WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

In the spirit of wine March 31st, 2024 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n ¬†

While working at a vineyard in Spain, Enrique Carvajal thought of starting his own winery back home in Bolivia. Enrique was from the small town of Cliza, in Cochabamba, but he had spent most of his career working abroad, at different jobs from the USA to Tel Aviv. He would go out for a year or two, and send money home to his wife and family.

Enrique’s parents had always grown grapes in Bolivia, so he had long known how to make a rustic wine, but the Spanish vineyard was unusual. It was associated with priests, and set up to make sacramental wine, some of which they sent to priests in other countries, which did not make their own wine. The experience gave him the idea that wine could be kind of a big deal.

In 2015, in his fifties, and back in Bolivia, don Enrique collected varieties, like white muscatel, shiraz, merlot and others. By 2021, he produced over 2000 liters. Over the years, Enrique has observed which vines produce a fine wine at his farm‚Äôs altitude, 2,800 meters, making it among the highest vineyards in the world. Enrique has also created a label, and given his vineyard a name, Medall√≥n. Having a name was a marketing idea that Enrique learned in Spain, but the name ‚ÄúMedall√≥n‚ÄĚ comes from the different medals that his family‚Äôs peaches and apples have won in local fairs.

Don Enrique also innovates by cooperating with Cliza’s municipal government, which releases sterile fruit flies in the valley every Wednesday. Medallón is one of their release sites.

Don Enrique is proud that his family’s wine is natural. He doesn’t add any chemicals to it, he explains.

He shows my wife Ana and I, and some fellow visitors, a sample of his neat bottles, with red, white and rosé vintages. The newest ones sell for a modest 25 Bolivianos (just over 3 dollars), while the 11-year-old wines sell for 100 Bolivianos.

‚ÄúI‚Äôm setting aside some wine every year, for my children and grandchildren to keep as long as possible,‚ÄĚ don Enrique explains. This aged wine and a family business will be part of don Enrique‚Äôs legacy.

Enrique‚Äôs years in Spain gave him a vision of a different future, while his stay in Tel Aviv gave him an appreciation of the past. ‚ÄúWhen I lived in Tel Aviv, I was able to travel all over the Holy land,‚ÄĚ don Enrique explains, adding sadly, ‚ÄúTo the places where they are fighting now.‚ÄĚ

‚ÄúI visited Bethlehem and Jerusalem and Canaan, where Jesus performed his first miracle of turning water into wine.‚ÄĚ He adds, ‚ÄúWine is sacred.‚ÄĚ

Enrique combined his grape-growing skills, learned at home, with some Spanish ideas for marketing an upscale product, and then experimented on his own with different grape varieties at high altitudes. Intangibles, like caring for the environment, wanting to leave something for the family, and finding a spiritual connection with one’s produce, all add meaning to his work.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Enrique Carvajal, Ana Gonz√°les, and Paul Van Mele for commenting on previous versions of this story.

EN EL ESP√ćRITU DEL VINO

Por Jeff Bentley

31 de marzo del 2024

Mientras trabajaba en un vi√Īedo en Espa√Īa, Enrique Carvajal pens√≥ en montar su propia bodega en Bolivia. Enrique era de la peque√Īa ciudad de Cliza, en Cochabamba, pero hab√≠a pasado la mayor parte de su carrera trabajando en el extranjero, en distintos empleos desde los Estados Unidos a Tel Aviv. Se iba por uno o dos a√Īos y enviaba dinero a su mujer y a su familia.

Los padres de Enrique siempre hab√≠an cultivado la vid en Bolivia, as√≠ que √©l sab√≠a desde hac√≠a tiempo c√≥mo hacer un vino r√ļstico, pero el vi√Īedo espa√Īol era distinto. Estaba asociada a unos curas quienes elaboraban vino sacramental, parte del cual enviaban a sacerdotes de otros pa√≠ses, donde no se elaboraba su propio vino. La experiencia le dio la idea de que el vino pod√≠a ser algo importante.

En 2015, ya cincuent√≥n y de vuelta en Bolivia, don Enrique recolect√≥ variedades, como moscatel blanco, shiraz, merlot y otras. Para 2021, sol√≠a producir m√°s de 2000 litros por a√Īo. A lo largo de los a√Īos, Enrique ha observado qu√© cepas producen un buen vino a la altitud de su finca, 2.800 metros, lo que la sit√ļa entre los vi√Īedos m√°s altos del mundo. Enrique tambi√©n ha creado una etiqueta y ha dado nombre a su vi√Īedo, Medall√≥n. Tener un nombre fue una idea de marketing que Enrique aprendi√≥ en Espa√Īa, pero el nombre “Medall√≥n” viene de las diferentes medallas para los duraznos y manzanas que su familia ha ganado en ferias locales.

Don Enrique también innova colaborando con la alcaldía de Cliza, que libera moscas de la fruta estériles en el valle todos los miércoles. Medallón es uno de sus lugares de liberación.

Don Enrique est√° orgulloso de que el vino de su familia sea natural. No le a√Īade ning√ļn producto qu√≠mico, √©l explica.

Nos ense√Īa a mi mujer Ana y a m√≠, y a otros visitantes, una muestra de sus elegantes botellas, con vinos tintos, blancos y rosados. Las m√°s nuevas se venden a s√≥lo 25 bolivianos (poco m√°s de 3 d√≥lares), mientras que las de 11 a√Īos cuestan 100 bolivianos.

“Cada a√Īo reservo algunas botellas de vino para que mis hijos y nietos las conserven lo m√°s que puedan, explica don Enrique. Este vino a√Īejo y un negocio familiar formar√°n parte del legado de don Enrique.

Los a√Īos que Enrique pas√≥ en Espa√Īa le dieron una visi√≥n nueva del, mientras que su estancia en Tel Aviv le hizo apreciar el pasado. “Cuando viv√≠a en Tel Aviv, pude viajar por toda la Tierra Santa”, explica don Enrique, y a√Īade con tristeza: “A los lugares donde ahora est√°n peleando”.

“Visit√© Bel√©n y Jerusal√©n y Cana√°n, donde Jes√ļs hizo su primer milagro de convertir el agua en vino”. Y a√Īade: “El vino es sagrado”.

Don Enrique combin√≥ sus conocimientos sobre el cultivo de la vid, aprendidos en casa, con algunas ideas espa√Īolas para comercializar un producto de alta gama, y luego experiment√≥ por su cuenta con distintas variedades de uva a gran altitud. Los intangibles, como el cuidado del medio ambiente, el deseo de dejar algo a la familia y la b√ļsqueda de una conexi√≥n espiritual con los propios productos, a√Īaden significado a su trabajo.

Agradecimiento

Agradezco a Enrique Carvajal, Ana Gonz√°lez y Paul Van Mele por leer y comentar sobre versiones previas de este relato.

A ‚Äúslow food‚ÄĚ farm school December 10th, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Almario Senoro and his wife, Frances Mae, warmly welcome us as we arrive at Senoro Green Farm. One of the local partners that we are training on Negros Island in the Philippines is making a video on farm record keeping, and it turns out this farm family has just the right experiences to share.

Located on the outskirts of Bago City, since 2014 the family has been developing their three-hectare land into a fully integrated agroecological farm. Almario proudly shows us a map of the farm, which reveals that the farm design has been given some clear thought.

Organic rice is grown on two hectares and milled on the farm to ensure full compliance for organic certification. While Almario guides us around the house, we notice how pleasant the environment is; you hardly feel the heat of the sun as shade is provided by a wide variety of tropical fruit and coconut palm trees scattered around the garden.

In a small screen house, we meet Joyse Salcedo busy transplanting seedlings of various types of herbs and ornamentals. Joyse is from the neighbourhood and manages a team of five women who all work on the farm, wearing the same Senoro Green Farm t-shirts. On a whiteboard, Joyse accurately keeps track of all activities, so our trainees decide to interview her for their video.

‚ÄúFor us to know, for example, when did I sow, when can I transplant, when can I harvest, we need records in our everyday work,‚ÄĚ Joyse says. By doing so, they can properly plan and know when different crops will be ready to sell at the market.

The farm has a contract with a local Italian restaurant to weekly provide 10 kilograms of sweet basil, for which it charges 400-500 Philippine pesos per kilogram (7-8 Euros). The restaurant uses the fresh, organic basil leaves to make into a delicious pesto. Thai basil leaves are provided on a weekly basis to a Thai restaurant.

‚ÄúHerbs like basil are really great, as you need to plant them only once and you can then harvest leaves for six months, if you know how to manage the crop properly,‚ÄĚ confides Frances. ‚ÄúWe also sell locally crafted baskets with seedlings of five different herbs for anyone who wants to start their own small herb garden.‚ÄĚ

The farm has chickens, ducks, and a fish pond. The bran from the rice mill is used as feed. The poultry droppings are collected to feed worms that produce vermicompost, which helps to keep the soil in the vegetable plots healthy and fertile. Full recycling of farm resources is at the heart of the farm, requiring creativity in planning and the occasional adjustments.

While keeping records is useful for any farmer, it is a must for organic farmers, as Almario explains in front of the camera.

‚ÄúRecord keeping is needed for organic farming to track our crops: where they came from, how they were grown, what inputs we used. It is essential when we apply for certification from a third party or PGS, participatory guarantee system, to organically certify our products.‚ÄĚ

We are surprised to learn that Almario is a chemical engineer. Not really the type of profile one expects for an organic farmer.

For years, Almario and his wife lived and worked in the capital city, Manila. ‚ÄúIt was such a stressful work and life that it even affected my health. When I checked with my doctor all my results were borderline: high blood sugar and uric acid .‚Ķ The doctor prescribed medicines, but I didn‚Äôt like to take them because I knew they would affect my kidneys. I then changed my lifestyle 180 degrees because I love my health and want to stay longer in this world.‚ÄĚ

In one year, Almario learned about organic farming and then decided to set up his own farm. ‚ÄúSince then I have only eaten organic food. I became a healthy person. Lately, I had a health check-up and my health improved; thank God for that.‚ÄĚ

Now in their forties, Almario and Frances are not just entrepreneurial farmers, they have established various marketing outlets to sell fresh produce as well as jars of pickled papaya, chilli oil and refreshing juices made from the small calamansi fruits (Philippine lime), lightly flavoured with herbs, ginger, and turmeric.

The couple also turned Senoro Green Farm into a unique learning space for students interested in becoming ecological or certified organic farmers. They have just received approval from the local authorities to establish an official training centre to support young people who want to start an organic farm, as well as those who want to just learn about organic agriculture.

And it is not just about ecological farming. The farm also offers a wide range of ‚Äúfarm experience‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúslow food experience‚ÄĚ packages to groups or families for 200 to 600 Philippine pesos per person (3-10 Euros), as presented in their promotional leaflet.

You can help with transplanting herbs or vegetables, harvest dwarf coconuts, and enjoy drinking the refreshing coconut water. You can also learn how to prepare traditional dishes, using native utensils and a traditional clay pot. A three-course meal can be enjoyed in a bahay kubo, a traditional bamboo country house, with the food being presented on banana leaves as plates.

Clearly, Almario and Frances have succeeded in developing their farm with respect for the environment and traditional culture. And they have become an inspiration for others to become agri-preneurs. Sometimes a wakeup call is needed to let people discover their real passion.

 

Een ‚Äúslow food‚ÄĚ boerenschool

Almario Senoro en zijn vrouw Frances Mae verwelkomen ons hartelijk als we aankomen bij Senoro Green Farm. Een van de lokale partners die we trainen op Negros Island in de Filippijnen maakt een video over boekhouden van boerderijen en het blijkt dat deze boerenfamilie precies de juiste ervaringen heeft om te delen.

De familie ligt aan de rand van Bago City en is sinds 2014 bezig om hun land van drie hectare te ontwikkelen tot een volledig ge√Įntegreerde agro-ecologische boerderij. Almario laat ons trots een plattegrond van de boerderij zien, waarop duidelijk is dat er goed is nagedacht over het ontwerp van de boerderij.

Op twee hectare wordt biologische rijst verbouwd en op de boerderij gemalen om volledig te voldoen aan de eisen voor biologische certificering. Terwijl Almario ons rondleidt door het huis, valt het ons op hoe aangenaam de omgeving is; je voelt de hitte van de zon nauwelijks omdat er schaduw wordt geboden door een grote verscheidenheid aan tropische fruit- en kokospalmbomen die verspreid in de tuin staan.

In een kleine serre ontmoeten we Joyse Salcedo die bezig is met het verplanten van zaailingen van verschillende soorten kruiden en sierplanten. Joyse komt uit de buurt en geeft leiding aan een team van vijf vrouwen die allemaal op de boerderij werken, met dezelfde Senoro Green Farm t-shirts aan. Op een whiteboard houdt Joyse nauwkeurig alle activiteiten bij, dus besluiten onze trainees haar te interviewen voor hun video.

“Om bijvoorbeeld te weten wanneer ik gezaaid heb, wanneer ik kan uitplanten, wanneer ik kan oogsten, hebben we een administratie nodig voor ons dagelijkse werk,” zegt Joyse. Hierdoor kunnen ze goed plannen en weten ze wanneer de verschillende gewassen klaar zijn om op de markt verkocht te worden.

De boerderij heeft een contract met een plaatselijk Italiaans restaurant om wekelijks 10 kilo basilicum te leveren, waarvoor 400-500 Filipijnse pesos per kilo (7-8 euro) wordt gevraagd. Het restaurant gebruikt de verse, biologische basilicumblaadjes om een heerlijke pesto van te maken. Thaise basilicumblaadjes worden wekelijks geleverd aan een Thais restaurant.

“Kruiden zoals basilicum zijn echt geweldig, omdat je ze maar √©√©n keer hoeft te planten en je dan zes maanden lang bladeren kunt oogsten, als je weet hoe je het gewas goed moet beheren,” vertrouwt Frances ons toe. “We verkopen ook lokaal gemaakte manden met zaailingen van vijf verschillende kruiden voor iedereen die zijn eigen kleine kruidentuin wil beginnen.”

De boerderij heeft kippen, eenden en een visvijver. De zemelen van de rijstmolen worden gebruikt als veevoer. De uitwerpselen van het pluimvee worden verzameld om wormen te voeden die vermicompost produceren, wat helpt om de grond in de groentetuinen gezond en vruchtbaar te houden. Het volledig hergebruiken van de middelen van de boerderij vormt de kern van de boerderij en vereist creativiteit bij het plannen en af en toe aanpassingen.

Hoewel het bijhouden van een administratie nuttig is voor elke boer, is het een must voor biologische boeren, zoals Almario uitlegt voor de camera.

“Het bijhouden van een register is nodig voor biologische landbouw om onze gewassen te kunnen volgen: waar ze vandaan komen, hoe ze zijn verbouwd, welke inputs we hebben gebruikt. Het is essentieel wanneer we certificering aanvragen bij een derde partij of PGS, participatief garantiesysteem, om onze producten biologisch te certificeren.”

Het verbaast ons dat Almario chemisch ingenieur is. Niet echt het profiel dat je verwacht van een biologische boer.

Jarenlang woonden en werkten Almario en zijn vrouw in de hoofdstad Manilla. “Het was zo’n stressvol werk en leven dat het zelfs mijn gezondheid aantastte. Toen ik op controle ging bij mijn dokter waren al mijn uitslagen gevaarlijk tegen de grens aan: hoge bloedsuikerspiegel en urinezuur …. De dokter schreef medicijnen voor, maar ik wilde ze niet innemen omdat ik wist dat ze mijn nieren zouden aantasten. Ik heb toen mijn levensstijl 180 graden veranderd omdat ik van mijn gezondheid houd en langer op deze wereld wil blijven.”

In een jaar tijd leerde Almario over biologische landbouw en besloot toen om zijn eigen boerderij op te zetten. “Sindsdien eet ik alleen nog maar biologisch voedsel. Ik ben een gezond mens geworden. Onlangs ben ik nog onderzocht en mijn gezondheid is verbeterd; God zij dank daarvoor.”

Nu ze in de veertig zijn, zijn Almario en Frances niet alleen ondernemende boeren, ze hebben ook verschillende verkooppunten opgezet om verse producten te verkopen, maar ook potten ingemaakte papaja, chili-olie en verfrissende sappen gemaakt van de kleine calamansi-vruchten (Filipijnse limoen), licht op smaak gebracht met kruiden, gember en kurkuma.

Het echtpaar heeft Senoro Green Farm ook omgetoverd tot een unieke leerplek voor studenten die ge√Įnteresseerd zijn om ecologische of gecertificeerde biologische boeren te worden. Ze hebben net goedkeuring gekregen van de lokale autoriteiten om een officieel trainingscentrum op te zetten om jonge mensen te ondersteunen die een biologische boerderij willen beginnen, maar ook degenen die alleen maar willen leren over biologische landbouw.

En het gaat niet alleen om ecologische landbouw. De boerderij biedt ook een breed scala aan “boerderij ervaring” en “slow food ervaring” pakketten voor groepen of families voor 200 tot 600 pesos per persoon (3-10 euro), zoals gepresenteerd in hun promotiefolder.

Je kunt helpen met het verplanten van kruiden of groenten, dwergkokosnoten oogsten en genieten van het verfrissende kokoswater. Je kunt ook leren hoe je traditionele gerechten bereidt met inheems keukengerei en een traditionele kleipot. Een driegangendiner kan worden genuttigd in een bahay kubo, een traditioneel bamboe buitenhuis, waarbij het eten wordt gepresenteerd op bananenbladeren als borden.

Almario en Frances zijn er duidelijk in geslaagd om hun boerderij te ontwikkelen met respect voor het milieu en de traditionele cultuur. En ze zijn een inspiratie voor anderen geworden om agri-preneurs te worden. Soms is er een wake-up call nodig om mensen hun echte passie te laten ontdekken.

Tourist development September 10th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Rural communities are starting to welcome local tourism as a way to make money. And more people in the expanding cities of Latin America are now looking for outings they can take close to home.

This year, local officials in Anzaldo, in the provinces of Cochabamba, Bolivia, asked for help bringing tourists to their municipality. Aguiatur, an association of tour guides, offered to help.

In late June, Alberto Buitrón, who heads Aguiatur, and a carload of tour guides, visited Claudio Pérez, the young tourism-culture official for the municipal government of Anzaldo. They went to see local attractions, and people who could benefit from a tour. They also printed an attractive handout explaining what the visitors would see.

In late July, ads ran in the newspaper, promoting the tour, and inviting interested people to deposit 250 Bolivianos ($35) for every two passengers, into a certain bank account. Ana and I live in Cochabamba, 65 kilometers from Anzaldo, and we decided to make the trip, but the banks had already closed on Friday . So, I just went to the Aguiatur office. Alberto was busy preparing for the trip, but he graciously accepted my payment. ‚ÄúAnd with the two of you, the bus is closed,‚ÄĚ Alberto said, with an air of finality.

But by Saturday, more people had asked to go, and so Alberto charted a second bus and phoned the cook who would make our lunch on Sunday. At 8 PM, Saturday night, she agreed to make lunch the next day for 60 people instead of 30. In Bolivia, flexible planning often works just fine.

Early Sunday morning, we tourists met at Barba de Padilla, a small plaza in the old city of Cochabamba, and the tour agents assigned each person a seat on the bus. That would make it easy to see if anyone had strayed. Many of the tourists were retired people, more women than men, and a few grandkids. They were all from Bolivia, but many had never been to Anzaldo.

At each stop, Aguiatur had organized the local people to provide a service or sell food. In the hamlet of Flor de Pukara, we met Claudio, the municipal tourist official, but also Camila, just out of high school, and Zacarías Reyes, a retired school teacher. Camila and don Zacarías were from Flor de Pukara, and they were our local guides to show us the pre-Inka pukara (fortified site). This pukara was a cluster of stone walls on top of a rock crag. Tour guide Marizol Choquetopa, from Aguiatur, cautioned the group not to leave trash and not to remove any of the ancient pot sheds. And no one did, as near as I could tell. Our local guides told us stories about the place: spirits in the form of young ladies are said to appear on one rock outcropping, Torre Qaqa (Cliff Tower), to play music and dance at night.

We walked along the stone banks of the river, the Jatun Mayu. Then Camila’s mother served us phiri, a little dish of steamed cracked wheat, topped with cheese. It was faintly fermented, and fabulous.

In the small town of Anzaldo, we met Marco Delgadillo, a local agronomist and businessman, who has moved back to Anzaldo after his successful career in the city of Cochabamba. His hotel, El Molino del B√ļho (Owl Mill), includes a room for making and tasting chicha, a local alcoholic beverage brewed from maize. There was plenty of room for our large group in the salon, where we had a delicious lunch of lawa, a maize soup with potatoes, roast beef and chicken.

After lunch, our two buses gingerly navigated the narrow streets of the small town of Anzaldo. The town plaza had recently been fitted out with large models of dinosaurs to encourage visitors to come see fossils and dinosaur tracks. Two taxis were parked at the plaza, and the drivers evidently thought that they owned the town square. As the buses inched by, one taxi driver got out and angrily offered to come over and give our bus driver a beating. The passengers yelled back, urging the taxi driver to be reasonable, and he quieted down.

Our sense of adventure heightened by that buffoonish threat of violence, we drove out to the village of Tijraska. Local leaders clearly wanted to receive visitors. The community had prepared for our visit by putting up little signs indicating how to get to there. One of the leaders, don Mario, welcomed us in Quechua, the local language. Then he paused and asked if the tourists could understand Quechua.

Several people said yes, which delighted don Mario.

We strolled down to the banks of the muddy reservoir, in a narrow canyon. One young man, Ramiro, had bought a new wooden boat, with which he paddled small groups around an island in the reservoir.

For the grand finale, we stopped at the home of Ariel Angulo, a respected Bolivian musician, song writer and maker of musical instruments. Don Ariel played for us, and showed us the shop where he carves his wooden charangos, small stringed instruments. He explained that the charango was copied from a colonial Spanish instrument, the timple. After living in the city of Cochabamba for years, don Ariel has moved back home, to Anzaldo. The best charangos used to be made in Anzaldo, before the instrument makers moved to Cochabamba. Don Ariel hopes to teach young people to make charangos, and bring the craft back to Anzaldo.

This was the first ever package tour to come to Anzaldo. Local tourism from the emerging big cities of tropical countries can be a source of income for rural people, while teaching city people something about the countryside. Some people who left the small towns are retiring back in the countryside, and can help provide services to visitors and even bring traditional crafts back. It is easier for Bolivian tour guides to work with local tourists than foreign ones. For example, the local people speak the national languages. The local tour guides know how to deal with customers who sign up late. There may be risks of over-visitation, but for now, municipal governments are willing to explore tourism as development. And it can be done locally, with no foreign investment or international visitors.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to David Garviz√ļ, Irassema Guzm√°n, Marizol Choquetopa and Alberto Buitr√≥n of Aguiatur, for a safe and educational trip to Anzaldo. Alberto Buitr√≥n, Ana Gonz√°les and Paul Van Mele read and commented on an earlier version of this story.

A video from Anzaldo

Here is a video about producing healthy lupins, a nutritious. local food crop, filmed in Anzaldo in 2017. Growing lupin without disease

TURISMO PARA EL DESARROLLO

Jeff Bentley, 10 de septiembre del 2023

Las comunidades rurales empiezan a fomentar el turismo local para generar ingresos. Y más gente en las crecientes ciudades de Latinoamérica empieza a buscar destinos cerca de la casa.

Este a√Īo, algunos oficiales en Anzaldo, en las provincias de Cochabamba, Bolivia, pidieron ayuda para traer turistas a su municipio. Aguiatur, una asociaci√≥n de gu√≠as tur√≠sticos, ofreci√≥ su ayuda.

Fines de junio, Alberto Buitrón, el director de Aguiatur, y varios guías, visitaron a Claudio Pérez, el joven Responsable de Turismo-Cultura del municipio de Anzaldo. Visitaron a varios atractivos, y a vecinos que podrían aprovechar del tour. Además, imprimieron un lindo folleto explicando qué es que los visitantes verían.

Fines de julio, salieron anuncios en el peri√≥dico, promoviendo el tour, e invitando a los interesados a depositar 250 Bs. ($35) para cada par de pasajeros, en una cuenta bancaria. Ana y yo vivimos Cochabamba, a 65 kil√≥metros de Anzaldo, y reci√©n decidimos viajar despu√©s del cierre de los bancos el viernes. Por eso, fui no m√°s a las oficinas de Aguiatur. Alberto estaba en plenos preparativos para el tour, pero amablemente me atendi√≥. ‚ÄúY con ustedes dos, el bus est√° cerrado,‚ÄĚ dijo Alberto, con el aire de la finalidad.

Sin embargo, para el sábado más personas pidieron cupos, así que Alberto contrató un segundo bus, y llamó a la cocinera que haría nuestro almuerzo el domingo. A las 8 PM, el sábado, ella quedó en hacer almuerzo para el día siguiente para 60 personas en vez de 30. En Bolivia, la planificación flexible suele funcionar bastante bien.

A primera hora el domingo, los turistas nos reunimos en la peque√Īa plaza de Barba de Padilla, en el casco viejo de Cochabamba, y los gu√≠as tur√≠sticos asignaron a cada persona un asiento en el bus. As√≠ podr√≠an llevar un buen control y no perder a nadie. Muchos de los turistas eran jubilados, m√°s mujeres que hombres, con algunos nietitos. Todos eran de Bolivia, pero muchos no conoc√≠an a Anzaldo.

En cada escala, Aguiatur hab√≠a organizado a la gente local para dar un servicio o vender comida. En el caser√≠o de Flor de Pukara, conocimos a Claudio, el oficial de turismo municipal, pero tambi√©n a Camila, reci√©n egresada del colegio, y Zacar√≠as Reyes, un profesor jubilado. Camila y don Zacar√≠as eran de Flor de Pukara, y como gu√≠as locales nos mostraron la Pukara preincaica. La pukara era una colecci√≥n de muros de piedra encima de un pe√Īasco. Nuestra gu√≠a Marizol Choquetopa, de Aguiatur, advirti√≥ al grupo no botar basura y no llevar los tiestos antiguos. Y que yo sepa, nadie lo hizo. Nuestros gu√≠as locales nos contaron cuentos del lugar: esp√≠ritus en forma de se√Īoritas que aparecen sobre una un pe√Īasco, Torre Qaqa, para tocar m√ļsica y bailar de noche.

Caminamos sobre las orillas pedregosas del río Jatun Mayu. Luego la mamá de Camila nos sirvió un platillo de phiri, trigo quebrado al vapor con un poco de queso encima. Ligeramente fermentada, era fabulosa.

En el pueblo de Anzaldo, conocimos a Marco Delgadillo, agr√≥nomo local y empresario, que hab√≠a retornado a Anzaldo despu√©s de su exitosa carrera en la ciudad de Cochabamba. Su hotel, El Molino del B√ļho, incluye un cuarto para hacer y catear chicha de ma√≠z. Hab√≠a amplio campo para nuestro grupo en el sal√≥n principal, donde disfrutamos de un almuerzo delicioso de lawa, una sopa de ma√≠z con papas, carne asada y pollo.

Despu√©s del almuerzo, nuestros dos buses lentamente navegaron las estrechas calles del pueblo de Anzaldo. En la plaza se hab√≠an instalado modelos grandes de dinosaurios para animar a los turistas a visitar para ver a los f√≥siles y huellas de dinosaurios. Dos taxis estacionados se hab√≠an adue√Īado de la plaza. Los buses pasaban cent√≠metro por cent√≠metro, cuando un taxista sali√≥ y, perdiendo los cables, ofreci√≥ dar una paliza a nuestro conductor. Los pasajeros gritamos en su defensa, sugiriendo calma, y el taxista se call√≥.

Después del show del taxista payaso, tuvimos más ganas todavía para la aventura, mientras nos dirigimos a la comunidad de Tijraska. Los dirigentes claramente querían recibir visitas. La comunidad había preparado para nuestra visita, colocando letreros indicando el camino. Uno de los dirigentes, don Mario, nos dio la bienvenida en quechua, el idioma local. Luego pausó y dijo que tal vez no todos hablábamos el quechua.

De una vez, varios dijeron que sí, lo cual encantó a don Mario.

Caminamos a las orillas de un reservorio con agua color de tierra, en un ca√Ī√≥n angosto. Un joven, Ramiro, hab√≠a comprado una nueva lancha. Subimos en peque√Īos grupos y a remo nos mostr√≥ una isla en el reservorio.

Para cerrar con broche de oro, visitamos la casa de Ariel Angulo, un respetado m√ļsico boliviano. Tambi√©n es cantautor y hace finos instrumentos musicales. Don Ariel toc√≥ un par de canciones para nosotros, y nos mostr√≥ su taller de charangos de madera. Explic√≥ que el charango se copi√≥ durante la colonia de un instrumento espa√Īol, el timple. Despu√©s de vivir durante a√Īos en la ciudad de Cochabamba, don Ariel ha vuelto a su tierra natal, a Anzaldo. En anta√Īo los mejores charangos se hac√≠an en Anzaldo, antes de que los fabricantes se fueron a Cochabamba. Don Ariel espera ense√Īar a los j√≥venes a hacer charangos, y devolver esta arte a Anzaldo.

Nuestra gira a Anzaldo era el primero en la historia. El turismo local, partiendo de las pujantes ciudades de los pa√≠ses tropicales, puede ser una fuente de ingreso para la gente rural, mientras los citadinos aprendemos algo del campo. Algunas personas que abandonaron las provincias est√°n volviendo, y pueden ayudar a dar servicios a los visitantes, y hasta dar vida a las artes tradicionales. Es m√°s f√°cil para gu√≠as bolivianos trabajar con turistas locales que con extranjeros. Por ejemplo, los turistas locales hablan los idiomas nacionales. Los gu√≠as locales saben lidiar con clientes que se apuntan a √ļltima hora. S√≠ se corre el riesgo de una sobre visitaci√≥n, pero para ahora, los gobiernos municipales est√°n explorando al turismo local como una contribuci√≥n del desarrollo. Y se puede hacer con recursos locales, sin inversi√≥n extranjera y sin turistas internacionales.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a David Garviz√ļ, Irassema Guzm√°n, Marizol Choquetopa y Alberto Buitr√≥n de Aguiatur, por un viaje seguro y educativo a Anzaldo. Alberto Buitr√≥n, Ana Gonz√°les y Paul Van Mele leyeron e hicieron comentarios sobre una versi√≥n previa de este relato.

Un video de Anzaldo

Aquí está un video que muestra cómo producir tarwi (lupino) sano, un nutritivo alimento local, filmado en Anzaldo en el 2017. Producir tarwi sin enfermedad.

 

Proinpa: Agricultural research worth waiting for May 21st, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Agricultural research is notoriously slow. It takes years to bear fruit, and donor-funded agencies don’t always last very long. But Bolivia got lucky with one organization that survived.

It started in 1989, when the Swiss funded a project to do potato research, the Potato Research Program (Proinpa), working closely with a core staff of four scientists from the International Potato Center (CIP). Most of the other staff were young Bolivians, including many thesis students.

Ten years later, in 1998, it was time to fold up the project, but some visionary people from Proinpa, with enthusiastic support of Swiss and CIP colleagues, decided to give Proinpa a new life as a permanent agency or foundation.

By then ‚ÄúProinpa‚ÄĚ had some name-brand recognition, so they wisely kept the acronym, but changed the full name to ‚ÄúPromotion and Research of Andean Products.‚ÄĚ Proinpa‚Äôs leaders were not going to limit themselves to potatoes any more. The Swiss provided an endowment to pay for core costs, but it was not enough to run the whole organization.

Proinpa went through some rough times. When they stopped being a project, they had to give up their spacious offices in the city of Cochabamba. For a while they rented an aging building far from the city that had been used as a government rabies control center. Later, they could only afford one floor of that building. I remember being there on moving day, years ago, when they were all cramming into the smaller space, happily carrying boxes of files to squeeze together into shared offices. They were surviving.

Survival was important. Public-sector agricultural research in Bolivia was going through some rough times. The Bolivian Institute of Agricultural and Livestock Research (IBTA) closed in 1997 and its replacement died a few years later. Government agricultural research only started again In 2008, when the National Institute of Agricultural and Livestock and Forestry Innovation (INIAF) was created. During those years, Proinpa was an outstanding center for agricultural research in Bolivia, and curated priceless collections of potatoes and quinoas.

That potato seedbank was kept at Toralapa, in the countryside some 70 km from the city of Cochabamba. Over the years, Proinpa had expanded the collection from 1000 accessions to 4000. This biodiversity is the source of genetic material that plant breeders need to create new varieties. In 2010, the government, which owned the station at Toralapa, turned it over to INIAF. Proinpa worked with INIAF for a year, to ensure a stable transition, and the government of Bolivia still maintains that collection of potatoes and other Andean crops.

Proinpa recently asked me to join them for their 25th anniversary event, held at their small campus, built after 2005. The celebration started with tours of stands, where Proinpa highlighted their most important research.

Dr. Ximena Cadima, member of the Bolivian Academy of Science, explained how Proinpa has used its knowledge of local crops to breed 69 officially released new varieties, of the potato, quinoa and seven other crops. They also encouraging farmers to grow native potatoes on their farms, which is also crucial for keeping these unique crops alive.

Luis Crespo, entomologist, and Giovanna Plata, plant pathologist, explained their research to develop ecological alternatives to pest control. Luis talked about his work with insect sex pheromones. One of the many things he does is to dissect female moths and remove their scent glands, which he sends to a company in the Netherlands that isolates the sex pheromone from the glands. The company synthesizes the pheromone, makes more of it, and Proinpa uses it to bait traps. Male moths smell the pheromone, think it is a receptive female and fly to it. The frustrated males die in the trap. The females can’t lay eggs without mating, eliminating the next generation of pests before they are born.

Giovana showed us how they study the microbes that kill pathogens. She places different fungi and bacteria in petri dishes to see which microorganisms can physically displace the germs that cause crop diseases. She also isolates plant growth hormones, produced by the good microbes.

This background work on the ecology of microbes has informed Proinpa’s efforts to create a new industry of benign pest control. Jimmy Ciancas, an engineer, led us around Proinpa’s new plant, where they produce tons of beneficial bacteria and fungi to replace the chemicals that farmers use to control pests and diseases.

Proinpa also shows off the research by Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio and colleagues who are developing windbreaks of native plants and sowing wild lupines as a cover crop. This research aims to save the high Andes from the devastating erosion unleashed when the Quinoa Boom of 2010-2014 stripped away native vegetation. The soil simply blew away.

Later, we moved to Proinpa’s comfortable lunch room, which is shaded, but open to the air on three sides, perfect for Cochabamba’s climate. The place had been set up as a formal auditorium, where, for over an hour, Proinpa gave plaques to honor some of the many organizations that had helped them over the years: universities, INIAF, small-town mayors in the municipalities where Proinpa does field work. Many organizations reciprocated, giving Proinpa an award right back. Proinpa has survived because of good leadership, and because of its many friends.

In between the speeches, I got a chance to meet the man sitting next to me, Lionel Ichazo, who supervises three large, commercial farms for a food processing company in the lowlands of Eastern Bolivia. They grow soya in the summer and wheat and sorghum in the winter. Lionel confirmed what Proinpa says, that the use of natural pesticides is exploding on the low plains. Lionel uses Proinpa’s natural pesticides as a seed dressing to control disease. Lionel, who is also an agronomist and a graduate of El Zamorano, one of Latin America’s top agricultural universities (in Honduras), said that he noticed how the soil has been improving over the four years that he has used the microbes. The microorganisms were break down the crop stubble into carbon that the plants can use. Lionel added that most of the large-scale farmers are still treating their seeds with agrochemicals. But they are starting to see that the biological products work, at affordable prices, and are often even cheaper than the chemicals. Of course, the biologicals are safer to handle, and environmentally friendly. And that is key to their success. Demand is skyrocketing.

It has taken many years of research to produce environmentally-sound, biological pesticides that can convince large-scale commercial farmers to start to transition away from agrochemicals. I thought back to a time about 15 years earlier, when I saw Proinpa doing trials with farmers near Cochabamba. That was an early stage of these scientifically-sound natural products. Agricultural research is slow by nature, but like a fruit tree that takes years to mature, the wait is worth the while.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Don’t eat the peels

Commercializing organic inputs

The best knowledge is local and scientific

Recovering from the quinoa boom

Related videos

Making enriched biofertilizer

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

The wasp that protects our crops

Managing the potato tuber moth

Acknowledgements

Paul Van Mele, Graham Thiele, Rolando Oros, Jorge Blajos and Lionel Ichazo read and commented on an earlier version of this blog.

PROINPA: INVESTIGACI√ďN AGR√ćCOLA QUE VALE LA PENA ESPERAR

Jeff Bentley, 21 de mayo del 2023

La investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola es notoriamente lenta. Tarda a√Īos en dar frutos, y los programas financiados por donantes suelen durar poco tiempo. Pero Bolivia tuvo suerte con una organizaci√≥n que sobrevivi√≥.

Empezó en 1989, cuando los suizos financiaron un proyecto nuevo, el Proyecto de Investigación de la Papa (Proinpa), en colaboración con cuatro científicos del Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). Casi todo el resto del personal eran jóvenes bolivianos, entre ellos muchos tesistas.

Diez a√Īos despu√©s, en 1998, lleg√≥ el momento de cerrar el proyecto, pero algunas personas visionarias de Proinpa, con el apoyo entusiasta de colegas suizos y del CIP, decidieron dar a Proinpa una nueva vida como agencia o fundaci√≥n permanente.

Para entonces “Proinpa” ya ten√≠a cierto reconocimiento como marca, as√≠ que sabiamente mantuvieron el acr√≥nimo, pero cambiaron el nombre completo a “Promoci√≥n e Investigaci√≥n de Productos Andinos”. Los dirigentes de Proinpa ya no iban a limitarse a las papas. Los suizos aportaron una dotaci√≥n para cubrir los gastos b√°sicos, pero no era suficiente para hacer funcionar toda la organizaci√≥n.

Proinpa pas√≥ por momentos dif√≠ciles. Cuando dejaron de ser un proyecto, tuvieron que abandonar sus amplias oficinas de la ciudad de Cochabamba. Durante un tiempo alquilaron un viejo edificio alejado de la ciudad que hab√≠a sido un centro gubernamental de control de la rabia. M√°s tarde, s√≥lo pudieron pagar una planta de ese edificio. Recuerdo estar all√≠ el d√≠a de la mudanza, hace a√Īos, cuando todos se dieron modos para entrar en el espacio m√°s peque√Īo, cargando alegremente cajas de archivos para apretarse en oficinas compartidas. Estaban sobreviviendo.

Sobrevivir era importante. La investigaci√≥n agraria p√ļblica en Bolivia atravesaba tiempos dif√≠ciles. El Instituto Boliviano de Investigaci√≥n Agropecuaria (IBTA) cerr√≥ en 1997 y su sustituto muri√≥ pocos a√Īos despu√©s. La investigaci√≥n agropecuaria estatal no se reanud√≥ hasta 2008, cuando se cre√≥ el Instituto Nacional de Innovaci√≥n Agropecuaria y Forestal (INIAF). Durante esos a√Īos, Proinpa fue un destacado centro de investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola en Bolivia, y conserv√≥ invaluables colecciones de papa y quinua.

Ese banco de semillas de papa se manten√≠a en Toralapa, en el campo, a unos 70 km de la ciudad de Cochabamba. Con los a√Īos, Proinpa hab√≠a ampliado la colecci√≥n de 1000 accesiones a 4000. Esta biodiversidad es la fuente de material gen√©tico que necesitan los fitomejoradores para crear nuevas variedades. En 2010, el Gobierno, que era propietario de la estaci√≥n de Toralapa, la cedi√≥ al INIAF. Proinpa trabaj√≥ con el INIAF durante un a√Īo para garantizar una transici√≥n estable, y el Gobierno de Bolivia sigue manteniendo esa colecci√≥n de papas y otros cultivos andinos.

Hace poco, Proinpa me pidi√≥ que me uniera a ellos en el acto de su 25 aniversario, celebrado en su peque√Īo campus, construido despu√©s de 2005. La celebraci√≥n comenz√≥ con visitas a los stands, donde Proinpa destac√≥ sus investigaciones m√°s importantes.

La Dra. Ximena Cadima, miembro de la Academia Boliviana de Ciencias, explic√≥ c√≥mo Proinpa ha usado su conocimiento de los cultivos locales para obtener 69 nuevas variedades oficialmente liberadas de papa, quinua y siete cultivos m√°s. Tambi√©n animan a los agricultores a cultivar papas nativas en sus chacras, lo que tambi√©n es crucial para mantener vivos estos cultivos √ļnicos.

Luis Crespo, entomólogo, y Giovanna Plata, fitopatóloga, explicaron sus investigaciones para desarrollar alternativas ecológicas al control de plagas. Luis habló de su trabajo con las feromonas sexuales de los insectos. Una de las muchas cosas que hace es disecar polillas hembras y extraerles las glándulas de olor, que envía a una empresa en Holanda que aísla la feromona sexual de las glándulas. La empresa sintetiza la feromona, fabrica más y Proinpa la usa para cebo de trampas. Las polillas machos huelen la feromona, piensan que se trata de una hembra receptiva y vuelan hacia ella. Los machos frustrados mueren en la trampa. Las hembras no pueden poner huevos sin aparearse, lo que elimina la siguiente generación de plagas antes de que nazcan.

Giovana nos mostró cómo estudian los microbios que matan a los patógenos. Coloca diferentes hongos y bacterias en placas Petri para ver qué microorganismos pueden desplazar físicamente a los gérmenes que causan enfermedades en los cultivos. También aísla hormonas de crecimiento de plantas, producidas por los microbios buenos.

Este trabajo sobre la ecología de los microbios ha permitido a Proinpa crear una nueva industria de control natural de plagas. Jimmy Ciancas, ingeniero, nos guio por la nueva planta de Proinpa, donde producen toneladas de bacterias y hongos benéficos para sustituir a los químicos que los agricultores fumigan para controlar plagas y enfermedades.

Proinpa también nos mostró las investigaciones del Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio y sus colegas, que están desarrollando rompevientos con plantas nativas y sembrando tarwi silvestre como cultivo de cobertura. Esta investigación tiene como objetivo salvar a los altos Andes de la devastadora erosión desatada cuando el boom de la quinua de (2010-2014) arrasó con la vegetación nativa. El suelo simplemente se voló.

M√°s tarde, nos trasladamos al confortable comedor de Proinpa, sombreado pero abierto al aire por tres lados, perfecto para el clima de Cochabamba. El lugar hab√≠a sido acondicionado como un auditorio formal, donde, durante m√°s de una hora, Proinpa entreg√≥ placas en honor a algunas de las muchas organizaciones que les hab√≠an ayudado a lo largo de los a√Īos: universidades, INIAF, alcaldes de municipios donde Proinpa hace trabajo de campo. Muchas organizaciones reciprocaron, entregando a Proinpa premios que ellos trajeron. Proinpa ha sobrevivido gracias a un buen liderazgo y a sus muchos amigos.

Entre los discursos, tuve la oportunidad de conocer al hombre sentado a mi lado, Lionel Ichazo, que supervisa tres fincas comerciales para una empresa molinera en las tierras bajas del este de Bolivia. Cultivan soya en verano y trigo y sorgo en invierno. Lionel confirm√≥ lo que Proinpa dice, que el uso de plaguicidas naturales se est√° disparando en las llanuras bajas. Lionel usa los plaguicidas naturales de Proinpa como tratamiento de semillas para controlar las enfermedades. Lionel, que tambi√©n es ingeniero agr√≥nomo y graduado de El Zamorano, una de las mejores universidades agr√≠colas de Am√©rica Latina (en Honduras), dijo que not√≥ c√≥mo el suelo ha ido mejorando durante los cuatro a√Īos que ha usado los microbios. Los microorganismos descompon√≠an los rastrojos en carbono que las plantas pod√≠an usar. Lionel a√Īadi√≥ que la mayor√≠a de los agricultores a gran escala siguen usando agroqu√≠micos en el tratamiento de semillas. Sin embargo, se est√° viendo que los productos biol√≥gicos funcionan, con precios accesibles y hasta m√°s baratos que los qu√≠micos. Por supuesto son m√°s sanos para el manipuleo y amigables con el medio ambiente. Y eso es la clave del √©xito de los productos. La demanda se est√° disparando.

Ha tomado muchos a√Īos de investigaci√≥n para producir plaguicidas biol√≥gicos que cuidan el medio ambiente y que puedan convencer a los agricultores comerciales para que empiecen a abandonar los productos agroqu√≠micos. Me acord√© de una √©poca, unos 15 a√Īos antes, cuando vi a Proinpa haciendo ensayos con agricultores cerca de Cochabamba. Aquella fue una etapa temprana de estos productos naturales con base cient√≠fica. La investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola es lenta por naturaleza, pero como un √°rbol frutal que tarda a√Īos en madurar, la espera vale la pena.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

No te comas las c√°scaras

Commercializing organic inputs

El mejor conocimiento es local y científico

Recuper√°ndose del boom de la quinua

Videos relacionados

Cómo hacer un abono biofoliar

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

La avispa que protege nuestros cultivos

Manejando la polilla de la papa

Agradecimientos

Paul Van Mele, Graham Thiele, Rolando Oros, Jorge Blajos y Lionel Ichazo leyeron e hicieron comentarios valiosos sobre una versión previa de este blog.

.

 

Shopping with mom February 12th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Shopping can not only be fun, but healthy and educational, as Paul and Marcella and I learned recently while filming a video in Cochabamba, Bolivia.

We visited a stall run by Laura Guzmán, who we have met in a previous blog story. Laura’s stall is so busy that her brother and a cousin help out. They sell the family’s own produce, some from the neighbors, and some they buy wholesale.

The market is clean and open to the light and air. All of the stalls neatly display their vegetables, grains and flowers. While Marcella films, Paul and I stand to one side, keeping out of the shot. Paul is quick to observe that Laura holds up each package of vegetables, explaining them to her customers. One pair of women listen attentively, and then buy several packages before moving on to another stall.

Paul reminds me that we need to interview consumers for this video on selling organic produce, so we approach the two shoppers. As in Ecuador, when we filmed consumers in the market, I was pleasantly surprised how strangers can be quite happy to appear on an educational video.

One of the women, Sonia Pinedo, spoke with confidence into the camera, explaining how she always looks for organic produce. ‚ÄúOrganic vegetables are important, because they are not contaminated and they are good for your health.‚ÄĚ

‚ÄúAnd now you can interview my daughter,‚ÄĚ Sonia said, nudging the young woman next to her.

Her daughter, 21-year-old university student, Lorena Quispe, spoke about how important it was to engage young consumers, teaching them to demand chemical-free food. She pointed out that if youth start eating right when they are young, they will not only live longer, but when they reach 60, they will still be healthy, and able to enjoy life. Remarkably, Lorena also pointed out that consumers play a role supporting organic farmers. She had clearly understood that choosing good food also builds communities.

Food shopping is often a way for parents to spend time with their children, and to pass on knowledge about food and healthy living, so that the kids grow up to be thoughtful young adults.

Watch a related video

Creating agroecological markets

DE COMPRAS CON MAM√Ā

Jeff Bentley, 5 de febrero del 2023

Ir de compras no sólo puede ser divertido, sino también saludable y educativo, como Paul, Marcella y yo aprendimos hace poco mientras grabábamos un video en Cochabamba, Bolivia.

Visitamos un puesto de ventas de Laura Guzm√°n, a quien ya conocimos en una historia anterior del blog. El puesto de Laura est√° tan concurrido que su hermano y un primo la ayudan. Venden los productos de la familia, algunos de los vecinos y otros que compran al por mayor.

El mercado est√° limpio y abierto a la luz y al aire. Todos los puestos exponen con esmero sus verduras, cereales y flores. Mientras Marcella filma, Paul y yo nos quedamos a un lado, fuera del plano. Paul no tarda en observar que Laura sostiene en alto cada paquete de verduras, explic√°ndoselas a sus clientes. Un par de mujeres escuchan atentamente y compran varios paquetes antes de pasar a otro puesto.

Paul me recuerda que tenemos que entrevistar a los consumidores para este video sobre la venta de productos ecológicos, así que nos acercamos a las dos compradoras. Al igual que en Ecuador, cuando filmamos a los consumidores en el mercado, me sorprendió gratamente que a pesar de que no nos conocen, están dispuestos a salir en un video educativo.

Una de las mujeres, Sonia Pinedo, habla con confianza a la c√°mara y explica que siempre busca productos ecol√≥gicos. “Las verduras ecol√≥gicas son importantes, porque no est√°n contaminadas y son buenas para la salud”.

“Y ahora puedes entrevistar a mi hija”, dijo Sonia, dando un codazo a la joven que estaba a su lado.

Su hija, Lorena Quispe, una estudiante universitaria de 21 a√Īos, habl√≥ de la importancia de involucrar a los j√≥venes consumidores, ense√Ī√°ndoles a exigir alimentos libres de productos qu√≠micos. Se√Īal√≥ que, si los j√≥venes empiezan a comer bien de peque√Īos, no s√≥lo vivir√°n m√°s, sino que cuando lleguen a los 60 seguir√°n estando sanos y podr√°n disfrutar de la vida. Sorprendentemente, Lorena tambi√©n se√Īal√≥ que los consumidores juegan un papel de apoyo a los agricultores ecol√≥gicos. Hab√≠a comprendido claramente que elegir buenos alimentos tambi√©n construye comunidades.

La compra de alimentos suele ser una forma de que los padres pasen tiempo con sus hijos y les transmitan conocimientos sobre alimentaci√≥n y vida sana, para que los ni√Īos se conviertan en j√≥venes adultos pensativos.

Vea un video relacionado

Creando ferias agroecológicas

Design by Olean webdesign