means planting the trees, which help to cool cities, sequester carbon and provide a habitat for birds and other wildlife. But large-scale tree planting in a city can be difficult.

Cochabamba, Bolivia is one of many fast-growing, tropical cities. In the not-too-distant future, most of the world’s people may live in a city like this. Cochabamba is nestled in a large Andean valley, but in the last twenty years, the city has also spread into the nearby Sacaba Valley, which was formerly devoted to growing rainfed wheat. As late as the 1990s, the small town of Sacaba was just a few blocks wide. Now 220,000 people live in that valley, which has become part of metropolitan Cochabamba. The wheat fields of Sacaba have been replaced by a maze of asphalt streets, and neat homes of brick, cement and tile.

I was in Sacaba recently with my wife Ana, who introduced me to some people who are planting trees along the banks of a dry wash, the Waych’a Mayu. It was once a seasonal stream, but it is now dry all year. It has been blocked upstream by people who have built streets and causeways over it.

For the past 18 months, an architect, Alain Vimercati, and an agroforester, Ariel Ayma, have been working with local neighborhoods in Sacaba to organize tree planting. That included many meetings with the leaders and the residents of 12 grassroots neighborhood associations (OTBs—organizaciones territoriales de base) to plan the project.

They decided to plant trees along the Waych’a Mayu, which still had some remnant forests of dryland trees, like molle and jarka. The local people had seen some of the long, shady parks in the older parts of Cochabamba. They were excited to have a green belt, five kilometers long, running through their own neighborhoods. Alain and Ariel, with the NGO Pro Hábitat, produced 2,400 tree seedlings in partnership with the local, public forestry school (ESFOR-UMSS). The local people dug the holes, planted the trees, and built small protective fences around them.

The trees were planted in January. In July, Ana and I went with about 20 people from some of the OTBs to see how the seedlings were doing. When we reached the line of trees, Ariel, the agro-forester, pointed out that the trees had more than doubled in size in just six months. Eighty percent of them had survived. But now they had to be maintained. It has been a dry year, and it hasn’t rained for five months. The trees were starting to wilt. Even so, Ariel encouraged the people by saying “maintenance is more important than water.” He meant that while the trees did need some water, they also needed to be protected. It is important to reassure people that they won’t have to spend money on water. Many people in Sacaba have to buy their water. As we met, cistern trucks drove up and down the streets, offering 200 liters of water for 7 Bolivianos ($1).

The seedlings include a few hardy lemons, but most of the other species are native, dryland trees: guava, broadleaf hopbush (chacatea), jacaranda, tara, tipa, and ceibo.

Ariel used a pick and shovel to show the group how to clear a half-moon around the trees, to catch rain water. He has a Ph.D. in agroforestry, but he seems to love the physical work.

Ariel cut the weeds from around the first tree, and placed them around the base of the trunk, to shade the soil. The representatives from the OTBs, including a retired man, and a woman carrying a baby, quickly agreed to meet a week later, and to bring more people from each neighborhood, to help take care of the trees.

Ana and I went back the following Saturday. A Bolivian bank had paid for a tanker truck of water (16,000 liters, worth about $44). I was surprised how many people turned out, as many as fifteen or twenty at some OTBs. They used their own picks and shovels to quickly clean out the hole around each tree. Then they waited for the tanker truck to fill their barrels so the people from the neighborhoods could give each thirsty tree a bucketful of water. Ariel explained that a bit of water the first year will help the trees recover from the shock of being transplanted, then they should normally survive on rain water. The neighbors did feel a sense of ownership. Some of them told us that they occasionally poured a bucket of recycled water on the trees near their homes.

Ariel is also a professor of forestry, and some of his students had come to help advise the local people. But the residents did most of the work, and in most OTBs the trees were soon weeded and ready to be watered.

The people have settled in Sacaba from all over highland Bolivia, from Oruro, La Paz, Potosí and rural parts of Cochabamba. They have organized themselves into OTBs, which made it possible for Alain and Ariel to work with the neighborhood associations to plan the greenbelt and plant the trees. The cell phone also helps. A few years ago, people had to be invited by a local leader going door-to-door. At those few neighborhoods where no one showed up, Alain phoned the leader of the OTB, who rang up the neighbors. Sometimes within half an hour of making the first phone call, people were digging out the holes around each tree.

In the rapidly-growing cities of the developing world, many of the new residents are from farming communities, and they have rural skills, useful when planting trees. Their new neighborhoods will be much nicer places to live if they have trees. Hopefully, as this case shows, the tree species will be well suited to the local environment, and the local people will be empowered with a sense of ownership of their green areas.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Alain Vimercati and Ariel Ayma of Pro Hábitat, and to all the people who are planting and caring for the trees.

Scientific names

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (previously Acacia visco)

Guava Psidium guajava

Broadleaf hopbush (common name in Bolivia: chacatea), Dodonaea viscosa

Jacaranda Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-galli

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The cherry on the pie

Experiments with trees

The right way to distribute trees

Videos on caring for trees

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Flowering plants attract the insects that help us

Demi lunes

Managed regeneration

ARBOLES DEL BARRIO

Jeff Bentley, 20 de agosto del 2023

Los árboles hacen que una ciudad sea más amena. A menudo hay que plantar los árboles, que ayudan a refrescar las ciudades, capturar carbono y crear un hábitat para la vida silvestre, como las aves. Pero plantar árboles a gran escala en una ciudad puede ser difícil.

Cochabamba, Bolivia es una de las muchas ciudades tropicales de rápido crecimiento. En un futuro próximo, la mayor parte de la población mundial podría vivir en una ciudad como ésta. Cochabamba está anidada en un gran valle andino, pero en los últimos veinte años la ciudad se ha extendido también al cercano valle de Sacaba, antes sembrado en trigo de secano. En la década de los 1990, la pequeña ciudad de Sacaba sólo tenía unas manzanas de ancho. Ahora viven 220.000 personas en ese valle, que ha pasado a formar parte de la zona metropolitana de Cochabamba. Los trigales de Sacaba han sido sustituidos por un laberinto de calles asfaltadas y bonitas casas de ladrillo, cemento y teja.

Hace poco estuve en Sacaba con mi esposa Ana, que me presentó a unas personas que están plantando árboles a orillas de un arroyo seco, el Waych’a Mayu. Antes era un arroyo estacional, pero ahora está seco todo el año. Ha sido bloqueado río arriba por personas que han construido calles y terraplenes sobre el curso del agua.

Durante los últimos 18 meses, un arquitecto, Alain Vimercati, y un doctor en ciencias silvoagropecuarias, Ariel Ayma, han trabajado con los vecinos de Sacaba para organizar la plantación de árboles. Eso incluyó varias reuniones con los líderes y los residentes de 12 organizaciones territoriales de base (OTBs) para planificar el proyecto.

Decidieron plantar árboles a lo largo del Waych’a Mayu, que aún conservaba algunos bosques remanentes de árboles de secano, como molle y jarka. La población local había visto algunos de los largos parques arboleados de las zonas más antiguas de Cochabamba. Estaban entusiasmados con la idea de tener un cinturón verde de cinco kilómetros que atravesara sus barrios de ellos. Alain y Ariel, con la ONG Pro Hábitat, produjeron 2.400 plantines de árboles en coordinación con la Escuela de Ciencias Forestales (ESFOR-UMSS). Los vecinos cavaron los hoyos, plantaron los árboles y construyeron pequeños cercos protectores alrededor de cada uno.

Los árboles se plantaron en enero. En julio, Ana y yo fuimos con unas 20 personas de algunas de las OTBs a ver cómo iban los plantines. Cuando llegamos a la línea de árboles, Ariel nos dijo que los árboles habían duplicado su tamaño en sólo seis meses. El 80% había sobrevivido. Pero ahora había que mantenerlos. Ha sido un año seco y no ha llovido en cinco meses. Los árboles empezaban a marchitarse. Aun así, Ariel animó a la gente diciendo que “el mantenimiento es más importante que el agua”. Quería decir que, aunque los árboles necesitaban agua, también había que protegerlos. Es importante asegurar a la gente que no tendrá que gastar dinero en agua. Muchos habitantes de Sacaba tienen que comprar el agua. Mientras nos reuníamos, camiones cisterna recorrían las calles ofreciendo 200 litros de agua por 7 bolivianos (1 dólar).

Entre los plantines hay algunos limones resistentes, pero la mayoría de las demás especies son árboles nativos de secano: guayaba, chacatea, jacarandá, tara, tipa y ceibo.

Ariel usó una picota y una pala para mostrar al grupo cómo limpiar una media luna alrededor de los árboles, para recoger el agua de lluvia. Tiene un doctorado, pero parece que le encanta el trabajo físico.

Ariel cortó el monte de alrededor del primer árbol y colocó la challa alrededor de la base del tronco, para dar sombra al suelo. Los representantes de las OTB, entre ellos un jubilado y una mujer con un bebé a cuestas, acordaron rápidamente reunirse una semana más tarde y traer a más gente de cada barrio para ayudar a cuidar los árboles.

Ana y yo volvimos el sábado siguiente. Un banco boliviano había pagado un camión cisterna de agua (16.000 litros, por valor de unos 300 Bolivianos—44 dólares). Me sorprendió la cantidad de gente que acudió, hasta quince o veinte en algunas OTBs. Usaron sus propias palas y picotas para limpiar rápidamente el agujero alrededor de cada árbol. Luego esperaron a que el camión cisterna llenara sus barriles para que los vecinos pudieran dar a cada árbol sediento un cubo lleno de agua. Ariel explicó que un poco de agua el primer año ayudaría a los árboles a recuperarse del shock de ser trasplantados, y que después deberían sobrevivir normalmente con el agua de lluvia. Los vecinos estaban empezando a cuidar a los arbolitos. Algunos nos contaron que de vez en cuando echaban un cubo de agua reciclada en los árboles cercanos a sus casas.

Ariel es también profesor universitario, y algunos de sus alumnos habían venido a ayudar a asesorar a los lugareños. Pero los residentes hicieron la mayor parte del trabajo, y en la mayoría de las OTBs los árboles pronto estaban limpiados y listos para ser regados.

La gente se ha asentado en Sacaba de toda la parte alta de Bolivia, de Oruro, La Paz, Potosí y zonas rurales de Cochabamba. Se han organizado en OTBs, lo que ha permitido a Alain y Ariel trabajar con ellos para planificar el cinturón verde y plantar los árboles. El celular también ayuda. Hace unos años, la gente tenía que ser invitada por un dirigente local que iba puerta en puerta. En los pocos barrios donde no aparecía nadie, Alain telefoneaba al dirigente de la OTB, que llamaba a los vecinos. A veces, media hora después de la primera llamada, la gente ya estaba cavando los agujeros alrededor de cada árbol.

En las ciudades de rápido crecimiento del mundo en vías del desarrollo, muchos de los nuevos residentes vienen de comunidades agrícolas y tienen conocimientos rurales, útiles a la hora de plantar árboles. Sus nuevos barrios serán lugares mucho más agradables para vivir si tienen árboles. Ojalá que, como demuestra este caso, las especies arbóreas se adapten bien al ambiente local y la gente local sea empoderada para adueñarse de sus áreas verdes.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Alain Vimercati y Ariel Ayma de Pro Hábitat, y a todos los vecinos que plantan y cuidan sus árboles.

Nombres científicos

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (antes Acacia visco)

Guayaba Psidium guajava

Chacatea Dodonaea viscosa

Jacarandá Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-gall

También en el blog de Agro-Insight

The cherry on the pie

Experimentos con árboles

La manera correcta de distribuir los árboles

Videos sobre el cuidado de los árboles

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Las plantas con flores atraen a los insectos que nos ayudan

Medias lunas

Regeneración manejada

 

Gabe Brown, agroecology on a commercial scale October 16th, 2022 by

Gabe Brown describes himself as a city boy from Bismarck, North Dakota, whose only dream was to be a farmer. As a young couple, Gabe and his wife, Shelly, bought her parent’s farm. Gabe followed in his father-in-law’s footsteps, with regular plowing and lots of chemical fertilizer. For four years in a row the family lost their crop to the weather: hail, and drought and once all their calves died in a blizzard. Gabe and Shelly both had to take full-time jobs to pay for the farm that they worked on weekends. After four years of failure, by 1998, Gabe planted his corn with very little chemical fertilizer, simply because he was out of money.

Gabe was surprised at how high the yields were. In the four years of crop failure, the soil had been improved by not being plowed, by having the covering of plants remain on the surface of the earth.

An avid learner and experimenter, Gabe attended talks, listened to other innovative farmers and to agricultural scientists. He tried planting mixes of many different plants as cover crops, always combining legumes and grasses. He learned to rotate the cattle in pastures, using electric fences.

Gabe’s cattle graze for a few days or sometimes for just a few hours on one small paddock, before being moved to another. Gabe estimates that the cows eat 25% of the plants and trample the rest. In recent years, Gabe and his son, Paul, have begun grazing sheep, pigs and chickens in the fields after the cattle have left the paddock.

The livestock defecate into the field, manuring it, and the plants respond to the impact of the animals by exuding metabolites (products used by, or made by an organism: usually a small molecule, such as alcohol, amino acids or vitamins). The metabolites from plants enrich the soil. Gabe’s system avoids the need to spread manure, or to cut fodder for the animals, cutting costs for fuel and labor, to save on transportation expenses. The soils on neighboring farms are yellow and lifeless. After some 20 years of practicing regenerative agriculture, Gabe compares the soil on Brown’s Ranch (as he calls his farm) to a crumbly, chocolate cake, and it is full of earthworms and other life.

Gabe openly questions the model taught to US farmers, that they should produce more to “feed the world”. The world already produces enough food to feed 10 billion people, but 30% of it is wasted and many people do not receive enough food because of social and political problems, not agronomic ones.

Gabe doesn’t claim to produce more per acre of land than conventional farmers, but his diverse farm of 5,000 acres (2,000 hectares) yields meat, maize, vegetables, eggs and honey, and more profits than the farms around him. The Browns have earned a local reputation as producers of quality food, which they sell directly to consumers at top prices, at a farm shop on Brown’s Ranch.

American youth are getting out of agriculture, because it doesn’t pay. Avoiding chemicals saves the Browns so much money that Gabe’s son, Paul, is happy to take over the farm, innovating along the way. He invented a mobile chicken coop for free-range hens, for example.

Farmers should be able to make a living while improving the soil that supports the farm. Brown’s Ranch is a large, commercial farm, that earns an income for the family that runs it. This farm is proof of concept: agroecology is not hippie science. Regenerative agriculture can be used to grow high-quality food on a commercial scale, at a profit.

Further reading

Brown, Gabe 2018 Dirt to Soil: One Family’s Journey into Regenerative Agriculture. White River Junction, Vermont: Chelsea Green Publishing.

Related videos

Improved pasture for fertile soil

Rotational grazing

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Rotational grazing

Moveable pasture

Soil for a living planet

From soil fertility to cheese

Creativity of the commons

Killing the soil with chemicals (and bringing it back to life)

The nitrogen crisis

A revolution for our soil

The times they are a changing

The committee of the commons May 22nd, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

I usually take a dim view of bureaucracy, but a committee may help stop overgrazing as much as a good fence, as I learned this April, in the community of Canrey Chico, in Ancash, Peru.

About 1993, almost 30 years ago, a young teacher, Vidal Rondán, was hired to be a ranger in the Huascarán National Park. Two years later, he had been hired by the Mountain Institute, an NGO, to work with local communities in the high Andes around the park. In 1998 Vidal organized the farmers into a local agricultural research committee, also known as a CIAL. The committee had 11 farmer-members elected by their community to do research on a pressing problem.

The community loaned the CIAL a two-hectare plot to do experiments on cattle grazing for the 120 members of the Cordillera Blanca Farmers’ Association, which collectively managed the lands of a former hacienda. The CIAL spent a year studying topics like organic fertilization, irrigation and fencing. The results were so promising that the community gave the committee 40 hectares to do more experiments

As community member Dalia Rodríguez explained, before the CIAL, the cattle roamed loose, eating whatever grasses they wanted. Such permissive grazing may seem fine, but over the years the cows and sheep eat all their favorite grasses down to the nub, and the nasty plants encroach on the pasture.

In the 1990s, when the community learned about the CIAL’s research, they began rotating the cattle between smaller, fenced areas. That obliged the livestock to eat more plant species, not just the tastiest ones. As doña Delia explained, in the dry season, folks began keeping the cattle on open pasture in the high country, and in the rainy season moving the cows to fenced grazing closer to the farmsteads.

The members of the Cordillera Blanca farmers’ association own about 600 head of cows, including 58 that are managed collectively. To avoid overgrazing, each community member is limited to a maximum of 25 cows. Movements and numbers of animals are overseen by a board of directors of the Cordillera Blanca Farmers’ Association, which has a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer and various committees on areas like grazing, equipment, and fence. The board members and the committees meet once a month.

Paul and Marcella and I were lucky enough to visit Cordillera Blanca for one of their monthly meetings, which started promptly at 9 AM. Weather-beaten farmers, dressed in their work clothes, filled the small room of an old adobe house. After a while they sent word to Vidal, to say that we could come inside. We briefly discussed our project to film a video about grazing. They gave us permission, and then politely dismissed us. They had business to attend to, and they could manage without any advice from friendly outsiders.

These committees decide when to move cattle down from the high country. They make sure that they don’t put the livestock into a pasture until the grass has recovered, and the seed heads are mature enough to self-seed the next year’s pasture. The board and the committees decide on when to invest in repairing fences, with the members working together to dig the post holes and stretch the barbed wire. The 120 member households meet as needed, when decisions must be approved by all community members.

The board also hires a community cowboy, who along with his wife milks all of the cows in the collective herd and sells the milk back to local women, who make cheese, which they sell. Doña Delia explains that they sell the cheese locally or feed it to their families. Selling the milk allows the community to earn an income to invest in fences, sprinkler irrigation or other tools. Rotational grazing and fences save the farmers time; they no longer have to spend hours looking for their cows.

Vidal and the CIAL are still jointly researching agricultural innovations, which the community manages within their own structure of committees. Fences may be useful bits of hardware for managing livestock, but a system of farmer-managed committees can be the software that makes the  communal grazing land work.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Soil for a living planet

Mother and calf

Further reading

Bentley, Jeffery W., Sylvie Priou, Pedro Aley, Javier Correa, Róger Torres, Hermeregildo Equise, José Luis Quiruchi & Oscar Barea 2006 “Method, Creativity and CIALs.” International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology 5(1):90-105.

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos with farmers like doña Delia was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Vidal Rondán of the Mountain Institute for introducing us to the community.

Videos on community organization

Village savings and loan associations

Farmers’ rights to seeds: experiences from Guatemala

Working in groups to save water

COMITÉ CAMPESINO

Jeff Bentley, 22 de mayo del 2022

Normalmente no soporto la burocracia, pero un comité puede ayudar a frenar el sobrepastoreo, junto con un buen cerco, como aprendí este mes de abril en la comunidad de Canrey Chico, en Ancash, Perú.

Hacia 1993, hace casi 30 años, un joven profesor, Vidal Rondán, fue contratado como guardaparque en el Parque Nacional Huascarán. Dos años después, fue contratado por el Instituto Montaño, una ONG, para trabajar con las comunidades locales en las faldas andinas, alrededor del parque. En 1998, Vidal organizó a los agricultores en un comité local de investigación agrícola, también conocido como CIAL. El comité tenía 11 miembros agricultores elegidos por su comunidad para investigar un problema serio.

La comunidad prestó al CIAL una parcela de dos hectáreas para hacer experimentos sobre el pastoreo con los 120 miembros de la Asociación Campesina de Cordillera Blanca, que maneja colectivamente las tierras de una antigua hacienda. Después de que el CIAL pasara un año estudiando temas como la fertilización orgánica, el riego y los cercos, los resultados fueron tan prometedores que la comunidad prestó al comité 40 hectáreas para trabajar específicamente en el pastoreo.

Como explicó Dalia Rodríguez, miembro de la comunidad, antes del CIAL el ganado andaba suelto, comiendo los pastos que le daban la gana. Un pastoreo tan permisivo puede parecer agradable, pero con el paso de los años las vacas y las ovejas se comen todas sus hierbas favoritas al ras del suelo, y las plantas desagradables invaden el pasto.

En la década de los 1990, cuando la comunidad aprendió de las investigaciones del CIAL, empezaron a rotar el ganado entre secciones más pequeñas y cercadas. Eso  obliga al ganado a comer más especies, no sólo las más sabrosas. Como explicó doña Delia, la gente empezó a dejar el ganado en los pastos altos en la época seca, y en la estación lluviosa se bajaban a los pastos cercados más cercanos a las casas de la gente.

Los miembros de la Asociación Campesina  Cordillera Blanca tienen unas 600 cabezas de ganado, de las cuales 58 se manejan colectivamente. Para evitar el sobrepastoreo, cada miembro de la comunidad está limitado a un máximo de 25 vacas. Los movimientos y el número de animales son supervisados por una junta directiva de la Asociación, que tiene un presidente, un vicepresidente, un secretario, una tesorera y varios comités sobre temas como el pastoreo, los equipos y el cercado. Los miembros de la junta directiva y los comités se reúnen una vez al mes.

Paul, Marcella y yo tuvimos la suerte de visitar Cordillera Blanca para asistir a una de sus reuniones mensuales, que comenzó puntualmente a las 9 de la mañana. Los campesinos quemados del sol, vestidos con su ropa de trabajo, llenaban la pequeña sala de una vieja casa de adobe. Pasado un rato, avisaron a Vidal de que podíamos entrar. Hablamos brevemente de nuestro proyecto de filmar un video sobre el pastoreo. Nos dieron permiso, y luego nos dejaron salir. Tenían asuntos que atender, y podían arreglárselas sin el consejo de gente de afuera.

Estos comités deciden cuándo bajar el ganado de la zona alta. Se aseguran de no poner el ganado en un pasto hasta que se haya recuperado y está echando espigas, para auto-sembrar el pasto del año siguiente. La junta directiva y los comités deciden cuándo invertir en la reparación de los cercos, y los miembros trabajan juntos para plantar los postes y tender el alambre de púas. Los 120 hogares miembros se reúnen cuando es necesario, y las decisiones deben ser aprobadas por todos los miembros de la comunidad.

La junta también contrata a un vaquero de la comunidad, que junto con su esposa ordeña todas las vacas del rebaño colectivo y vende la leche a las mujeres de la zona, que hacen queso. Doña Delia explica que venden el queso localmente o se lo dan a sus familias. La venta de la leche permite a la comunidad obtener ingresos para invertir en cercos, riego por aspersión u otras herramientas. El pastoreo rotativo y los cercos ahorran tiempo a los ganaderos, que ya no tienen que pasar horas buscando a sus vacas.

Vidal y el CIAL siguen investigando conjuntamente las innovaciones agrícolas, que la comunidad gestiona dentro de su propia estructura de comités. Los cercos sirven para manejar el ganado, pero algunos comités organizados por los agricultores puede ser el software que haga funcionar el pastoreo comunal.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Soil for a living planet

Mother and calf

Lectura adicional

Bentley, Jeffery W., Sylvie Priou, Pedro Aley, Javier Correa, Róger Torres, Hermeregildo Equise, José Luis Quiruchi & Oscar Barea 2006 “Method, Creativity and CIALs.” International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology 5(1):90-105.

Agradecimientos

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos agricultor-a-agricultor con agricultoras como doña Delia fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Vidal Rondán del Instituto Montaño por presentarnos a la comunidad.

Videos sobre organizaciones comunitarias

Ahorro y crédito rural

Derechos de los agricultores y agricultoras a la semilla: Guatemala

Working in groups to save water

 

Design by Olean webdesign