WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Neighborhood trees August 20th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Trees make a city feel like a decent place to live. That often means planting the trees, which help to cool cities, sequester carbon and provide a habitat for birds and other wildlife. But large-scale tree planting in a city can be difficult.

Cochabamba, Bolivia is one of many fast-growing, tropical cities. In the not-too-distant future, most of the world’s people may live in a city like this. Cochabamba is nestled in a large Andean valley, but in the last twenty years, the city has also spread into the nearby Sacaba Valley, which was formerly devoted to growing rainfed wheat. As late as the 1990s, the small town of Sacaba was just a few blocks wide. Now 220,000 people live in that valley, which has become part of metropolitan Cochabamba. The wheat fields of Sacaba have been replaced by a maze of asphalt streets, and neat homes of brick, cement and tile.

I was in Sacaba recently with my wife Ana, who introduced me to some people who are planting trees along the banks of a dry wash, the Waych’a Mayu. It was once a seasonal stream, but it is now dry all year. It has been blocked upstream by people who have built streets and causeways over it.

For the past 18 months, an architect, Alain Vimercati, and an agroforester, Ariel Ayma, have been working with local neighborhoods in Sacaba to organize tree planting. That included many meetings with the leaders and the residents of 12 grassroots neighborhood associations (OTBs‚ÄĒorganizaciones territoriales de base) to plan the project.

They decided to plant trees along the Waych’a Mayu, which still had some remnant forests of dryland trees, like molle and jarka. The local people had seen some of the long, shady parks in the older parts of Cochabamba. They were excited to have a green belt, five kilometers long, running through their own neighborhoods. Alain and Ariel, with the NGO Pro Hábitat, produced 2,400 tree seedlings in partnership with the local, public forestry school (ESFOR-UMSS). The local people dug the holes, planted the trees, and built small protective fences around them.

The trees were planted in January. In July, Ana and I went with about 20 people from some of the OTBs to see how the seedlings were doing. When we reached the line of trees, Ariel, the agro-forester, pointed out that the trees had more than doubled in size in just six months. Eighty percent of them had survived. But now they had to be maintained. It has been a dry year, and it hasn‚Äôt rained for five months. The trees were starting to wilt. Even so, Ariel encouraged the people by saying ‚Äúmaintenance is more important than water.‚ÄĚ He meant that while the trees did need some water, they also needed to be protected. It is important to reassure people that they won‚Äôt have to spend money on water. Many people in Sacaba have to buy their water. As we met, cistern trucks drove up and down the streets, offering 200 liters of water for 7 Bolivianos ($1).

The seedlings include a few hardy lemons, but most of the other species are native, dryland trees: guava, broadleaf hopbush (chacatea), jacaranda, tara, tipa, and ceibo.

Ariel used a pick and shovel to show the group how to clear a half-moon around the trees, to catch rain water. He has a Ph.D. in agroforestry, but he seems to love the physical work.

Ariel cut the weeds from around the first tree, and placed them around the base of the trunk, to shade the soil. The representatives from the OTBs, including a retired man, and a woman carrying a baby, quickly agreed to meet a week later, and to bring more people from each neighborhood, to help take care of the trees.

Ana and I went back the following Saturday. A Bolivian bank had paid for a tanker truck of water (16,000 liters, worth about $44). I was surprised how many people turned out, as many as fifteen or twenty at some OTBs. They used their own picks and shovels to quickly clean out the hole around each tree. Then they waited for the tanker truck to fill their barrels so the people from the neighborhoods could give each thirsty tree a bucketful of water. Ariel explained that a bit of water the first year will help the trees recover from the shock of being transplanted, then they should normally survive on rain water. The neighbors did feel a sense of ownership. Some of them told us that they occasionally poured a bucket of recycled water on the trees near their homes.

Ariel is also a professor of forestry, and some of his students had come to help advise the local people. But the residents did most of the work, and in most OTBs the trees were soon weeded and ready to be watered.

The people have settled in Sacaba from all over highland Bolivia, from Oruro, La Paz, Potosí and rural parts of Cochabamba. They have organized themselves into OTBs, which made it possible for Alain and Ariel to work with the neighborhood associations to plan the greenbelt and plant the trees. The cell phone also helps. A few years ago, people had to be invited by a local leader going door-to-door. At those few neighborhoods where no one showed up, Alain phoned the leader of the OTB, who rang up the neighbors. Sometimes within half an hour of making the first phone call, people were digging out the holes around each tree.

In the rapidly-growing cities of the developing world, many of the new residents are from farming communities, and they have rural skills, useful when planting trees. Their new neighborhoods will be much nicer places to live if they have trees. Hopefully, as this case shows, the tree species will be well suited to the local environment, and the local people will be empowered with a sense of ownership of their green areas.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Alain Vimercati and Ariel Ayma of Pro H√°bitat, and to all the people who are planting and caring for the trees.

Scientific names

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (previously Acacia visco)

Guava Psidium guajava

Broadleaf hopbush (common name in Bolivia: chacatea), Dodonaea viscosa

Jacaranda Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-galli

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The cherry on the pie

Experiments with trees

The right way to distribute trees

Videos on caring for trees

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Flowering plants attract the insects that help us

Demi lunes

Managed regeneration

ARBOLES DEL BARRIO

Jeff Bentley, 20 de agosto del 2023

Los árboles hacen que una ciudad sea más amena. A menudo hay que plantar los árboles, que ayudan a refrescar las ciudades, capturar carbono y crear un hábitat para la vida silvestre, como las aves. Pero plantar árboles a gran escala en una ciudad puede ser difícil.

Cochabamba, Bolivia es una de las muchas ciudades tropicales de r√°pido crecimiento. En un futuro pr√≥ximo, la mayor parte de la poblaci√≥n mundial podr√≠a vivir en una ciudad como √©sta. Cochabamba est√° anidada en un gran valle andino, pero en los √ļltimos veinte a√Īos la ciudad se ha extendido tambi√©n al cercano valle de Sacaba, antes sembrado en trigo de secano. En la d√©cada de los 1990, la peque√Īa ciudad de Sacaba s√≥lo ten√≠a unas manzanas de ancho. Ahora viven 220.000 personas en ese valle, que ha pasado a formar parte de la zona metropolitana de Cochabamba. Los trigales de Sacaba han sido sustituidos por un laberinto de calles asfaltadas y bonitas casas de ladrillo, cemento y teja.

Hace poco estuve en Sacaba con mi esposa Ana, que me present√≥ a unas personas que est√°n plantando √°rboles a orillas de un arroyo seco, el Waych’a Mayu. Antes era un arroyo estacional, pero ahora est√° seco todo el a√Īo. Ha sido bloqueado r√≠o arriba por personas que han construido calles y terraplenes sobre el curso del agua.

Durante los √ļltimos 18 meses, un arquitecto, Alain Vimercati, y un doctor en ciencias silvoagropecuarias, Ariel Ayma, han trabajado con los vecinos de Sacaba para organizar la plantaci√≥n de √°rboles. Eso incluy√≥ varias reuniones con los l√≠deres y los residentes de 12 organizaciones territoriales de base (OTBs) para planificar el proyecto.

Decidieron plantar √°rboles a lo largo del Waych’a Mayu, que a√ļn conservaba algunos bosques remanentes de √°rboles de secano, como molle y jarka. La poblaci√≥n local hab√≠a visto algunos de los largos parques arboleados de las zonas m√°s antiguas de Cochabamba. Estaban entusiasmados con la idea de tener un cintur√≥n verde de cinco kil√≥metros que atravesara sus barrios de ellos. Alain y Ariel, con la ONG Pro H√°bitat, produjeron 2.400 plantines de √°rboles en coordinaci√≥n con la Escuela de Ciencias Forestales (ESFOR-UMSS). Los vecinos cavaron los hoyos, plantaron los √°rboles y construyeron peque√Īos cercos protectores alrededor de cada uno.

Los √°rboles se plantaron en enero. En julio, Ana y yo fuimos con unas 20 personas de algunas de las OTBs a ver c√≥mo iban los plantines. Cuando llegamos a la l√≠nea de √°rboles, Ariel nos dijo que los √°rboles hab√≠an duplicado su tama√Īo en s√≥lo seis meses. El 80% hab√≠a sobrevivido. Pero ahora hab√≠a que mantenerlos. Ha sido un a√Īo seco y no ha llovido en cinco meses. Los √°rboles empezaban a marchitarse. Aun as√≠, Ariel anim√≥ a la gente diciendo que “el mantenimiento es m√°s importante que el agua”. Quer√≠a decir que, aunque los √°rboles necesitaban agua, tambi√©n hab√≠a que protegerlos. Es importante asegurar a la gente que no tendr√° que gastar dinero en agua. Muchos habitantes de Sacaba tienen que comprar el agua. Mientras nos reun√≠amos, camiones cisterna recorr√≠an las calles ofreciendo 200 litros de agua por 7 bolivianos (1 d√≥lar).

Entre los plantines hay algunos limones resistentes, pero la mayoría de las demás especies son árboles nativos de secano: guayaba, chacatea, jacarandá, tara, tipa y ceibo.

Ariel usó una picota y una pala para mostrar al grupo cómo limpiar una media luna alrededor de los árboles, para recoger el agua de lluvia. Tiene un doctorado, pero parece que le encanta el trabajo físico.

Ariel cortó el monte de alrededor del primer árbol y colocó la challa alrededor de la base del tronco, para dar sombra al suelo. Los representantes de las OTB, entre ellos un jubilado y una mujer con un bebé a cuestas, acordaron rápidamente reunirse una semana más tarde y traer a más gente de cada barrio para ayudar a cuidar los árboles.

Ana y yo volvimos el s√°bado siguiente. Un banco boliviano hab√≠a pagado un cami√≥n cisterna de agua (16.000 litros, por valor de unos 300 Bolivianos‚ÄĒ44 d√≥lares). Me sorprendi√≥ la cantidad de gente que acudi√≥, hasta quince o veinte en algunas OTBs. Usaron sus propias palas y picotas para limpiar r√°pidamente el agujero alrededor de cada √°rbol. Luego esperaron a que el cami√≥n cisterna llenara sus barriles para que los vecinos pudieran dar a cada √°rbol sediento un cubo lleno de agua. Ariel explic√≥ que un poco de agua el primer a√Īo ayudar√≠a a los √°rboles a recuperarse del shock de ser trasplantados, y que despu√©s deber√≠an sobrevivir normalmente con el agua de lluvia. Los vecinos estaban empezando a cuidar a los arbolitos. Algunos nos contaron que de vez en cuando echaban un cubo de agua reciclada en los √°rboles cercanos a sus casas.

Ariel es tambi√©n profesor universitario, y algunos de sus alumnos hab√≠an venido a ayudar a asesorar a los lugare√Īos. Pero los residentes hicieron la mayor parte del trabajo, y en la mayor√≠a de las OTBs los √°rboles pronto estaban limpiados y listos para ser regados.

La gente se ha asentado en Sacaba de toda la parte alta de Bolivia, de Oruro, La Paz, Potos√≠ y zonas rurales de Cochabamba. Se han organizado en OTBs, lo que ha permitido a Alain y Ariel trabajar con ellos para planificar el cintur√≥n verde y plantar los √°rboles. El celular tambi√©n ayuda. Hace unos a√Īos, la gente ten√≠a que ser invitada por un dirigente local que iba puerta en puerta. En los pocos barrios donde no aparec√≠a nadie, Alain telefoneaba al dirigente de la OTB, que llamaba a los vecinos. A veces, media hora despu√©s de la primera llamada, la gente ya estaba cavando los agujeros alrededor de cada √°rbol.

En las ciudades de r√°pido crecimiento del mundo en v√≠as del desarrollo, muchos de los nuevos residentes vienen de comunidades agr√≠colas y tienen conocimientos rurales, √ļtiles a la hora de plantar √°rboles. Sus nuevos barrios ser√°n lugares mucho m√°s agradables para vivir si tienen √°rboles. Ojal√° que, como demuestra este caso, las especies arb√≥reas se adapten bien al ambiente local y la gente local sea empoderada para adue√Īarse de sus √°reas verdes.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Alain Vimercati y Ariel Ayma de Pro H√°bitat, y a todos los vecinos que plantan y cuidan sus √°rboles.

Nombres científicos

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (antes Acacia visco)

Guayaba Psidium guajava

Chacatea Dodonaea viscosa

Jacarand√° Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-gall

También en el blog de Agro-Insight

The cherry on the pie

Experimentos con √°rboles

La manera correcta de distribuir los √°rboles

Videos sobre el cuidado de los √°rboles

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Las plantas con flores atraen a los insectos que nos ayudan

Medias lunas

Regeneración manejada

 

The cherry on the pie July 2nd, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Conserving traditional varieties for future generations is worthwhile, yet challenging, especially when it comes to fruit trees, as my wife Marcella and I learned on a recent visit to the castle of Alden Biezen, in Belgium, where for the 20th year a special ‚ÄúCherry‚ÄĚ event was organized.

On the inner court of the 16th-century castle, in the municipality of Bilzen in the province of Limburg, Belgium, various local organizations had installed information booths, on bee-keeping, the juice mobile and traditional fruit varieties.

Belgium wouldn’t be Belgium if there weren’t also stands where you could taste cherry beer and local delicacies, such as thick pancakes stuffed with cherries. Information boards along the pathway offered interesting stories, testimonials and in-depth knowledge of late and retired cherry farmers.

As the temperature that Sunday rose to 31 degrees Celsius, we were happy that the organisers had installed a temporary exhibition in one of the castle halls. It was amazing to see so many cherry varieties on display, from pale yellow to deep red and almost black. We also learned that the cherry stems, which we normally discard on the compost pile, have anti-inflammatory and other medicinal properties, when dried and used in tea.

The real highlight was the guided tour by Paul Van Laer, coordinator at the non-profit association the National Orchard Foundation (Nationale Boomgaardenstichting). On the sloping grounds of the castle, the association had planted several hectares of traditional varieties of cherry trees to conserve the genetic diversity as well as the knowledge to grow them. Already six years ago, we were so inspired by the work of the Foundation that we bought about 30 young trees of traditional apple, pear, plum and cherry varieties from them to plant at home in our pasture.

Standing on a typical ladder used to pick cherries, Paul passionately speaks to the visitors. With his life-long experience he can tell stories about every single variety. Encouraging citizens to plant traditional fruit tree varieties helps to ensure that the genetic diversity is conserved in as many different locations as possible. And it quickly dawns on us how important this strategy is.

Paul points to the field where tall-stemmed cherry trees were planted about 20 years ago. We are all shocked to see that most of the trees had died. ‚ÄúWhen you plant tall-stemmed varieties, you can normally harvest cherries for the next 70 years,‚ÄĚ Paul explains, ‚Äúbut with the disturbed climate that we are witnessing the past decade, many trees cannot survive. We used to have more than 80 cherry varieties, but we are really struggling to keep them alive.‚ÄĚ Heat stress, droughts, floods and new pests that have arrived with the changing climate (and without their natural enemies), such as the Asian fruit fly (Drosophilla suzukii), have made it so that current commercial farmers only grow cherries under highly controlled environments.

One of the visitors is curious to know whether, given the many challenges, it is still worthwhile to plant a cherry tree in your garden. ‚ÄúWhen you live away from commercial farm or orchards where lots of cherry trees are grown, there is less presence of the fruit fly. Also, if you only have a few fruit trees around your house, you can easily water them, if need be,‚ÄĚ says Paul. For the National Orchard Foundation, having people grow cherry trees back home may become increasingly important in the long run.

As cherry trees are affected by the disturbed climate, gardeners and smallholders who have space could plant a single tree. Not only it would contribute to conserve the genetic diversity, it will also give you some delicious cherries to put on your pie.

Related blogs

European deserts, coming soon

The juice mobile

Training trees

Ignoring signs from nature

When the bees hit a brick wall

A farm in the city

 

De kers op de taart

Het behoud van traditionele vari√ęteiten voor toekomstige generaties is de moeite waard, maar ook een uitdaging, vooral als het gaat om fruitbomen, zoals mijn vrouw Marcella en ik leerden tijdens een recent bezoek aan het kasteel van Alden Biezen, in Belgi√ę, waar voor het 20e jaar een speciaal “Kersen” evenement werd georganiseerd.

Op het binnenplein van het 16e-eeuwse kasteel, in de gemeente Bilzen in de provincie Limburg, Belgi√ę, hadden verschillende lokale organisaties informatiestands ingericht, waaronder √©√©n over bijenteelt, de sapmobiel en een stand over traditionele fruitsoorten.

Belgi√ę zou Belgi√ę niet zijn als er niet ook stands waren waar je kersenbier kon proeven en lokale lekkernijen, zoals dikke pannenkoeken gevuld met kersen. Informatieborden langs het pad boden interessante verhalen, getuigenissen en diepgaande kennis van overleden en gepensioneerde kersenboeren.

Omdat de temperatuur die zondag opliep tot 31 graden Celsius, waren we blij dat de organisatoren een tijdelijke tentoonstelling hadden ingericht in een van de kasteelzalen. Het was verbazingwekkend om zoveel kersensoorten te zien, van lichtgeel tot dieprood en bijna zwart. We leerden ook dat de kersenstengels, die we normaal gesproken op de composthoop gooien, ontstekingsremmende en andere geneeskrachtige eigenschappen hebben als ze gedroogd worden en in thee worden gebruikt.

Het echte hoogtepunt was de rondleiding door Paul Van Laer, co√∂rdinator van de Nationale Boomgaardenstichting. Op het glooiende terrein van het kasteel had de vereniging verschillende hectaren met traditionele vari√ęteiten van kersenbomen geplant om de genetische diversiteit en de kennis om ze te kweken te behouden. Al zes jaar geleden waren we zo ge√Įnspireerd door het werk van de Nationale Boomgaardenstichting dat we ongeveer 30 jonge bomen van traditionele appel-, peren-, pruimen- en kersenrassen van hen kochten om thuis in ons weiland te planten.

Staande op een typische ladder die gebruikt wordt om kersen te plukken, staat Paul de bezoekers hartstochtelijk te woord. Met zijn levenslange ervaring kan hij verhalen vertellen over elke vari√ęteit. Burgers aanmoedigen om traditionele fruitboomvari√ęteiten te planten helpt om de genetische diversiteit op zoveel mogelijk verschillende locaties te behouden. En het wordt ons al snel duidelijk hoe belangrijk deze strategie is.

Paul wijst naar het veld waar 20 jaar geleden hoogstam kersenbomen zijn geplant. We zijn allemaal geschokt als we zien dat de meeste bomen zijn doodgegaan. “Als je hoogstammige vari√ęteiten plant, kun je normaal gesproken de komende 70 jaar kersen oogsten,” legt Paul uit, “maar met het verstoorde klimaat van de afgelopen tien jaar kunnen veel bomen niet overleven. Vroeger hadden we meer dan 80 kersenvari√ęteiten, maar we hebben echt moeite om ze in leven te houden.” Hittestress, droogte, overstromingen en nieuwe plagen die met het veranderende klimaat zijn gekomen (en zonder hun natuurlijke vijanden), zoals de Aziatische fruitvlieg (Drosophilla suzukii), hebben ervoor gezorgd dat de huidige commerci√ęle boeren alleen kersen telen in zeer gecontroleerde omgevingen.

Een van de bezoekers is benieuwd of het, gezien de vele uitdagingen, nog steeds de moeite waard is om een kersenboom in je tuin te planten. “Als je niet in de buurt woont van commerci√ęle boerderijen of boomgaarden waar veel kersenbomen worden gekweekt, is er minder aanwezigheid van de fruitvlieg. Als je maar een paar fruitbomen rond je huis hebt, kun je ze ook gemakkelijk water geven als dat nodig is,” zegt Paul. Voor de Nationale Boomgaarden Stichting kan het op de lange termijn steeds belangrijker worden om mensen thuis kersenbomen te laten kweken.

Omdat kersenbomen worden be√Įnvloed door het verstoorde klimaat, zouden tuiniers en kleine boeren die ruimte hebben een enkele boom kunnen planten. Het zou niet alleen bijdragen aan het behoud van de genetische diversiteit, maar het zal je ook heerlijke kersen opleveren voor op je taart.

At home with agroforestry February 26th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

I’ve written about Serafín Vidal before, an agronomist who spends his free time developing an innovative agroforestry system at home. On week days, he works as an extensionist, teaching agroforestry to about 250 farmers around the three main valleys of Cochabamba, Bolivia. These farmers grow mixed orchards of apple and forest trees. The apples provide a crop to sell, and the forest trees provide organic matter and bring up nutrients from deep in the soil. As the trees shed their leaves, they form a mulch that fertilizes the apples and vegetable crops growing on the ground.

Previously, I had visited two of the farmers who Serafín teaches, and I sensed their enthusiasm, but recently, Paul, Marcella, Ana and I got a chance to visit Serafín at his own home, where he planted his first forest, about ten years ago.

Serafín lives in the small town of Arani, about an hour’s drive from Cochabamba. Arani has grown slowly since colonial times, and still has house lots with large garden plots near the central plaza. When Serafín took over one of these plots, there was 700 square meters of grass behind the house. The lifeless soil was crusted with salt.

Working on the weekends, Seraf√≠n tore out the lawn and planted trees, including peaches, figs, plums, prickly pear cactus, apples, avocados, roses, dahlias, gladioli, date palms and native molles, chacatea, trumpetbush, jacaranda, ash, poplar, lloq‚Äôe, and qhewi√Īa. He now has about 100 species of herbs, vegetables, fruit trees and climbing vines, including the tastiest grapes I‚Äôve ever eaten. Seraf√≠n leaves logs and leaf litter on the surface of the earth, as in a natural forest, to decay slowly and fertilize the soil, while providing a habitat for earthworms and other beneficial creatures.

When Serafín establishes an agroforest, in the early years he adds a bit of organic matter on top of the soil. But with time, the trees fertilize the earth on their own, just as in a wild forest, where the soil is dark, and naturally fragrant.

Seraf√≠n scooped up a handful of soil, to show us how it was full of life: earthworms, sow bugs, and larvae of wood-eating beetles. Seraf√≠n explained: ‚ÄúThese larvae have bacteria and fungi in their digestive tract. This is mixed with the dead wood that they eat, enriching the soil.‚ÄĚ

Serafín explains that one of the key principles of agroforestry is to imitate the local forest. This diversity keeps plant healthy. In his planted forest, there are no plant diseases, and no weeds, only self-seeding plants that he keeps. The only pests are birds, attracted to the ripe fruit. Serafín keeps them out with nets. He controls the persistent fruit fly with traps and natural remedies he makes himself (sulphur-lime, caldo de ceniza and fosfito, which we have described in an earlier blog).

Unlike many extensionists, Serafín practices what he teaches. He works out his ideas at home, on his own land, before sharing the principles with farmers, strategically located around the three large valleys of Cochabamba.

Each of these farmers adopts the basic principles of agroforestry, and then becomes an example in their own community. This is important in a system that includes trees, which take years to mature.

Seraf√≠n maintains that agroforestry is less work than other farming styles. ‚ÄúIf we make farming easy, maybe more people will want to be farmers,‚ÄĚ he says.

The 4 principles of agroforestry

  1. Do not disturb the earth. Do not plow it. Plant by making a small hole in the earth with a sharp stick.
  2. Keep the soil permanently covered. E.g. with fallen leaves, branches, logs and living plants.
  3. Imitate the local forest. Combine many plant species of different sizes and different live cycles.
  4. In an agroforestry system, the species live together. They do not compete for nutrients or for light.

Previous Agro-Insight blog stories

Experiments with trees

Apple futures

Friendly germs

Watch the video

Seeing the life in the soil

Acknowledgements

Agronomist Serafín Vidal works for the Fundación Agrecol Andes. He directs the Agroforestería Dinámica project, sponsored by NATUREFUND. Serafín read and commented on a previous version of this blog.

Scientific names of native species

Molle Schinus molle

Chacatea Dodonaea viscosa

Trumpetbush (lluvia de oro) Tecoma sp.

Jacaranda Jacaranda mimosifolia

Ash (fresno) Fraxinus sp.

Poplar (aliso) Populus sp.

Lloq’e Kageneckia lanceolata

Qhewi√Īa Polylepis spp.

EN CASA CON LA AGROFORESTER√ćA

26 de febrero del 2023, por Jeff Bentley

Ya he escrito antes sobre Seraf√≠n Vidal, un ingeniero agr√≥nomo que dedica su tiempo libre a desarrollar un innovador sistema agroforestal en casa. Los d√≠as h√°biles, √©l trabaja como asistente t√©cnico, ense√Īando agroforester√≠a din√°mica a unos 250 agricultores de los tres valles principales de Cochabamba, Bolivia. Estos agricultores cultivan huertos combinados de manzanos y √°rboles forestales. Los manzanos proporcionan una cosecha que vender, y los √°rboles forestales aportan materia org√°nica y nutrientes desde las profundidades del suelo. Cuando los √°rboles se desprenden de sus hojas, forman un mulch que fertiliza los manzanos y las hortalizas sembrados en el suelo.

Anteriormente, yo hab√≠a visitado a dos de los agricultores que Seraf√≠n ense√Īa, y percib√≠ su entusiasmo, pero hace poco, Paul, Marcella, Ana y yo tuvimos la oportunidad de visitar a Seraf√≠n en su propia casa, donde plant√≥ su primer bosque, hace unos diez a√Īos.

Serafín vive en el pueblo de Arani, a una hora en coche de Cochabamba. Arani ha crecido lentamente desde la época colonial, y todavía tiene parcelas de casas con grandes huertos cerca de la plaza central. Cuando Serafín se hizo cargo de una de estas parcelas, había 700 metros cuadrados de grama detrás de la casa. La tierra, sin vida, tenía afloramientos de sal.

Trabajando los fines de semana, Seraf√≠n arranc√≥ el c√©sped y plant√≥ √°rboles, entre ellos durazneros, higos, ciruelos, tunas, manzanos, paltos, rosas, dalias, gladiolos, palma d√°til y los nativos molles, chacatea, lluvia de oro, jacaranda, fresno, aliso, lloq‚Äôe, y qhewi√Īa. Ahora tiene unas 100 especies de hierbas, verduras, √°rboles frutales y vides trepadoras, incluidas las uvas m√°s sabrosas que jam√°s he comido. Seraf√≠n deja troncos y hojarascas en la superficie de la tierra, como en un bosque natural, para que se descompongan lentamente y fertilicen el suelo, al tiempo que dan un h√°bitat para las lombrices de tierra y otras criaturas beneficiosas.

Cuando Seraf√≠n establece un sistema agroforestal, en los primeros a√Īos a√Īade un poco de materia org√°nica sobre el suelo. Pero con el tiempo, los √°rboles fertilizan la tierra por s√≠ solos, como en un bosque silvestre, donde el suelo es oscuro y tiene un rico olor de forma natural.

Seraf√≠n recogi√≥ un pu√Īado de tierra para mostrarnos que estaba llena de vida: lombrices, chanchitos y larvas de escarabajos comedores de madera. Seraf√≠n nos lo explic√≥: “Estas larvas tienen bacterias y hongos en su tracto digestivo. Esto se mezcla con la madera muerta que comen, enriqueciendo el suelo”.

Seraf√≠n explica que uno de los principios clave de la agroforester√≠a es imitar el bosque local. Esta diversidad mantiene sanas las plantas. En su bosque plantado no hay enfermedades de las plantas, ni malezas, s√≥lo plantas que se auto-siembran y que √©l valora. Las √ļnicas dificultades son los p√°jaros, atra√≠dos por la fruta madura. Seraf√≠n los mantiene alejados con redes. Controla la persistente mosca de la fruta con trampas y remedios naturales que √©l mismo fabrica (sulfoc√°lcico, caldo de ceniza, biol y fosfito, que ya hemos descrito en un blog anterior).

A diferencia de muchos t√©cnicos, Seraf√≠n practica lo que ense√Īa. Da vida a sus ideas en casa, en su propia tierra, antes de compartir los principios con los agricultores, ubicados estrat√©gicamente alrededor de los tres grandes valles de Cochabamba (el Valle Alto, el Valle Bajo, y el Valle de Sacaba).

Cada uno de estos agricultores adopta los principios b√°sicos de la agroforester√≠a, y luego se convierte en un ejemplo en su propia comunidad. Esto es importante en un sistema que incluye √°rboles, que tardan a√Īos en madurar.

Seraf√≠n sostiene que la agroforester√≠a da menos trabajo que otros estilos de cultivo. “Si hacemos que la agricultura sea f√°cil, quiz√° m√°s gente quiera ser agricultor”, afirma.

Los 4 principios de la agroforestería

  1. No mover el suelo. No ararlo. Sembrar haciendo un peque√Īo agujero en la tierra con un palo puntiagudo.
  2. Tener cobertura permanente sobre el suelo. Por ejemplo, con hojas caídas, ramas, troncos y plantas vivas.
  3. Imitar el bosque del lugar. Combinar muchas especies de plantas de diferentes tama√Īos y diferentes ciclos de vida.
  4. En el sistema agroforestal, hay convivencia entre todas las especies. No hay competencia por nutrientes ni luz.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Experimentos con √°rboles

Manzanos del futuro

Microbios amigables

Mirar el video

Ver la vida en el suelo

Agradecimientos

El ingeniero Serafín Vidal trabaja para la Fundación Agrecol Andes. Conduce el proyecto de Agroforestería Dinámica, financiada por NATUREFUND. Serafín leyó e hizo comentarios sobre una versión previa de este blog.

Nombres científicos de especies nativas

Molle Schinus molle

Chacatea Dodonaea viscosa

Lluvia de oro Tecoma sp.

Jacaranda Jacaranda mimosifolia

Fresno Fraxinus sp.

Aliso Populus sp.

Lloq’e Kageneckia lanceolata

Qhewi√Īa Polylepis spp.

 

 

Recovering from the quinoa boom October 30th, 2022 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

In southwestern Bolivia, a whole ecosystem has been nearly destroyed, to export quinoa, but some people are trying to save it.

Bolivia’s southern Altiplano is a harsh place to live. Although it is in the tropical latitudes it is so high, over 3800 meters, that it often freezes. Its climax forest, the t’ular, is only a meter tall, made up of native shrubs, grasses and cactuses.

For centuries on the southern Altiplano, farmers grew quinoa, an annual plant with edible seeds, in the shelter of little hills. No other crop would grow in this high country. People herded llamas on the more exposed plains of the Altiplano. The farmers would take quinoa in packs, carried by llamas, to other parts of Bolivia to trade for maize, fruit and chu√Īo (traditional freeze-dried potatoes) as well as wool, salt and jerky.

In about 2010 quinoa became a fad food, and export prices soared. Bolivian plant breeder, Alejandro Bonifacio, who is from the Altiplano, estimates that 80% of the t’ular was plowed under to grow quinoa from 2010 to 2014.This was the first time that farmers cleared the dwarf forest growing on the open plains.

After the brief quinoa boom ended, in some places, only 30% of the lands cleared on the t’ular were still being farmed. The rest had simply been turned into large patches of white sand. The native plants did not grow back, probably because of drought and wind linked to climate change.

At the start of the quinoa boom, Dr. Bonifacio and colleagues at Proinpa, a research agency, realized the severity of the destruction of the native ecosystem, and began to develop a system of regenerative agriculture.

In an early experience, they gathered 20 gunny bags of the seed heads of different species of t’ulas, the native shrubs and grasses. They scattered the seeds onto the sandy soil of abandoned fields. Out of several million seeds, only a dozen germinated and only four survived. After their first unsuccessful experience with direct seeding, the researchers and their students learned to grow seeds of native plants in two nurseries on the Altiplano, and then transplant them.

So much native vegetation has been lost that it cannot all be reforested, so researchers worked with farmers in local communities to experiment with live barriers. These were two or three lines of t’ula transplanted from the nurseries to create living barriers three meters wide. The live barriers could be planted as borders around the fields, or as strips within the large ones, spaced 30 to 45 meters apart. This helped to slow down soil erosion caused by wind, so farmers could grow quinoa (still planted, but in smaller quantities, to eat at home and for the national market, after the end of the export boom). Growing native shrubs as live barriers also gave farmers an incentive to care for these native plants.

By 2022, nearly 8000 meters of live barriers of t’ula have been planted, and are being protected by local farmers. The older plants are maturing, thriving and bearing seed. Some local governments and residents have started to drive to Proinpa, to request seedlings to plant, hinting at a renewed interest in these native plants.

The next step in creating a new regenerative agriculture was to introduce a rotation crop into the quinoa system. But on the southern Altiplano, no other crop has been grown, besides quinoa (and a semi-wild relative, qa√Īawa). In this climate, it was impossible even to grow potatoes and other native roots and tubers.

NGOs suggested that farmers rotate quinoa with a legume crop, like peas or broad beans, but these plants died every time.

Bonifacio and colleagues realized that a new legume crop would be required, but that it would have to be a wild, native plant. They began experimenting with native lupines. The domesticated lupine, a legume, produces seeds in pods which remain closed even after the plant matures. When ancient farmers domesticated the lupine, they selected for pods that stayed closed, so the grains would not be lost in the field. But the pods of wild legumes shatter, scattering their seeds on the ground.

Various methods were tried to recover the wild lupine seed, including sifting it out of the sand. Researchers eventually learned that the seed was viable before it was completely dry, before the pod burst. After the seed dried, it went into a four-year dormancy.

In early trials with farmers, the wild lupines have done well as a quinoa intercrop. Llamas will eat them, and the legumes improve the soil. When the quinoa is harvested in March, April and May, the lupine remains as a cover crop, reaching maturity the following year, and protecting the soil.

The quinoa boom was a tragedy. A unique ecosystem was nearly wiped out in four years. The market can provide perverse incentives to destroy a landscape. The research with native windbreaks and cover crops is also accompanied by studies of local cactus and by breeding varieties of quinoa that are well-adapted to the southern Altiplano. This promises to be the basis of a regenerative agriculture, one that respects the local plants, including the animals that eat them, such as the domesticated llama and the wild vicu√Īa, while also providing a livelihood for native people.

Further reading

Bonifacio, Alejandro, Genaro Aroni, Milton Villca & Jeffery W. Bentley 2022 Recovering from quinoa: regenerative agricultural research in Bolivia. Journal of Crop Improvement, DOI: 10.1080/15427528.2022.2135155

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

Awakening the seeds

Wind erosion and the great quinoa disaster

Slow recovery

Related videos

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

The wasp that protects our crops

Acknowledgements

Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio works for the Proinpa Foundation. This work was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation.

RECUPER√ĀNDOSE DEL BOOM DE LA QUINUA

Por Jeff Bentley, 30 de octubre del 2022

En el suroeste de Bolivia, todo un ecosistema casi se ha destruido para exportar quinua, pero algunas personas intentan salvarlo.

Es dif√≠cil vivir en el Altiplano sur de Bolivia. Aunque est√° en latitudes tropicales, est√° tan alto, a m√°s de 3.800 metros, que a menudo se congela. Su bosque cl√≠max, el t’ular, s√≥lo tiene un metro de altura, formado por arbustos, hierbas y cactus nativos.

Durante siglos, en el Altiplano sur, los agricultores cultivaron quinua (una planta de ciclo anual y tallo herb√°ceo) con semillas comestibles, al abrigo de las peque√Īas colinas. Ning√ļn otro cultivo crec√≠a en esta zona alta. En las llanuras m√°s expuestas del Altiplano, la gente arreaba llamas. Los campesinos llevaban la quinua cargados por las llamas, a otras partes de Bolivia para intercambiarla por ma√≠z, frutas, chu√Īo, lana, sal, y charqui.

Hacia 2010, la quinua se convirti√≥ en un alimento de moda y los precios de exportaci√≥n se dispararon. El fitomejorador boliviano Alejandro Bonifacio, originario del Altiplano, calcula que entre 2010 y 2014 se ar√≥ el 80% del t’ular para cultivar quinua.

Tras el breve auge de la quinua, en algunas zonas solo el 30% de las tierras desmontadas en el t’ular segu√≠an siendo cultivadas. El resto simplemente se hab√≠a convertido en grandes manchas de arena blanca. Las plantas nativas no volvieron a crecer, probablemente por la sequ√≠a y el viento atribuible al cambio clim√°tico).

Al comienzo del boom de la quinua, el Dr. Bonifacio y sus colegas de Proinpa, una agencia de investigación, se dieron cuenta de la gravedad de la destrucción del ecosistema nativo, y comenzaron a desarrollar un sistema de agricultura regenerativa.

En una de las primeras experiencias, reunieron 20 gangochos conteniendo frutos con las diminutas semillas de diferentes especies de t’ulas, los arbustos nativos y pastos. Esparcieron las semillas en el arenoso suelo de los campos abandonados. De varios millones de semillas, s√≥lo germinaron una decena que al final quedaron cuatro plantas sobrevivientes. Tras su primera experiencia frustrante con la siembra directa, los investigadores y sus estudiantes aprendieron a cultivar semillas de plantas nativas en dos viveros del Altiplano con fines de trasplantarlos.

Se ha perdido tanta vegetaci√≥n nativa que no se puede reforestarla toda, as√≠ que los investigadores trabajaron con los agricultores de las comunidades locales para experimentar con barreras vivas. Se trataba de dos o tres l√≠neas de t’ula trasplantadas desde los viveros para crear barreras vivas de tres metros de ancho. Las barreras vivas pod√≠an plantarse como bordes alrededor de las parcelas, o como franjas dentro de los campos grandes, con una separaci√≥n de 30 a 45 metros. Esto ayud√≥ a frenar la erosi√≥n del suelo causada por el viento, para que los agricultores pudieran cultivar quinua (que a√ļn se siembra, pero en menor cantidad, para comer en casa y para el mercado nacional, tras el fin del boom de las exportaciones). El cultivo de arbustos nativos como barreras vivas tambi√©n incentiv√≥ a los agricultores a cuidar estas plantas nativas.

En 2022, se han plantado casi 8.000 metros de barreras vivas de t’ula, que se protegen por los agricultores locales. Las plantas m√°s antiguas est√°n madurando, prosperando y formando semilla. Algunos residentes y gobiernos locales han comenzado a llegar a Proinpa, para pedir plantines para plantar, lo que indica un renovado inter√©s en estas plantas nativas.

El siguiente paso en la creaci√≥n de una nueva agricultura regenerativa era introducir un cultivo de rotaci√≥n en el sistema de la quinua. Pero en el Altiplano sur no se ha cultivado ning√ļn otro cultivo, aparte de la quinua (y un pariente semi-silvestre, la qa√Īawa). En este clima, era imposible incluso cultivar papas y otras ra√≠ces y tub√©rculos nativos.

Las ONGs sugirieron a los agricultores que rotaran la quinoa con un cultivo de leguminosas, como arvejas o habas, pero estas plantas morían siempre.

Bonifacio y sus colegas se dieron cuenta de que sería necesario tener un nuevo cultivo de leguminosas, pero que tendría que ser una planta silvestre y nativa. Empezaron a experimentar con lupinos nativos. El lupino domesticado es el tarwi, una leguminosa, produce semillas en vainas que permanecen cerradas incluso después de que la planta madure. Cuando los antiguos agricultores domesticaron el lupino, seleccionaron las vainas que permanecían cerradas, para que los granos no se perdieran en el campo. Pero las vainas de las leguminosas silvestres se rompen, esparciendo sus semillas por el suelo.

Se intentaron varios m√©todos para recuperar la semilla de lupinos silvestre, incluido tamizando la arena. Los investigadores descubrieron que la semilla era viable antes de estar completamente seca, antes de que la vaina reventara. Una vez seca, la semilla entraba en un periodo de dormancia de cuatro a√Īos.

En los primeros ensayos con agricultores, los lupinos silvestres han funcionado bien como cultivo intermedio de la quinoa. Las llamas los comen y las leguminosas mejoran el suelo. Cuando se cosecha la quinoa en marzo, abril y mayo, el lupino permanece como cultivo de cobertura, alcanzando la madurez al a√Īo siguiente y protegiendo el suelo.

El boom de la quinoa fue una tragedia. Un ecosistema √ļnico estuvo a punto de desaparecer en cuatro a√Īos. El mercado puede ofrecer incentivos perversos para destruir un paisaje. La investigaci√≥n con barreras vivas nativas y cultivos de cobertura tambi√©n va acompa√Īada de estudios de cactus locales y del fitomejoramiento de variedades de quinua bien adaptadas al Altiplano sur. Esto promete ser la base de una agricultura regenerativa, que respete las plantas locales, incluidos los animales que se alimentan de ellas, como la llama domesticada y la vicu√Īa silvestre, y al mismo tiempo proporcionando un medio de vida a la gente nativa.

Lectura adicional

Bonifacio, Alejandro, Genaro Aroni, Milton Villca & Jeffery W. Bentley 2022 Recovering from quinoa: regenerative agricultural research in Bolivia. Journal of Crop Improvement, DOI: 10.1080/15427528.2022.2135155

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Despertando las semillas

Destruyendo el altiplano sur con quinua

Recuperación lenta

Videos sobre el tema

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

La avispa que protege nuestros cultivos

Agradecimiento

El Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio trabaja para la Fundación Proinpa. Este trabajo se hizo con el generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

Good fences make good neighbors March 6th, 2022 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Unbounded by fences, neighbors may occasionally take a furrow from your field when they plow their own. Farmers around the world make fences from stone, barbed-wire, or earth bunds. They may stack up split rails. Some in Central America plant living fences: a line of trees connected with barbed wire. Everywhere, fences tend to be made from abundant materials.

In the Ecuadorian Andes, in the province of Cotopaxi, I was intrigued recently to see field borders marked largely by agave, a large, thorny, succulent plant. Agave grows well here, and withstands the yearly dry season. If planted in a line, agave will grow into a tight barrier. The leaves have sharp thorns along the sides and nasty one on the tip, keeping out livestock. As farmer Mercedes J√°come explained, the agave marks the field boundary. It lets the neighbors know where their field stops and yours begins.

The agave also has several uses. You can chop up the juicy leaves as fodder for cows. When the agave is mature, at 12 or 15 years, you can make a hole in the crown of the plant to collect the sap that flows into the cavity. This liquid is called chawar mishki, a sweet, lightly alcoholic drink You can drink it fresh or cook it with rice, barley or wheat. Before plastic rope was invented, the agave fibers were made into twine. This use is reflected in one of the local names for agave, cabuya (‚Äútwine‚ÄĚ).

Farmers also leave wild cherry trees (capulí) when they sprout in the line of agaves. The agave leaves protect the seedlings of volunteer trees and shrubs. While the profuse blossoms of the capulí tree attract lots of pollinators, its small, dark red fruits are welcome in February, near the start of the rainy season.

Wild flowers also grow between the agaves and the cherries, providing habitat for beneficial insects, like wasps and many kinds of flies that prey on insect pests. Agronomists Diego Mina and Mayra Coro are working with farmers to preserve the field borders, and also to experiment with them. Innovative beekeeper José Santamaría is planting malva on some of his borders because it flowers early, providing food for his bees. He also uses the leaves to feed his rabbits and guinea pigs

Occasionally fences can lead to conflicts. Lucrecia Sivinta explained that her field neighbor lives in Quito, the capital of Ecuador. The neighbor has invested in large greenhouses, using chemicals to grow flowers for export. One day, do√Īa Lucrecia was horrified to find that her neighbor had thoughtlessly sprayed herbicides on the field border, damaging the agaves and killing all of the wild flowers, leaving a dead, ugly yellow mess. Lucrecia said she would talk to the neighbor, who should have known better than to spray their common border.

A field border is not quite private, and not collective, either. It is shared by two land owners, linking them as well as dividing their land. Fences can make good neighbors, if they communicate and manage their field edges together, negotiating a common space that they share.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

To fence or not to fence

Puppy love

A positive validation

Mending fences, making friends

Related videos

The wasp that protects our crops

Turning honey into money

Scientific names

Agave: Agave americana

Capulí (wild cherry, or Andean cherry): Prunus serótina

Malva: Lavatera sp.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Diego Mina and Mayra Coro for introducing us the farmers in Cotopaxi, and for sharing their knowledge with us. Thanks also to Mayra and Diego for their valuable comments on a previous version of this blog. Diego and Mayra work for IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement). Our work was funded by the McKnight Foundation’s Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP).

BUENOS CERCOS HACEN BUENOS VECINOS

Por Jeff Bentley, 6 de marzo del 2022

Sin cercos, un agricultor puede perder un surco cada vez que los vecinos aran el campo al lado. Los agricultores en todo el mundo construyen cercos de piedra, de alambre de p√ļa, o de tierra. Algunos apilan listones partidos. En Centroam√©rica, algunos plantan cercos vivos: una l√≠nea de √°rboles conectados con alambre de p√ļa. En cada lugar, suelen hacer cercos de materiales abundantes.

En los Andes ecuatorianos, en la provincia de Cotopaxi, me intrigó hace poco ver los límites de los campos marcados en gran parte por el agave, una planta grande, espinosa y suculenta. El agave crece bien y resiste la época seca. Si se planta en línea, las plantas de agave forman una barrera cerrada. Hay espinas filudas en los bordes de las hojas, y otra en la punta, que alejan al ganado. Como explica la agricultora Mercedes Jácome, el agave marca el límite del campo. Permite a que los vecinos conozcan los límites de su campo.

El agave tambi√©n tiene varios usos. Se pueden cortar las suculentas hojas como forraje para las vacas. Cuando el agave est√° maduro, a sus 12 o15 a√Īos, se puede hacer un agujero en el cogollo para extraer la savia. Este l√≠quido es conocido como chawar mishki, una bebida dulce y ligeramente alcoh√≥lica. Se puede tomarlo fresco, directamente de la planta, o cocinarlo con arroz, cebada o trigo. Antes de que se inventara la cuerda de pl√°stico, las fibras de agave se convert√≠an en cabuya. Por eso, dos de los nombres locales del agave todav√≠a son ‚Äúcabuya‚ÄĚ o ‚Äúcabuyo‚ÄĚ.

Los agricultores de este lugar tambi√©n dejan crecer a los cerezos andinos, el capul√≠, cuando brotan junto a los agaves. Las hojas de los agaves protegen las pl√°ntulas de los √°rboles y arbustos voluntarios. Mientras que las profusas flores del capul√≠ atraen a muchos polinizadores, sus peque√Īos frutos de rojo oscuro son apetecidos en febrero, cerca del inicio de la √©poca de lluvias.

Las flores silvestres tambi√©n crecen entre los agaves y los cerezos andinos, creando un h√°bitat para los insectos √ļtiles, como las avispas y muchos tipos de moscas que comen los insectos plagas. Los ingenieros Diego Mina y Mayra Coro trabajan con los agricultores para cuidar los bordes de los campos, y tambi√©n para experimentar con ellos. El innovador apicultor Jos√© Santamar√≠a est√° plantando malva en algunos de sus linderos porque florece pronto para alimentar a sus abejas. La malva tambi√©n produce abundante follaje que le sirve para alimentar sus animales, especialmente cuyes y conejos.

A veces, los cercos pueden dar lugar a conflictos. Lucrecia Sivinta explica que su vecino tiene un terreno junto al suyo. El vecino vive en Quito, la capital de Ecuador. Ha invertido en grandes invernaderos y usa agro-qu√≠micos para cultivar flores para la exportaci√≥n. Un d√≠a, do√Īa Lucrecia se horroriz√≥ al descubrir que su vecino hab√≠a fumigado herbicidas en el l√≠mite del campo, da√Īando los agaves y matando todas las flores silvestres, dejando una fea mancha amarilla y muerta. Lucrecia dijo que hablar√≠a con el vecino, porque √©l no ten√≠a que fumigar el borde entre sus campos.

Un límite o cerco de campo no es del todo privado, ni tampoco colectivo. Es compartido por dos o más propietarios. El límite los une, pero a la vez los divide. Los cercos pueden hacer buenos vecinos, si se comunican y juntos manejan el espacio que comparten.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

To fence or not to fence

Puppy love

Mending fences, making friends

Videos relacionados

La avispa que protege nuestros cultivos

La miel es oro

Nombres científicos

Agave, o cabuya, cabuyo o penca: Agave americana

Capulí: Prunus serótina

Malva: Lavatera sp.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Diego Mina y Mayra Coro por presentarnos a la gente de Cotopaxi, y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros. Gracias a Mayra y Diego por sus valiosos comentarios sobre una versión previa de este blog. Diego y Mayra trabajan para IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement). Nuestro trabajo fue financiado por Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

Design by Olean webdesign