WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

The market mafia April 9th, 2023 by

The market mafia

Nederlandse versie hieronder

In a previous blog, I wrote how smallholder, organic farmers in Bolivia struggle to sell their healthy, natural produce to an urban and peri-urban audience that is only slowly awakening to the health risks of  food produced with agrochemicals.

While the weekly home delivery service is a new way to sell fresh produce directly to consumers, the age-proven, open-air markets offer a more obvious way to sell ecological food. As in much of the developing world, weekly neighbourhood markets are widespread in Bolivia, but they come with their own challenges when newcomers want to enter the scene.

The NGO Agrecol Andes has been working for years to help agroecological farmers sell their produce directly on local markets, rather than through middle men. To help farmers in the department of Cochabamba obtain a space to sell in existing markets, Agrecol obtained agreements with various local authorities to help their farmers sell at markets. But that seemed to be the easiest part.

From experience Agrecol Andes learned that if one of the ecological farmers did not have vegetables or fruits to sell during one week, their place would be snapped up by a conventional vendor, who would keep the spot forever. So Agrecol increased its efforts to strengthen farmer groups, which let members to supply each other with ecological produce and ensure weekly presence on the markets.

But competition among market vendors is a fierce. While local authorities may set market rules, the real power is held by a few influential vendors. If the old vendors object, the farmer-sellers may permanently be blocked from the market.

“In some cases, my colleagues have been negotiating with specific market vendors for several years, but until they obtain permission, they are never sure whether their efforts will bear any fruits,” explains Augusto Lizárraga, a young staff from Agrecol Andes who accompanied us during most of our filming days.

Clearly, for individual farmers to start selling ecological produce directly on markets, the challenges are huge. Working in groups helps, and so does the support of local authorities. But institutional support like the one offered by Agrecol Andes is essential to support agroecological farmers and trigger changes towards healthier and fairer food systems.

The market mafia may be invisible, but it does exist.

Watch our video on: How to sell ecological food

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The struggle to sell healthy food

Marketing as a performance

A young lawyer comes home to farm

An exit strategy

 

De markt maffia

In een vorig blog schreef ik hoe kleine, biologische boeren in Bolivia worstelen om hun gezonde, natuurlijke producten te verkopen aan een stedelijk en peri-stedelijk publiek dat zich maar langzaam bewust wordt van de gezondheidsrisico’s van voedsel dat met landbouwchemicaliën is geproduceerd.

Hoewel de wekelijkse thuisbezorging een nieuwe manier is om verse producten rechtstreeks aan de consument te verkopen, bieden de beproefde openluchtmarkten een meer voor de hand liggende manier om gezond, ecologisch voedsel te verkopen. Zoals in veel ontwikkelingslanden zijn ook in Bolivia wekelijkse buurtmarkten wijdverbreid, maar ze gaan gepaard met hun eigen uitdagingen wanneer nieuwkomers hun intrede willen doen.

De NGO Agrecol Andes zet zich al jaren in om agro-ecologische boeren te helpen hun producten rechtstreeks op lokale markten te verkopen, in plaats van via tussenpersonen. Om boeren in het departement Cochabamba te helpen een plek te krijgen op bestaande markten, verkreeg Agrecol overeenkomsten met verschillende lokale autoriteiten om hun boeren te helpen op markten te verkopen. Maar dat leek het gemakkelijkste deel.

Uit ervaring leerde Agrecol Andes dat als een van de ecologische boeren gedurende een week geen groenten of fruit had om te verkopen, haar plaats zou worden ingenomen door een conventionele verkoper, die de plaats voor altijd zou behouden. Dus verhoogde Agrecol haar inspanningen om boerengroepen te versterken, waardoor de leden elkaar ecologische producten kunnen leveren en een wekelijkse aanwezigheid op de markten kunnen garanderen.

Maar de concurrentie tussen de marktkooplui is hevig. Hoewel de plaatselijke autoriteiten de marktregels vaststellen, is de echte macht in handen van een paar invloedrijke verkopers. Als de oude verkopers bezwaar maken, kunnen de boerenverkopers permanent van de markt worden geweerd.

“In sommige gevallen onderhandelen mijn collega’s al jaren met bepaalde marktkooplui, maar zolang ze geen toestemming krijgen, weten ze nooit zeker of hun inspanningen vruchten zullen afwerpen,” legt Augusto Lizárraga uit, een jonge medewerker van Agrecol Andes die ons tijdens de meeste van onze filmdagen vergezelde.

Het is duidelijk dat de uitdagingen voor individuele boeren om ecologische producten rechtstreeks op markten te gaan verkopen enorm zijn. Werken in groepen helpt, net als de steun van lokale autoriteiten. Maar institutionele steun zoals die van Agrecol Andes is essentieel om agro-ecologische boeren te ondersteunen en veranderingen in de richting van gezondere en eerlijkere voedselsystemen op gang te brengen.

De marktmaffia mag dan onzichtbaar zijn, ze bestaat wel degelijk.

Bekijk onze video: How to sell ecological food

Gerelateerde Agro-Insight blogs

The struggle to sell healthy food

Marketing as a performance

A young lawyer comes home to farm

An exit strategy

Pheromone traps are social March 26th, 2023 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Farmers like insecticides because they are quick, easy to use, and fairly cheap, especially if you ignore the health risks.

Fortunately, alternatives are emerging around the world. Entomologists are developing traps made of pheromones, the smells that guide insects to attack, or congregate or to mate. Each species has its own sex pheromone, which researchers can isolate and synthesize. Insects are so attracted to sex pheromones that they can even be used to make traps.

I had seen pheromone traps before, on small farms in Nepal, so I was pleased to see two varieties of pheromone traps in Bolivia.

Paul and Marcella and I were filming a video for farmers on the potato tuber moth, a pest that gets into potatoes in the field and in storage. Given enough time, the larvae of the little tuber moths will eat a potato into a soggy mass of frass.

We visited two farms with Juan Almanza, a talented agronomist who is helping farmers try pheromone traps, among other innovations.

A little piece of rubber is impregnated with the sex pheromone that attracts the male tuber moth. The rubber is hung from a wire inside a plastic trap. One type of trap is like a funnel, where the moths can fly in, but can’t get out again. The males are attracted to the smell of a receptive female, but are then locked in a trap with no escape. They never mate, and so the females cannot lay eggs.

Farmers Pastor Veizaga and Irene Claros showed us traps they had made at home, using an old bottle of cooking oil. The bottle is filled partway with water and detergent. The moth flies around the bait until it stumbles into the detergent water, and dies.

All of the farmers we met were impressed with these simple traps and how many moths they killed. A few of these safe, inexpensive traps, hanging in a potato storage area, could be part of the solution to protecting the potato, loved around the world by people and by moths alike. The pheromone trap could give the farmers a chance to outsmart the moths, without insecticides. But the farmers can’t adopt pheromone traps on their own; it has to be a social effort.

Some ten years previously, pheromone baits were distributed to anyone in Colomi who wanted one. As Juan Almanza explained to me, the mayor’s office announced on the radio that people would receive bait if they took an empty plastic jug to the plant clinic, which operated every Thursday at the weekly fair in the municipal market. Oscar Díaz, who then ran the plant clinic for Proinpa, gave pheromone bait, valued at 25 Bs. (about $3.60), to hundreds of people. Farmers made the traps and used them for years. It may take five years or more for the pheromone to be exhausted from the bait.

Now, only a handful of households in Colomi still use the traps. But most farmers there do spray agrochemicals. Agrochemicals and their alternatives compete in an unfair contest, due in part to policy failure and profit motive. If pesticide shops all closed and farmers did not know where to buy more insecticide, its use would fall off quickly.

Had the municipal government periodically sold pheromone bait to farmers, they might still be making and using the traps.

During Covid, we all learned about supply chains. Sometimes, appropriate tools for agroecology, like pheromone traps, also rely on supplies from outside the farm community.  Manufacturers, distributors, and local government can all be part of this supply chain. Farmers can’t do it on their own.

Acknowledgment

Juan Almanza works for the Proinpa Foundation. He and Paul Van Mele read and commented on a previous version of this story.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Don’t eat the peals

The best knowledge is local and scientific

LAS TRAMPAS DE FEROMONAS SON SOCIALES

Jeff Bentley, 26 de marzo del 2023

A los agricultores les gustan los insecticidas porque son rápidos, fáciles de usar y bastante baratos, sobre todo si se ignoran los riesgos para la salud.

Afortunadamente, están surgiendo alternativas en todo el mundo. Los entomólogos están desarrollando trampas de feromonas, los olores que guían a los insectos para atacar, congregarse o aparearse. Cada especie tiene su propia feromona sexual, que los investigadores pueden aislar y sintetizar. Los insectos se sienten tan atraídos por las feromonas sexuales que se los puede usar para hacer trampas.

Yo había visto trampas de feromonas antes, usadas en la agricultura familiar en Nepal, así que me alegró ver dos variedades de trampas de feromonas en Bolivia.

Paul, Marcella y yo estábamos filmando un vídeo para agricultores sobre la polilla de la papa, una plaga que se mete en las papas en el campo y en almacén. Con el suficiente tiempo, las larvas de la pequeña polilla de la papa se comen una papa hasta convertirla en una masa de excremento.

Visitamos dos familias con Juan Almanza, un agrónomo de talento que está ayudando a los agricultores a probar trampas de feromonas, entre otras innovaciones.

Se impregna un trocito de goma con la feromona sexual que atrae al macho de la polilla de la papa. La goma se cuelga de un alambre dentro de una trampa de plástico. Un tipo de trampa es como un embudo, donde las polillas pueden entrar volando, pero no pueden salir. Los machos se sienten atraídos por el olor de una hembra receptiva, pero entonces quedan encerrados en una trampa sin salida. Nunca se aparean, así que las hembras no pueden poner huevos.

Agricultores Pastor Veizaga e Irene Claros nos enseñaron trampas que habían hecho en casa, usando un viejo bidón de aceite de cocina. La botella se llena hasta la mitad con agua y detergente. La polilla vuela alrededor del cebo hasta que tropieza con el agua del detergente y muere.

Todos los agricultores que conocimos quedaron impresionados con estas sencillas trampas y con la cantidad de polillas que mataban. Unas pocas de estas trampas seguras y baratas, colgadas en un almacén de papas, podrían ser parte de la solución para proteger la papa, amada en todo el mundo tanto por la gente como por las polillas. La trampa de feromonas podría dar a los agricultores la oportunidad de engañar a las polillas, sin insecticidas. Pero los agricultores no pueden adoptar las trampas de feromonas por sí solos; tiene que ser un esfuerzo social.

Hace unos diez años, en Colomi se distribuyeron cebos de feromonas a todos que querían tener uno. Según Juan Almanza me explicó, la alcaldía anunciaba por la radio que la gente recibiría cebos si llevaba un bidón de plástico vacía a la clínica de plantas, que funcionaba todos los jueves en la feria semanal, en el mercado municipal. Oscar Díaz, que entonces dirigía la clínica de plantas de Proinpa, entregó cebos de feromonas, valorados en 25 Bs. (unos $3,60), a cientos de personas. Los agricultores fabricaron las trampas y las usaron durante años. El cebo puede mantener su feromona durante unos cinco años o más antes de que se agote.

Ahora, pocos hogares de Colomi siguen usando las trampas. Pero la mayoría de los agricultores si fumigan agroquímicos. Los agroquímicos y sus alternativas compiten en una competencia desleal, debida en parte al fracaso de las políticas y los intereses de lucro. Si todas las tiendas de plaguicidas cerraran sus puertas y los agricultores no supieran dónde comprar más insecticida, su uso caería rápidamente.

Si la alcaldía hubiera vendido periódicamente cebos con feromonas a los agricultores, quizá seguirían haciendo y usando las trampas.

Durante Covid, todos aprendimos acerca de las cadenas de suministro. A veces, las herramientas adecuadas para la agroecología, como las trampas de feromonas, también dependen de insumos externos a la comunidad agrícola.  Los fabricantes, los distribuidores y la administración local pueden formar parte de esta cadena de suministro. Los agricultores no pueden hacerlo solos.

Agradecimiento

Juan Almanza trabaja para la Fundación Proinpa. Él y Paul Van Mele leyeron y comentaron sobre una versión previa de esta historia.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

No te comas las cáscaras

El mejor conocimiento es local y científico

Naturally affordable March 5th, 2023 by

Certified organic farmers often complain that they need higher prices for their produce, but this means that they will only sell to rich people. The poor won’t have access to this healthy food.

I learned this recently from Mariana Alem, a Bolivian biologist of the AGRECOL Andes Foundation, which is working with smallholder producers to grow and sell affordable organic food in low and middle income areas in the Cochabamba Valley, in Bolivia.

Since 2019, Mariana and her colleague María Omonte, an agronomist, have worked with 36 farmers, mostly women, who were already selling produce in local fairs. The farmers self-declared that their produce was free of agrochemicals. The farmers self-declared that their produce was free of agrochemicals. To build rapport in the group, the women organized themselves to visit each other for a peer review. It started as a kind of inspection, but as the women get to know each other, these visits became a chance to exchange seeds or to share information about topics like recipes for controlling pests without chemicals.

Mariana and María found one group of these farmers at a market called El Playón, in a low-income neighborhood on the edge of the urban sprawl of metropolitan Cochabamba. At this market, buyers and sellers are dressed in work cloths, wearing broad brimmed hats of rural women. They are speaking Quechua, as country people do, rather than Spanish as is spoken in the city.

Since the market only started in 2019 it still has an unfinished look. The stalls are handmade from rough lumber.

Paul and Marcella and I meet doña Gladys, who is selling tomatoes for 8 Bolivianos ($1.15) per kilo, a competitive price. Most of the other women try to sell their locotos (hot peppers) or cucumbers in small piles for 5 Bolivianos each, units that poor people are used to  buying.

Others are selling cut flowers and fruit. One of the older women, doña Saturnina, is selling organic peaches, for the same price as conventional ones. Doña Saturnina, who is joined at her stall by her granddaughters, also give us a glass of juice, made from fresh peaches boiled in water, so refreshing.

To offer organic produce at affordable prices, one trick is for farmers to sell directly to consumers. This way, the farmer can charge the retail price. It is easier said than done, because selling is work.

Mariana and María have mentored the women, helping them to make aprons and to identify themselves as self-declared ecological producers. They are not formally certified, but they are producing without agrochemicals.

To sell to retail customers, you have to be at the fair on every market day with a good diversity of products. This group plants many different crops, rather than each person planting the same thing. Then, by sitting near each other the women can attract and share customers. They also increase their range of produce by buying from their neighbor farmers and from wholesalers to sell. Unfortunately, that means that not all of their produce is organic.

With the wisdom of hindsight, Mariana and María insist that the main thing is to be transparent with the consumers when farmers adopt these strategies to supply their stall. . When the women come to sell, each one has a green cloth where they pile up their organic produce. They also have an orange cloth where they are supposed to display any vegetables that they are reselling. The distinction has been a bit too subtle for consumers and a little too hard for the farmer-sellers to manage.

“Did you forget your orange cloth today,” some vendors will chide their neighbors who are selling produce they didn’t grow, as though it were organic.

These are the kinds of learning experiences that one may have while setting up something new. These growing pains aside, the point is that selling healthy, organic food should be for everyone, not just for people who can afford to pay extra. It is important for farmers to get a fair price, while making organic food affordable. Healthy eating shouldn’t be a luxury.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Mariana Alem and Paul Van Mele for valuable comments on a previous version of this blog. Mariana Alem and María Omonte work for the Fundación Agrecol Andes.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Shopping with Mom

The struggle to sell healthy food

At home with agroforestry

NATURALMENTE ACCESIBLE

Los agricultores ecológicos certificados a veces se quejan de que necesitan precios más altos por sus productos, pero esto significa que sólo venderán a la gente rica. Los pobres no tendrán acceso a estos alimentos sanos.

Esto lo aprendí recientemente de Mariana Alem, una bióloga boliviana de la Fundación AGRECOL Andes, que trabaja con pequeños productores para cultivar y vender alimentos orgánicos asequibles en áreas de bajos ingresos en el Valle de Cochabamba, en Bolivia.

Desde 2019, Mariana y su colega María Omonte, agrónoma, han trabajado con 36 agricultores, en su mayoría mujeres, que se auto declaran producir sin agroquímicos. Para generar confianza entre ellas, han organizado que se visiten unas a otras para una revisión entre pares. Comenzó como una especie de inspección, pero a medida que las mujeres se fueron conociendo, estas visitas se convirtieron en una oportunidad para intercambiar semillas o para compartir información sobre cómo controlar las plagas sin agroquímicos.

Mariana y María encontraron a un grupo de éstas productoras en un mercado popular que se llama El Playón, al borde de la expansión urbana de Cochabamba metropolitana. En este mercado, compradores y vendedores usan ropa de trabajo y llevan sombreros de ala ancha de mujer rural. Hablan quechua, como la gente del campo, en lugar de español, como se habla en la ciudad.

Como el mercado no empezó hasta 2019, aún tiene un aspecto inacabado. Los puestos están hechos a mano con madera áspera.

Paul, Marcella y yo nos encontramos con doña Gladys, que vende tomates a 8 bolivianos (1,15 dólares) el kilo, un precio competitivo. La mayoría de las demás mujeres intentan vender sus locotos (chiles) o pepinos en pequeños montones por 5 bolivianos cada uno, unidades que la gente pobre está acostumbrada a comprar.

Otras venden flores cortadas y fruta. Una de las mujeres mayores, doña Saturnina, vende duraznos ecológicos al mismo precio que los convencionales. Doña Saturnina, a quien acompañan en su puesto sus nietas, también nos da un vaso de jugo, hecho con duraznos frescos hervidos en agua, tan refrescante.

Para ofrecer productos ecológicos a precios asequibles, un truco es que los agricultores vendan directamente a los consumidores. De este modo, el agricultor puede cobrar el precio de venta al público. Es más fácil decirlo que hacerlo, porque vender es un trabajo.

Mariana y María han asesorado a las mujeres, ayudándolas a confeccionar mandiles y a identificarse como productoras ecológicas auto-declaradas. No están certificadas formalmente, pero producen sin agroquímicos.

Para vender directo al consumidor, hay que estar en el mercado todos los días de feria con una buena diversidad de productos. Este grupo siembra muchos cultivos diferentes, en lugar de que cada persona plante lo mismo. Así, al sentarse cerca unas de otras, las mujeres pueden atraer y compartir clientes. También aumentan su gama de productos comprando a sus vecinas agricultoras y a mayoristas para revender. Por desgracia, eso significa que no todos sus productos son ecológicos.

En retrospectiva, Mariana y María insisten en que la transparencia al consumidor es lo más importante cuando las productoras realizan este tipo de estrategias para surtir sus puestos. Cuando las mujeres vienen a vender, cada una tiene una manta verde donde amontonan sus productos ecológicos. También tienen una manta anaranjada donde se supone que exponen las verduras que revenden. La distinción ha sido un poco sutil para los consumidores y un poco difícil de manejar para las agricultoras-vendedoras.

“¿Se te ha olvidado hoy la manta anaranjada?, regañan algunas vendedoras a sus vecinas que venden productos que no han cultivado, como si fueran ecológicos.

Así se aprende sobre la marcha cuando uno pone en práctica algo nuevo. Dejando a un lado estos problemas, la cuestión es que la venta de alimentos sanos y ecológicos debería ser para todos, no sólo para quienes pueden permitirse pagar más. Es importante que los agricultores obtengan un precio justo y que los alimentos ecológicos sean accesibles. Comer sano no debería ser un lujo.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Mariana Alem y a Paul Van Mele por sus valiosos comentarios sobre una versión previa de este blog. Mariana Alem y María Omonte trabajan para la Fundación AGRECOL Andes.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

De compras con mamá

The struggle to sell healthy food

En casa con la agroforestería

 

 

The struggle to sell healthy food January 22nd, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Consumers are increasingly realizing the need to eat healthy food, produced without agrochemicals, but on our recent trip to Bolivia we were reminded once more that many organic farmers struggle to sell their produce at a fair price.

The last few days Jeff, Marcella and I have been filming with a group of agroecological farmers in Cochabamba, a city with 1.4 million inhabitants at an altitude of about 2,400 meters. Traditionally, local demand for flowers was high, to use as gifts and decorations at the many festivities, weddings, funerals and family celebrations. When we interview doña Nelly in front of the camera, she explains how many of the women of her agroecological group were into the commercial cut flower business until 5 years ago: “The main reason we abandoned the flower business was that various people in our neighbourhood became seriously sick from the heavy use of pesticides.”

As the women began to produce vegetables instead of flowers, they also took training on ecological farming. They realized that the only way to remain in good health is to care for the health of their soil and the food they consume. All of them being born farmers, the step to start growing organic food seemed a logical one. With the support of a Agrecol Andes, a local NGO that supports agroecological food systems, a group of 16 women embarked on a new journey, full of new challenges.

“Over these past years, we have seen our soil improve again, earthworms and other soil creatures have come back. But I think it will take 10 years before the soil will have fully recovered from the intense misuse of flower growing,” says Nelly.

On Friday morning, we visit the house of one of the members of the group. Various women arrive, carrying their produce in woven bags on their back. Their fresh produce was harvested the day before, washed, weighed, packed and labelled with their group certificate. Internationally recognized organic certification is costly and most farmers in developing countries cannot afford it. So, they use an alternative, more local certification scheme, called Participatory Guarantee System or PGS, whereby member producers evaluate each other. More recently, the group also gets certification from the national government, SENASAG.

Agrecol staff supports the women as they prepare food baskets for their growing number of customers that want their food delivered either at their home or office. Some customers also come and collect their weekly basket at the Agrecol office. Jeff’s wife, Ana, shows us one evening how every week she receives a list of about 4 pages with all produce available that week, and the prices. Until Wednesday noon, the 150 clients are free to select if and what they want to buy. The demand is processed, farmers harvest on Thursday and the fresh food is delivered on Friday morning: a really short food chain with food that has only been harvested the day before it was delivered.

Organizing personalised food baskets weekly is time-consuming. Most farmers also need institutional support as they lack a social network of potential clients in urban centres. Agrecol has invested a lot in sensitising consumers about the need to consume healthy food, using leaflets, social media, fairs and farm visits for consumers. Without support from Agrecol or someone who takes it up as a full-time business, it is difficult for farmers to sell their high-quality produce.

In her interview, Nelly explains that the home delivery was a recent innovation they introduced when the Covid crisis hit, as local markets had closed down, yet people still needed food. Now that public markets re-opened, demand strongly fluctuates from one week to the next, and with the tight profit margins, it might be a challenge to turn it into profitable business. NGOs like Agrecol play a crucial role in helping farmers produce healthy food, and raising the awareness of consumers, who learn to appreciate organic produce.

As Cochabamba is a large city, Agrecol has over the years helped agroecological farmer groups to negotiate with the local authorities to ensure they have a dedicated space on the weekly markets in various parts of the city.

Local authorities have a crucial role to play in supporting ecological and organic farmers that goes way beyond providing training and inspecting fields. Farmers need a fair price and a steady market to sell their produce. Being given a space at conventional, urban markets and dedicated agroecological markets is helping, but in low-income countries very few consumers are willing to pay a little extra for food that is produced free of chemicals. Public procurements by local authorities to provide schools with healthy food may provide a more stable source of revenue. It is no surprise that global movements such as the Global Alliance of Organic Districts (GAOD) have put this as a central theme.

Agroecological farmers who go the extra mile to nurture the health of our planet and the people who live on it, deserve a stable, fair income and peace of mind.

As Nelly concluded in her interview: “It is a struggle, but we have to fight it for the good of our children and those who come after them.”

Related blogs

Better food for better farming

Marketing as a performance

Choosing to farm

An exit strategy

Exit strategy 2.0

Look me in the eyes

Related training videos

Creating agroecological markets

Home delivery of organic produce

 

De strijd om gezond voedsel te verkopen

Consumenten worden zich steeds meer bewust van de noodzaak om gezond voedsel te eten, geproduceerd zonder landbouwchemicaliën, maar tijdens onze recente reis naar Bolivia werden we er opnieuw aan herinnerd dat veel biologische boeren moeite hebben om hun producten tegen een eerlijke prijs te verkopen.

De afgelopen dagen hebben Jeff, Marcella en ik gefilmd met een groep agro-ecologische boeren in Cochabamba, een stad met 1,4 miljoen inwoners op een hoogte van ongeveer 2.400 meter. Traditioneel was de lokale vraag naar bloemen groot, om te gebruiken als geschenk en decoratie bij de vele festiviteiten, bruiloften, begrafenissen en familiefeesten. Als we doña Nelly voor de camera interviewen, legt ze uit hoe veel van de vrouwen van haar agro-ecologische groep tot 5 jaar geleden in de commerciële snijbloemenhandel zaten: “De belangrijkste reden dat we de bloemenhandel hebben opgegeven was dat verschillende mensen in onze buurt ernstig ziek werden door het zware gebruik van pesticiden.”

Toen de vrouwen groenten begonnen te produceren in plaats van bloemen, volgden ze ook een opleiding ecologisch tuinieren. Ze beseften dat de enige manier om gezond te blijven, is te zorgen voor de gezondheid van hun grond en het voedsel dat ze consumeren. Omdat ze allemaal geboren boeren zijn, leek de stap om biologisch voedsel te gaan verbouwen een logische. Met de steun van Agrecol Andes, een lokale NGO die agro-ecologische voedselsystemen ondersteunt, begon een groep van 16 vrouwen aan een nieuwe reis, vol nieuwe uitdagingen.

“De afgelopen jaren hebben we onze grond weer zien verbeteren, regenwormen en andere bodemorganismen zijn teruggekomen. Maar ik denk dat het 10 jaar zal duren voordat de grond volledig hersteld is van het intensieve misbruik van de bloementeelt,” zegt Nelly.

Op vrijdagochtend bezoeken we het huis van een van de leden van de groep. Verschillende vrouwen arriveren, met hun producten in geweven zakken op hun rug. Hun verse producten zijn de dag ervoor geoogst, gewassen, gewogen, verpakt en voorzien van hun groepscertificaat. Internationaal erkende biologische certificering is duur en de meeste boeren in ontwikkelingslanden kunnen zich dat niet veroorloven. Daarom gebruiken ze een alternatief, meer lokaal certificeringssysteem, het zogenaamde Participatory Guarantee System of PGS, waarbij de aangesloten producenten elkaar controleren. Sinds kort wordt de groep ook gecertificeerd door de nationale overheid, SENASAG.

De medewerkers van Agrecol ondersteunen de vrouwen bij het samenstellen van de voedselpakketten voor hun groeiende aantal klanten die hun voedsel thuis of op kantoor geleverd willen krijgen. Sommige klanten komen ook hun wekelijkse mand ophalen in het kantoor van Agrecol. Jeff’s vrouw, Ana, laat ons op een avond zien hoe zij elke week een lijst van ongeveer 4 pagina’s ontvangt met alle producten die die week beschikbaar zijn, en de prijzen. Tot woensdagmiddag zijn de 150 klanten vrij om te kiezen of en wat ze willen kopen. De vraag wordt verwerkt, de boeren oogsten op donderdag en het verse voedsel wordt op vrijdagochtend geleverd: een echt korte voedselketen met voedsel dat pas de dag voor de levering is geoogst.

Het wekelijks organiseren van gepersonaliseerde voedselmanden is tijdrovend. De meeste boeren hebben ook institutionele steun nodig omdat ze geen sociaal netwerk van potentiële klanten in stedelijke centra hebben. Agrecol heeft veel geïnvesteerd in het sensibiliseren van consumenten over de noodzaak van gezonde voeding, met behulp van folders, sociale media, beurzen en boerderijbezoeken voor consumenten. Zonder steun van Agrecol of iemand die er fulltime mee bezig is, is het voor boeren moeilijk om hun kwaliteitsproducten te verkopen.

In haar interview legt Nelly uit dat de thuisbezorging een recente innovatie was die ze introduceerde toen de Covid-crisis toesloeg, omdat de lokale markten gesloten waren, maar de mensen toch voedsel nodig hadden. Nu de openbare markten weer geopend zijn, schommelt de vraag sterk van week tot week, en met de krappe winstmarges kan het een uitdaging zijn om er een winstgevend bedrijf van te maken. NGO’s als Agrecol spelen een cruciale rol door de boeren te helpen gezond voedsel te produceren, en door de consumenten bewuster te maken van biologische producten.

Omdat Cochabamba een grote stad is, heeft Agrecol in de loop der jaren groepen agro-ecologische boeren geholpen bij de onderhandelingen met de lokale autoriteiten om ervoor te zorgen dat zij een speciale plaats krijgen op de wekelijkse markten in verschillende delen van de stad.

Lokale autoriteiten spelen een cruciale rol bij de ondersteuning van ecologische en biologische boeren, die veel verder gaat dan het geven van trainingen en het inspecteren van velden. Boeren hebben een eerlijke prijs en een vaste markt nodig om hun producten te verkopen. Een plaats krijgen op conventionele, stedelijke markten en speciale agro-ecologische markten helpt, maar in lage-inkomenslanden zijn maar weinig consumenten bereid een beetje extra te betalen voor voedsel dat zonder chemicaliën is geproduceerd. Openbare aanbestedingen door lokale overheden om scholen te voorzien van gezond voedsel kunnen een stabielere bron van inkomsten opleveren. Het is geen verrassing dat wereldwijde bewegingen zoals de Global Alliance for Organic Districts (GAOD) dit als een centraal thema stellen.

Agro-ecologische boeren die een stapje extra zetten om de gezondheid van onze planeet en de mensen die erop leven te voeden, verdienen een stabiel, eerlijk inkomen en gemoedsrust.

Zoals Nelly zei in haar interview: “het is een strijd, maar we moeten deze voeren voor het welzijn van onze kinderen en zij die na hen komen.”

Listen before you film December 4th, 2022 by

Listen before you film

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Smallholder farmers always have something thoughtful to say. At Agro-Insight when we film videos, we often start by holding a workshop where we write the scripts with local experts. We write the first draft of the script as a fact sheet. Then we share the fact sheet with communities, so they can validate the text, but also to criticize it, like a peer review.

This week in a peri-urban community on the edge of Cochabamba, Bolivia, we met eight farmers, seven women and a young man, who grow organic vegetables. Their feedback was valuable, and sometimes a little surprising.

For example, one fact sheet on agroecological marketing stressed the importance of trust between growers and consumers, who cannot tell the difference between organic and conventional tomatoes just by looking at them. But these practiced farmers can. They told us that the organic tomatoes have little freckles, and are a bit smaller than conventional tomatoes. That’s the perspective that comes from a lot of experience.

The fact sheet on the potato tuber moth, a serious global pest, had background information and some ideas on control. The moth can be controlled by dusting seed potatoes with chalk (calcium carbonate), a natural, non-metallic mineral. The chalk contains small crystals that irritate and kill the eggs and larvae of the moth. This idea caught the farmers’ imagination. They wanted to know more about the chalk, and where to get it and how to apply it. (It is a white powder, that is commonly sold in hardware stores, as a building material). Our video will have to make carefully explain how to use chalk to control the tuber moth.

The reaction that surprised me the most was from the fact sheet on soil analysis. The fact sheet described two tests, one to analyze pH and another to measure soil carbon. The tests were a bit complex, and a lot to convey in one page. I was prepared for confusion, but instead, we got curiosity. The women wanted to know more about the pH paper, where could they buy it? What would pH tell them about managing their soils? Could we come back and give them a demonstration on soil analysis? Smallholders are interested in soil, and interested in learning more about it.

As we were leaving, we thanked the farmers for their time and help.

They replied that they also wanted to thank us: for listening to them, for taking them into account. “It should always be like this.” They said “New ideas should be developed with farmers, not in the office.”

Paul and Marcella and I will be back later to make videos on these topics, to share with farmers all over the world. Listening to smallholders early in the video-making, before getting out the camera, helps to make sure that other farmers will find the videos relevant when they come out.

 

ESCUCHAR ANTES DE FILMAR

Jeff Bentley, 4 de diciembre del 2022

Los pequeños agricultores siempre tienen algo interesante que decir. En Agro-Insight, cuando filmamos vídeos, solemos empezar por celebrar un taller donde escribimos los guiones con expertos locales. Escribimos el primer borrador del guion en forma de hoja volante. Luego compartimos la hoja volante con las comunidades, para que puedan validar el texto, pero también para que lo critiquen, como una revisión por pares.

Esta semana, en una comunidad periurbana de las afueras de Cochabamba, Bolivia, nos reunimos con ocho agricultores, siete mujeres y un joven, que cultivan verduras orgánicas. Sus comentarios fueron valiosos, y a veces un poco sorprendentes.

Por ejemplo, una hoja volante sobre la comercialización agroecológica destacaba la importancia de la confianza entre los productores y los consumidores, que no pueden diferenciar los tomates ecológicos de los convencionales con sólo mirarlos. Pero estas agricultoras experimentadas sí pueden. Nos dijeron que los tomates ecológicos tienen pequeñas pecas y son un poco más pequeños que los convencionales. Esa es la perspectiva que da la experiencia.

La hoja informativa sobre la polilla de la papa, una grave plaga a nivel mundial, tenía información de fondo y algunas ideas sobre su control. La polilla puede controlarse cubriendo las papas de siembra con tiza (carbonato cálcico), un mineral natural no metálico. La tiza contiene pequeños cristales que irritan y matan los huevos y las larvas de la polilla. Esta idea llamó la atención de los agricultores. Querían saber más sobre la tiza, dónde conseguirla y cómo aplicarla. (Se trata de un polvo blanco que se vende en las ferreterías como material de construcción). Nuestro video tendrá que explicar cuidadosamente cómo usar la tiza para controlar la polilla del tubérculo.

La reacción que más me sorprendió fue la de la hoja volante sobre el análisis del suelo. La hoja volante describía dos pruebas, una para analizar el pH y otra para medir el carbono del suelo. Las pruebas eran un poco complejas, y mucho para transmitir en una página. Yo estaba preparado para la confusión, pero en lugar de eso, obtuvimos curiosidad. Las mujeres querían saber más sobre el papel de pH, ¿dónde podían comprarlo? ¿Qué les diría el pH sobre el manejo de sus suelos? ¿Podríamos volver y hacerles una demostración sobre el análisis del suelo? Los pequeños agricultores se interesan por el suelo y quieren aprender más sobre ello.

Cuando nos íbamos, dimos las gracias a las agricultoras por su tiempo y su ayuda.

Ellas respondieron que también querían darnos las gracias a nosotros: por escucharles, por tenerles en cuenta. “Siempre debería ser así”. Dijeron: “Las nuevas ideas deben desarrollarse con los agricultores, no en la oficina”.

Paul, Marcella y yo volveremos más tarde a hacer videos sobre estos temas, para compartirlos con los agricultores de todo el mundo. Escuchar a los pequeños agricultores al principio de la realización del vídeo, antes de sacar la cámara, ayuda a asegurarse de que otros agricultores encontrarán los videos pertinentes cuando se publiquen.

Design by Olean webdesign