WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

The nitrogen crisis July 3rd, 2022 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

The European Union, along with most countries across the world, has agreed to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases to curb the negative effects of climate change, which are already apparent. Under the Green Deal, the EU aims to be climate neutral by 2050. Besides investments in more sustainable energy production and consumption (transport, housing 
), further improvements are also needed in the food sector. But there is little consensus on how farmers should be supported.

Looking at the demographic trends in rural Europe, the proposed solutions will need to consider farm size. From 2005 to 2013, across Europe the number of farms with less than 50 hectares of land steadily decreased, while those between 50 and 100 hectares remained more or less stable. Those over 100 hectares slightly increased. Yet more than half of the farming population in Europe is older than 55 years (EuroStat, 2021). Meanwhile, the younger farmers have invested in labour-saving equipment, for example to work the larger holdings, acquiring high debts along the way. Further investment in climate mitigation will require proper support so that when the older farmers retire, the next generation will be able cope with the ever-increasing pressure of bank loans.

The war in Ukraine has triggered a sharp rise in the price of artificial fertilizers, making chemical-based farming less profitable. It is estimated that globally only one third of the applied nitrogen from chemical fertilizers is used by crops. Combined with the mounting pressure on farmers to help mitigate climate change by reducing carbon and nitrogen emissions, farmers are keen to optimise the use of animal manure.

While animal and human manure has been used to keep soils fertile for thousands of years, something has gone wrong in the recent past.

In a German documentary on the Aztecs, called Children of the Sun, ethnologist Antje Gunsenheimer describes some ancient human manure management. The central market in TenochtitlĂĄn, the Aztec capital, had public toilets where urine and faeces were collected separately in clay pots. Dung traders sold the composted dung as fertilizer, while the urine was used for dying fabric and leather tanning.

From the earliest days of farming in Europe, animals were kept on deep bedding of straw. But nowadays most animals in Europe are kept on a metal grid, and the mix of urine and dung is collected in large, underground reservoirs. When excrement and urine from cows or pigs mix, a lot of methane gas (CH4) and ammonia (NH4) is produced. The old practices of using straw as bedding, as well as innovative designs to separate the dung form the urine, is getting some renewed attention in livestock farming, because when separated, greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced by up to 75%.

Bedding with crop residues such as wheat straw may provide substantial benefits.

Engineers in the Netherlands, the USA, Israel and various other countries are researching how best to adjust modern livestock sheds. Some promising examples include free walk housing systems that operate with composting bedding material or artificial permeable floors as lying and walking areas. Other sustainable techniques that are being explored include the CowToilet, which separates faeces and urine. As converting housing systems may be costly and therefore only adopted slowly by farmers, it is important to also experiment with better ways of applying liquid manure.

In modern livestock systems, urine and manure are mixed with the water used to wash the pens. Getting rid of this slurry, or liquid manure, has become a main environmental concern. When liquid manure is applied to the soil, much of the nitrogen evaporates as nitrous oxide or N2O, a greenhouse gas 300 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. Another fraction is converted to nitrates (NO3), which seep through the soil and pollute the ground water. While manure used to be a crucial resource, it has now become a waste product and an expense for farmers.

Making better use of animal waste will be crucial for the future of our food. One key factor is the lack of soil organic matter and good microbes, that can help capture nitrogen and release this more slowly to benefit crops.

Solutions that are financially feasible for farmers will require the best of ideas, with inputs from farmers, soil scientists, microbiologists, ecologists, chemical and mechanical engineers, as well as social scientists.

Practices that help to build up soil carbon will be crucial to reduce the environmental impact of animal manure and fertilizers. Ploughing is known to have a detrimental effect on soil organic matter, as it induces oxidation of soil carbon. Reduced tillage or zero tillage for crop cultivation, and regenerative farming to make animal farming more sustainable, has been promoted and used in the USA and other parts of the world, and could be explored more intensively in Europe.

Also, there will be a need to revive soil micro-organisms, as these have been seriously affected by the use of agrochemicals and the reduced availability of soil organic matter. The expensive machines that are currently used by service providers to spread or inject liquid manure in farmers’ fields could equally be used to inject solutions with good micro-organisms that will help to capture nitrogen to then release it to crops, and build up a healthy soil.

Human creativity will be required to help come up with solutions that are economically feasible for farmers in the near future. To make this happen as fast as possible, more investments are required in research that truly addresses the fundamentals of the problems. Still, far too much public money is invested in research on new crop varieties, livestock feed, and the application of agrochemicals, all of which are to the benefit of large corporations.

Photo credit: The photo on the straw bedding is by Herbert Wiggerman.

More reading

Galama, P. J., Ouweltjes, W., Endres, M. I., Sprecher, J. R., Leso, L., Kuipers, A., Klopčič, M. 2020. Symposium review: Future of housing for dairy cattle. Journal of Dairy Science, 103(6), pp. 5759-5772. Available at:  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022030220302988

Related blogs

Capturing carbon in our soils

Reviving soils

Effective micro-organisms

A revolution for our soil

Repurposing farm machinery

Related videos

Good microbes for plants and soil

Organic biofertilizer in liquid and solid form

Coir pith

Mulch for a better soil and crop

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Inspiring platforms

Access Agriculture: hosts over 220 training videos in over 90 languages on a diversity of crops and livestock, sustainable soil and water management, basic food processing, etc. Each video describes underlying principles, as such encouraging people to experiment with new ideas.

EcoAgtube: a social media video platform where anyone from across the globe can upload their own videos related to natural farming and circular economy.

 

De stikstofcrisis

De Europese Unie heeft, samen met de meeste landen in de wereld, afgesproken de uitstoot van broeikasgassen te verminderen om de negatieve gevolgen van de klimaatverandering, die nu al merkbaar zijn, te beperken. In het kader van de Green Deal streeft de EU ernaar tegen 2050 klimaatneutraal te zijn. Naast investeringen in duurzamere energieproductie en -consumptie (vervoer, huisvesting …) zijn ook verdere verbeteringen nodig in de voedselsector. Maar er is weinig consensus over hoe landbouwers moeten worden ondersteund.

Als we kijken naar de demografische tendensen op het Europese platteland, moet bij de voorgestelde oplossingen rekening worden gehouden met de omvang van de landbouwbedrijven. Tussen 2005 en 2013 is in heel Europa het aantal landbouwbedrijven met minder dan 50 hectare gestaag gedaald, terwijl het aantal bedrijven tussen 50 en 100 hectare min of meer stabiel is gebleven. Het aantal bedrijven met meer dan 100 hectare is licht gestegen. Toch is meer dan de helft van de landbouwbevolking in Europa ouder dan 55 jaar (EuroStat, 2021). Ondertussen hebben de jongere boeren geĂŻnvesteerd in arbeidsbesparende apparatuur, bijvoorbeeld om de grotere bedrijven te bewerken, waarbij ze onderweg hoge schulden hebben gemaakt. Voor verdere investeringen in klimaatmitigatie is goede ondersteuning nodig, zodat wanneer de oudere boeren met pensioen gaan, de volgende generatie het hoofd kan bieden aan de almaar toenemende druk van bankleningen.

De oorlog in OekraĂŻne heeft geleid tot een sterke stijging van de prijs van kunstmest, waardoor landbouw op basis van chemische stoffen minder winstgevend is geworden. Bovendien wordt naar schatting wereldwijd slechts een derde van de stikstof uit kunstmest door de gewassen gebruikt. In combinatie met de toenemende druk op landbouwers om de klimaatverandering te helpen beperken door de uitstoot van koolstof en stikstof te verminderen, zijn landbouwers erop gebrand het gebruik van dierlijke mest te optimaliseren.

Hoewel dierlijke en menselijke mest al duizenden jaren wordt gebruikt om de bodem vruchtbaar te houden, is er in het recente verleden iets misgegaan.

In een Duitse documentaire over de Azteken, genaamd Children of the Sun, beschrijft etnologe Antje Gunsenheimer hoe men in de oudheid met menselijke mest omging. De centrale markt in TenochtitlĂĄn, de Azteekse hoofdstad, had openbare toiletten waar urine en uitwerpselen gescheiden werden opgevangen in kleipotten. Mesthandelaren verkochten de gecomposteerde mest als meststof, terwijl de urine werd gebruikt voor het verven van stoffen en het looien van leer.

Vanaf de begindagen van de landbouw in Europa werden dieren gehouden op een diep strobed. Maar tegenwoordig worden de meeste dieren in Europa op een metalen rooster gehouden, en wordt het mengsel van urine en mest opgevangen in grote, ondergrondse reservoirs. Wanneer uitwerpselen en urine van koeien of varkens zich vermengen, ontstaat er veel methaangas (CH4) en ammoniak (NH4).

De oude praktijk van het gebruik van stro als strooisel en innovatieve ontwerpen om de mest van de urine te scheiden, krijgt hernieuwde aandacht in de veehouderij, omdat bij scheiding de uitstoot van broeikasgassen tot 75% kan worden verminderd.

Bedding with crop residues such as wheat straw may provide substantial benefits.

Ingenieurs in Nederland, de VS, Israël en diverse andere landen onderzoeken hoe moderne stallen het best kunnen worden aangepast. Enkele veelbelovende voorbeelden zijn huisvestingssystemen met vrije uitloop die werken met composterend strooiselmateriaal of kunstmatige doorlaatbare vloeren als lig- en loopruimte. Andere duurzame technieken die worden onderzocht zijn onder meer het CowToilet, dat uitwerpselen en urine scheidt. Aangezien het ombouwen van stalsystemen kostbaar kan zijn en daarom slechts langzaam door boeren wordt overgenomen, is het belangrijk om ook te experimenteren met betere manieren om vloeibare mest toe te dienen.

In moderne veeteeltsystemen worden urine en mest vermengd met het water dat wordt gebruikt om de boxen te wassen. Het wegwerken van deze gier, of vloeibare mest, is een belangrijk milieuprobleem geworden. Wanneer vloeibare mest op de bodem wordt gebracht, verdampt een groot deel van de stikstof in de vorm van stikstofoxide of N2O, een broeikasgas dat 300 keer krachtiger is dan koolstofdioxide. Een ander deel wordt omgezet in nitraten (NO3), die door de bodem sijpelen en het grondwater verontreinigen. Terwijl mest vroeger een cruciale hulpbron was, is het nu een afvalproduct en een kostenpost voor de landbouwers geworden.

Een beter gebruik van dierlijk afval zal van cruciaal belang zijn voor de toekomst van ons voedsel. Een belangrijke factor is het gebrek aan organisch materiaal en goede microben in de bodem, die kunnen helpen stikstof vast te leggen en langzamer vrij te geven ten voordele van de gewassen.

Om oplossingen te vinden die voor de landbouwers financieel haalbaar zijn, zullen de beste ideeën moeten worden uitgewisseld, met bijdragen van landbouwers, bodemwetenschappers, microbiologen, ecologen, chemische en mechanische ingenieurs en sociale wetenschappers.

Praktijken die helpen bij de opbouw van koolstof in de bodem zullen van cruciaal belang zijn om de milieueffecten van dierlijke mest en meststoffen te verminderen. Het is bekend dat ploegen een nadelig effect heeft op het organisch materiaal in de bodem, aangezien het de oxidatie van koolstof in de bodem induceert. Verminderde grondbewerking of nulgrondbewerking voor de teelt van gewassen, en regeneratieve landbouw om de veehouderij duurzamer te maken, worden in de VS en andere delen van de wereld gestimuleerd en toegepast, en zouden in Europa intensiever kunnen worden onderzocht.

Ook zullen de micro-organismen in de bodem nieuw leven moeten worden ingeblazen, aangezien deze ernstig zijn aangetast door het gebruik van landbouwchemicaliën en de verminderde beschikbaarheid van organisch materiaal in de bodem. De dure machines die momenteel door dienstverleners worden gebruikt om vloeibare mest over de akkers van de landbouwers uit te strooien of te injecteren, zouden ook kunnen worden gebruikt om oplossingen met goede micro-organismen te injecteren die stikstof helpen vastleggen om het vervolgens aan de gewassen af te geven, en een gezonde bodem op te bouwen.

Menselijke creativiteit zal nodig zijn om in de nabije toekomst oplossingen te vinden die economisch haalbaar zijn voor landbouwers. Om dit zo snel mogelijk te laten gebeuren, zijn meer investeringen nodig in onderzoek dat de fundamentele problemen echt aanpakt. Nog steeds wordt veel te veel overheidsgeld geïnvesteerd in onderzoek naar nieuwe gewasvariëteiten, veevoer en de toepassing van landbouwchemicaliën, die allemaal in het voordeel zijn van grote bedrijven.

Rotational grazing June 19th, 2022 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

While making farmer training videos, we always learn a lot from rural people. As we spend more days in the same village, farmers get to know us better and share interesting insights, allowing us to adjust and add depth to the video.

For a video on rotational grazing, we spent a week in Canrey Chico, in Ancash, Peru. It was a rich experience. Yet, the greatest insight came from a farmer researcher at the other side of the planet, in Australia.

Pastures need to rest so they can recuperate, but they can’t rest if livestock are grazing on them all the time. Overgrazing has become a problem in many parts of the world. With the changing climate, there is often less water available for pasture. So, in the video we say that now more than ever, grazing lands need to rest for the forage plants to recover.

A local farmer, Robert Balabarca, told us: “When we have an excess of animals in just one place, the next season the pasture will not grow back the way it should. It is less, and the grass lasts for less time.” This is indeed a sign of overgrazing, with consequences stretching into the following seasons.

As the days passed, we realized we could still not say exactly how one can know when a pasture has been sufficiently grazed.

When interviewing Delia Rodríguez on camera, she said: “In case the animals have grazed too much, the grass seed may all be eaten, and the grass takes longer to grow back. That is why we don’t want to overgraze.”

I remembered a webinar I attended during covid where a farmer talked about regenerative grazing, a system of managing grazing regimes in a way that plants are given the time needed to recover and store the most carbon in the soil. A few months ago, I also go to know André Leu, former director of IFOAM Organics International, who in the meantime had created a network organisation called Regeneration International. André runs his own cattle farm in Australia, so I decided to contact him and ask for advice.

When André wrote back, he shared an idea that was the missing part of our puzzle. We had not appreciated how grazing the above-ground part of the plant, the roots develop more slowly or may stop growing all together. This piece of scientific background information will surely help farmers as they decide when to move animals to a new paddock.

To curb global warming, we humans must store carbon in the soil, and for this we need as many active roots as possible. When plants absorb carbon from their air through photosynthesis, one third of it is released as sugars through the roots to feed soil microorganisms. These in turn supply nutrients to the plants. Well-managed pastures help soils to store carbon, retain water and nutrients.

At Agro-Insight, our videos combine the best of both worlds and merge scientific with farmer knowledge. In this case, we were fortunate to know a helpful scientist who is also a farmer himself.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Farming as a lifestyle

Mother and calf

Capturing carbon in our soils

Community and microbes

Soil for a living planet

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos with farmers like doña Delia and don Robert was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Vidal Rondån of the Mountain Institute for introducing us to the community.

Videos on how to improve livestock

See the many training videos on livestock hosted on the Access Agriculture video platform.

 

Rotatiebegrazing

Bij het maken van boerentrainingsvideo’s leren we altijd veel van de mensen op het platteland. Naarmate we meer dagen in hetzelfde dorp doorbrengen, leren de boeren ons beter kennen en delen ze interessante inzichten, waardoor we de video kunnen aanpassen en uitdiepen.

Voor een video over rotatiebegrazing brachten we een week door in Canrey Chico, in Ancash, Peru. Het was een rijke ervaring. Maar het grootste inzicht kwam van een boerenonderzoeker aan de andere kant van de planeet, in Australië.

Weiden moeten rusten zodat ze kunnen herstellen, maar ze kunnen niet rusten als er voortdurend vee op graast. Overbegrazing is in vele delen van de wereld een probleem geworden. Door het veranderende klimaat is er vaak minder water beschikbaar voor weiland. Daarom zeggen we in de video dat weidegronden nu meer dan ooit rust nodig hebben zodat de voedergewassen zich kunnen herstellen.

Een lokale boer, Robert Balabarca, vertelde ons: “Wanneer we een teveel aan dieren op Ă©Ă©n plaats hebben, groeit de weide het volgende seizoen niet meer zoals het zou moeten. Het is minder, en het gras gaat minder lang mee.” Dit is inderdaad een teken van overbegrazing, met gevolgen die zich tot in de volgende seizoenen uitstrekken.

Naarmate de dagen verstreken, beseften we dat we nog steeds niet precies konden zeggen hoe men kan weten wanneer een weide genoeg begraasd is.

Toen we Delia RodrĂ­guez voor de camera interviewden, zei ze: “Als de dieren te veel hebben gegraasd, kan het graszaad allemaal zijn opgegeten en duurt het langer voordat het gras weer aangroeit. Daarom willen we niet overbegrazen.”

Ik herinnerde me een webinar dat ik bijwoonde tijdens covid waar een boer sprak over regeneratieve begrazing, een systeem om begrazingsregimes zo te beheren dat planten de tijd krijgen die nodig is om zich te herstellen en de meeste koolstof in de bodem op te slaan. Een paar maanden geleden heb ik ook André Leu leren kennen, voormalig directeur van IFOAM Organics International, die intussen een netwerkorganisatie had opgericht onder de naam Regeneration International. André runt zijn eigen veehouderij in Australië, dus besloot ik contact met hem op te nemen en hem om advies te vragen.

Toen André terugschreef, deelde hij een idee dat het ontbrekende deel van onze puzzel vormde. We hadden niet begrepen dat door het grazen van het bovengrondse deel van de plant, de wortels zich langzamer ontwikkelen of zelfs helemaal stoppen met groeien. Dit stukje wetenschappelijke achtergrondinformatie zal boeren zeker helpen wanneer ze beslissen wanneer ze hun dieren naar een nieuwe weide moeten verplaatsen.

Om de opwarming van de aarde tegen te gaan, moeten wij mensen koolstof in de bodem opslaan, en daarvoor hebben we zoveel mogelijk actieve wortels nodig. Wanneer planten via fotosynthese koolstof uit de lucht opnemen, komt een derde daarvan als suikers via de wortels vrij om micro-organismen in de bodem te voeden. Deze leveren op hun beurt voedingsstoffen aan de planten. Goed beheerde weilanden helpen de bodem koolstof op te slaan en water en voedingsstoffen vast te houden.

Bij Agro-Insight combineren we in onze video’s het beste van twee werelden en combineren we wetenschappelijke kennis met boerenkennis. In dit geval hadden we het geluk een behulpzame wetenschapper te kennen die zelf ook boer is.

The times they are a changing April 17th, 2022 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Talking with my neighbour farmers in Belgium, they all wonder how they will manage this year, as the cost of chemical fertilizers has risen by 500%. They now pay 1 Euro per kilogram of fertilizer. The recent Russian invasion of Ukraine will have serious consequences on the global food supply as Russia is the world’s top exporter of nitrogen fertilizers and the second leading supplier of both potassic and phosphorous fertilizers. While farmers across the globe are known to be creative and adaptive, the changes required in the near future will be of a scale unseen before. The spike in fuel and fertilizer prices may be a fundamental trigger.

In Belgium, 2018 and 2019 were extremely hot and dry. While some farmers thought it was necessary to start looking into growing other crops, most farmers pumped up more groundwater to irrigate their maize or pasture to feed their animals, even with signs of depleting groundwater reserves, which also affected the vitality and survival of trees.

The covid crisis during the following two years affected global trade and made everyone in the food sector realize how much we have become dependent on imports, be it for food, feed or materials needed to process and package food. To be less dependent on soya bean imports, many farmers in Belgium started to grow their own legume fodder like lucerne, a shift promoted by European policies.

While an acute crisis often makes people see things more clearly, some changes in our environment have been unnoticed to the public for decades; only now alarm bells are starting to go off. The long-term use of agrochemicals in monocrop farming has had a devastating effect on our biodiversity. In the beekeepers’ association of my eldest brother Wim in Flanders, in northern Belgium, all members, including those who had spent a lifetime caring for bees, reported that 3 out of 4 colonies died last winter. Jos Kerkhofs, my beekeeper friend in Erpekom in eastern Belgium where I live, told me the same trend is seen among the members of his association. While local honey has become a rare commodity this time of the year, the wider consequences on society are seriously worrying, as 84% of our crop species depend on honey bees and wild pollinators.

All above examples are what one refers to as external costs. An external cost is a cost not included in the market price of the goods and services being produced, or a cost that is not borne by those who create it. We have been pushing our economies beyond what our planet can cope with, beyond the so-called planetary boundaries. And as we start to realize, the external costs of climate change, depleting natural resources such as groundwater and loss of biodiversity will need to be paid by society.

Media plays a big role in sensitising people about these matters. In Belgium, the number of radio programmes and news items on these matters has sharply risen the last few months. Recently, a spokesperson from the food industry said that 3 out of 5 of the main food companies considered closing their doors. Because of the rising fuel prices and costs of raw materials, they were unable to continue providing food to supermarkets at the same rock bottom prices. Unless supermarkets showed some flexibility and are ready to pay more, food companies will go bankrupt.

Is this the era when cheap food will come to an end because it is no longer feasible to ignore the external costs? It definitely forces policy-makers, farmers and others in the food system to make drastic decisions and increasingly embrace natural farming, organic farming, home gardening, short food supply chains, and less processed food, all with full attention to caring for our environment and for our farmers. For sure, the sharp rise in costs of chemical fertilizer and other supplies will encourage more farmers across the globe to experiment with organic and ecological alternatives, like biofertilizers, organic growth promoters, intercropping, cover crops and mulch.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Stuck in the middle

Damaging the soil and our health with chemical reductionism

Reviving soils

Soil for a living planet

Out of space

Ignoring signs from nature

Home delivery of organic produce

When local authorities support agroecology

Watch the videos on Access Agriculture

Human urine as fertilizer

Turning fish waste into fertiliser

Organic biofertilizer in liquid and solid form

Organic growth promoter for crops

Healthier crops with good micro-organisms

Good microbes for plants and soil

Coir pith

The wonder of earthworms

Making a vermicompost bed

Vermiwash: an organic tonic for crops

Mulch for a better soil and crop

Compost from rice straw

 

De tijden veranderen

Als ik met mijn buurboeren in BelgiĂ« praat, vragen zij zich allemaal af hoe zij het dit jaar zullen redden, nu de kosten van kunstmest met 500% zijn gestegen. Ze betalen nu 1 euro per kilo kunstmest. De recente Russische inval in OekraĂŻne zal ernstige gevolgen hebben voor de mondiale voedselvoorziening, aangezien Rusland ‘s werelds grootste exporteur van stikstofhoudende meststoffen is en de op Ă©Ă©n na grootste leverancier van zowel kaliumhoudende als fosforhoudende meststoffen. Hoewel landbouwers over de hele wereld bekend staan om hun creativiteit en aanpassingsvermogen, zullen de veranderingen die in de nabije toekomst nodig zullen zijn, van een nooit eerder geziene omvang zijn. De sterke stijging van de brandstof- en meststofprijzen kan een fundamentele trigger zijn.

In België waren 2018 en 2019 extreem warm en droog. Terwijl sommige boeren het nodig vonden om te gaan kijken naar het verbouwen van andere gewassen, pompten de meeste boeren meer grondwater op om hun maïs of grasland te irrigeren om hun dieren te voeden, zelfs met tekenen van uitputting van de grondwaterreserves, wat ook de vitaliteit en het overleven van bomen aantastte.

De covid crisis in de daaropvolgende twee jaar beïnvloedde de wereldhandel en deed iedereen in de voedingssector beseffen hoezeer we afhankelijk zijn geworden van invoer, of het nu gaat om voedsel, diervoeder of materialen die nodig zijn om voedsel te verwerken en te verpakken. Om minder afhankelijk te zijn van de invoer van sojabonen, zijn veel boeren in België begonnen met het verbouwen van hun eigen vlinderbloemige voedergewassen zoals luzerne, een verschuiving die werd gestimuleerd door Europees beleid.

Terwijl een acute crisis de mensen vaak dingen duidelijker doet inzien, zijn sommige veranderingen in ons milieu decennialang onopgemerkt gebleven voor het publiek; nu pas beginnen de alarmbellen te rinkelen. Het langdurige gebruik van landbouwchemicaliën in de landbouw met monoculturen heeft een verwoestend effect gehad op onze biodiversiteit. In de imkervereniging van mijn oudste broer Wim in Vlaanderen, in het noorden van België, meldden alle leden, ook zij die hun hele leven voor bijen hadden gezorgd, dat 3 van de 4 kolonies vorige winter waren gestorven. Jos Kerkhofs, mijn bevriende imker in Erpekom in Oost-België, waar ik woon, vertelde me dat dezelfde tendens wordt waargenomen bij de leden van zijn vereniging. Terwijl lokale honing in deze tijd van het jaar een schaars goed is geworden, zijn de bredere gevolgen voor de samenleving ernstig zorgwekkend, aangezien 84% van onze gewassen afhankelijk is van bijen en wilde bestuivers.

Alle bovenstaande voorbeelden zijn wat men noemt externe kosten. Externe kosten zijn kosten die niet zijn opgenomen in de marktprijs van de geproduceerde goederen en diensten, of kosten die niet worden gedragen door degenen die ze veroorzaken. Wij hebben onze economieën verder gedreven dan wat onze planeet aankan, voorbij de zogenaamde planetaire grenzen. En naarmate we ons dat beginnen te realiseren, zullen de externe kosten van de klimaatverandering, de uitputting van natuurlijke hulpbronnen zoals grondwater en het verlies van biodiversiteit door de samenleving moeten worden betaald.

De media spelen een grote rol bij het sensibiliseren van mensen over deze zaken. In BelgiĂ« is het aantal radioprogramma’s en nieuwsberichten over deze kwesties de laatste maanden sterk toegenomen. Onlangs zei een woordvoerder van de voedingsindustrie dat 3 van de 5 belangrijkste voedingsbedrijven overwegen hun deuren te sluiten. Door de stijgende brandstofprijzen en grondstofkosten konden zij niet tegen dezelfde bodemprijzen levensmiddelen aan de supermarkten blijven leveren. Tenzij de supermarkten enige flexibiliteit aan de dag leggen en bereid zijn meer te betalen, zullen de levensmiddelenbedrijven failliet gaan.

Is dit het tijdperk waarin goedkoop voedsel tot een einde zal komen omdat het niet langer haalbaar is de externe kosten te negeren? Het dwingt beleidsmakers, boeren en anderen in het voedselsysteem zeker om drastische beslissingen te nemen en steeds meer te kiezen voor natuurlijke landbouw, biologische landbouw, moestuinieren, korte voedselvoorzieningsketens en minder bewerkt voedsel, allemaal met de volle aandacht voor de zorg voor ons milieu en voor onze boeren. Zeker is dat de sterk stijgende kosten van kunstmest en andere benodigdheden meer boeren over de hele wereld zullen aanmoedigen om te experimenteren met biologische en ecologische alternatieven, zoals bio-meststoffen, biologische groeistimulatoren, intercropping, bodembedekkers en mulch.

Soil for a living planet January 30th, 2022 by

In a refreshingly optimistic book, The Soil Will Save Us, Kristin Ohlson explains how agriculture could stop emitting carbon, and instead remove it from the air and place it in the soil.

Soil life is complex. A teaspoon of soil may harbor between one and seven billion living things. Microorganisms like fungi and bacteria give mineral nutrients to plants in exchange for carbon-rich sugars. Predatory protozoa and nematodes (worms) then eat the fungi and bacteria, releasing the nutrients from their bodies back to the soil.

When people add chemical fertilizer to the soil, these living things die, essentially starved to death as the plants no longer need to interact with them. The plants become dependent on chemical fertilizer. Reading this in Ohlson’s book reminded me of farmers in Honduras and around the world, who have been telling me for over 30 years that soil quickly “becomes used to,” or “accustomed” to chemical fertilizers. Local knowledge is often ahead of the science.

When soil is plowed, it loses some of its carbon. The plow lets in air that binds with the carbon to become C02, which rises into the atmosphere. Plowed soil is broken, and more prone to erosion than natural, plant-covered earth. One of the many people Ohlson interviewed for her book, innovative North Dakota farmer Gabe Brown, grows a biodiverse mix of cover crops, including grasses and legumes. But instead of harvesting these crops, Brown lets his cows graze on them. Then he drills corn (maize) or other cash crops into the soil, instead of plowing it. No chemical fertilizers are applied. This soil is productive, while saving labor and expense, and absorbing carbon instead of giving it off. This healthy soil holds more water than plowed soil, so the crops resist droughts. Brown developed this system working with Innovative scientists like Jay Furhrer and Kristine Nichols of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), an example of the power of collaborative research.

Brown is not the only farmer trying to conserve the soil, but when Ohlson was writing about a decade ago, only 4.3% of US farmland was enrolled in any kind of government land conservation program.

Encouraging more farmers to conserve the soil will require public universities to do more research on no-till farming i.e., forsaking the plow and encouraging cover crops and livestock grazing to boost soil fertility. Universities have to stop accepting grants from companies that produce the chemical fertilizer, the pesticides and the genetically modified crop seeds that tolerate them. Accepting corporate money diverts university research into chemical farming, even though taxpayers still pay the faculty members’ salaries and society pays the price for soils becoming unproductive in the long-term.

Fortunately, there is much that we can all do at home, in gardens, parks and even lawns. The biggest irrigated crop in the United States is not maize, but lawns, which take up three times as much space as corn. Lawns can be managed without chemicals: fertilized with compost, while clover and other legumes can be planted among the grass to improve the soil. Families can make compost at home and fertilize the garden with it. City parks can also sequester carbon. The Battery Park in Manhattan is fertilized entirely with compost and compost tea (a liquid compost).

I was encouraged by this book. Agriculture could be the solution to climate change, and even help to cool the planet, rather than being a major contributor to the problem.

Get involved

In 2015, just after Ohlson’s book was published, some 60 people from 21 countries met in Costa Rica and formed Regenerative Agriculture, an international movement united around a common goal: to reverse global warming and end world hunger by facilitating and accelerating the global transition to regenerative agriculture and land management. Click here to find a partner organization in your area.

Further reading

Ohlson, Kristin 2014 The Soil Will Save Us: How Scientists, Farmers and Foodies Are Healing the Soil to Save the Planet. New York: Rodale. 242 pp.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Hügelkultur

Capturing carbon in our soils

Community and microbes

Living Soil: A film review

A revolution for our soil

Out of space

Videos on how to improve the soil

See some of the many videos on soil management hosted by Access Agriculture.

 

Capturing carbon in our soils December 12th, 2021 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Participants at the recent climate summit in Glasgow (COP26) spent considerable energy discussing about ways to further reduce carbon emissions and improve regulation of carbon markets. For the first time in history, fossil fuels have been officially recognised as the main cause of heating our planet. While investments in renewable energy have been long overdue, agriculture continues to be a net polluter and contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Yet, with some relatively modest investment agriculture could even become a net absorber of GHGs.

Few people realise that more carbon can be captured by soils than what is stored in the wood of trees. So, paying attention to what we do with our soils is as important as protecting our forests.

A high level of organic matter is the main indicator of soil health, determining the level of resilience of farms to cope with the effects of disruption in the climate. Carbon-rich soils are essential to secure future food production, because carbon feeds soil microorganisms and helps soils to retain water and nutrients, which are all essential for growing plants.

Adding compost to soils is one common way of enriching the soil with carbon. When plants die and decompose, the living organisms of the soil, such as bacteria, fungi or earthworms, transform the plants into forms of organic matter that the earth can absorb. But also living plants transfer lots of carbon from the air to the soil in a remarkable way. In the daytime, plants absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air through the pores of their leaves. During photosynthesis, plants use water and sunlight to turn the carbon into leaves, stems, seeds and roots. However, as one third of the CO2 captured is released as sugars by plant roots to the soil, one may wonder why the plants are “leaking”.

Plants, like all living creatures, cannot live in isolation; they need others to survive. The liquid sugars released by plant roots are part of a symbiotic relationship between mycorrhizal fungi and 90% of all plants, an arrangement that has developed over the past 420 million years. In fact, plants cannot survive without these soil fungi and vice versa.

Mycorrhizal fungi cannot live without a host plant and, in exchange for the plant’s sugar, the fungi will absorb and transport nutrients and water back to its host.  For every cubic meter of soil, these fungi will send out as much as 20,000 km of fungal threads, also called hyphae, so that they infiltrate every area of soil.  Fungi can access nutrients and water unavailable to the larger plant roots.

Fungi can also use their acids to release nutrients from soils and even rocks — transforming rock minerals into formats that the plant can use. The complexity of interactions between plants and soil organisms goes even further. Certain nutrients can only be extracted from soils by bacteria and fungi will exchange sugar for the nutrients requested by the plant in a complex symbiotic exchange.

Studies have shown that soils under mature, perennial crops contain more available nutrients than soils treated with agricultural chemicals, which kill soil microbes, resulting in the net loss of soil carbon. Policies that promote agroecology, regenerative farming and organic agriculture are therefore directly contributing to soil carbon sequestration and hence help to fight against climate change. But more can be done.

It has long been thought that most of the soil carbon was contained in the top 30 centimetres of the soil in the form of the organic matter in humus. In 1996, Dr. Sara Wright discovered in the USA that soils contain large amounts of carbon up to more than a meter deep. Carbon is stored in the form of glomalin, a highly persistent protein produced by mycorrhizal fungi. As the mycorrhizal fungi go deeper into the soil to mine nutrients and water for the plant, they deposit more and more carbon in the form of glomalin. The more mature this relationship is between plant and microbe the more volume of soil is accessed on behalf of the plant and the better the crop will produce and be able to cope with harsh weather conditions.

Ploughing destroys soil organic matter by oxidation and releases much of the carbon stored in the top soil as CO2, which finds its way to the atmosphere. Ploughing also depletes the micro-organisms in the soil. Reduced tillage and ensuring more permanent soil coverage by plants is therefore crucial to build up a healthy soil life and keep carbon stored in the soil.

Permanent pasture soils with healthy microbial life have been increasing the amount of carbon that they sequester beneath the grasses each year. Practices such as agroforestry and establishing field hedges are other low-cost strategies that can help turn the tide of our warming planet.

In fact, an annual increase of soil organic carbon by 0.4% would neutralise the human-caused emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. This scientific insight was at the basis of the “4 per 1000” initiative to which many governments, research institutes, civil society and companies already subscribed during the climate summit in Paris in 2015. While the European Green Deal has set a target to be climate-neutral by 2050, the increasing natural calamities we witness year after year shows us that we have no more time to lose.

Illustration credit

Mycorrhiza by Nefronus, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=80931388

Read more

The Liquid Carbon Pathway (LCP): http://www.carbon-drawdown.com/liquid-carbon-pathway.html

The 4 per 1000 Initiative: https://www.4p1000.org/

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Community and microbes

Experiments with trees

From Uniformity to Diversity

Living Soil: A film review

Inspiring knowledge platforms

Access Agriculture: https://www.accessagriculture.org is a specialised video platform with freely downloadable farmer training videos on ecological farming with a focus on the Global South.

EcoAgtube: https://www.ecoagtube.org is the alternative to Youtube where anyone from across the globe can upload their own videos related to ecological farming and circular economy.

 

Koolstof vastleggen in onze bodem

Deelnemers aan de recente klimaattop in Glasgow (COP26) besteedden veel energie aan het bespreken van manieren om de koolstofemissies verder te verminderen en de regulering van koolstofmarkten te verbeteren. Voor het eerst in de geschiedenis zijn fossiele brandstoffen officieel erkend als de belangrijkste oorzaak van de opwarming van onze planeet. Hoewel investeringen in hernieuwbare energie al lang op zich lieten wachten, blijft de landbouw een netto vervuiler en bijdrager aan de uitstoot van broeikasgassen (BKG). Maar met relatief bescheiden investeringen zou de landbouw zelfs een netto absorbeerder van broeikasgassen kunnen worden.

Weinig mensen realiseren zich dat er meer koolstof door de bodem kan worden vastgelegd dan er in het hout van bomen wordt opgeslagen. Aandacht besteden aan wat we met onze bodem doen, is dus net zo belangrijk als het beschermen van onze bossen.

Een hoog gehalte aan organische stof is de belangrijkste indicator voor de gezondheid van de bodem en bepaalt de mate van veerkracht van bedrijven om de effecten van verstoringen in het klimaat het hoofd te bieden. Koolstofrijke bodems zijn essentieel om de toekomstige voedselproductie veilig te stellen, omdat koolstof de bodemmicro-organismen voedt en de bodem helpt om water en voedingsstoffen vast te houden, die allemaal essentieel zijn voor het kweken van planten.

Het toevoegen van compost aan de bodem is een veelgebruikte manier om de bodem met koolstof te verrijken. Wanneer planten afsterven en uiteenvallen, transformeren de levende organismen van de bodem, zoals bacteriĂ«n, schimmels en regenwormen, ze in vormen van organisch materiaal dat de aarde kan opnemen. Maar ook levende planten brengen op opmerkelijke wijze veel koolstof uit de lucht naar de bodem. Overdag nemen planten koolstofdioxide (CO2) op uit de lucht via de poriĂ«n van hun bladeren. Tijdens de fotosynthese gebruiken planten water en zonlicht om de koolstof om te zetten in bladeren, stengels en wortels. Echter, aangezien een derde van de opgevangen CO2 als suikers door plantenwortels aan de bodem wordt afgegeven, kan men zich afvragen waarom de planten “lekken”.

Planten, zoals alle levende wezens, kunnen niet geĂŻsoleerd leven; ze hebben anderen nodig om te overleven. De vloeibare suikers die door plantenwortels vrijkomen, maken deel uit van een symbiotische relatie tussen mycorrhiza-schimmels en 90% van alle planten, een arrangement dat zich in de afgelopen 420 miljoen jaar heeft ontwikkeld. Sterker nog, planten kunnen niet zonder deze bodemschimmels en vice versa.

Mycorrhiza-schimmels kunnen niet leven zonder een waardplant en in ruil voor de suiker van de plant zullen de schimmels voedingsstoffen en water opnemen en terugvoeren naar de gastheer. Voor elke kubieke meter grond sturen deze schimmels maar liefst 20.000 km schimmeldraden, ook wel hyfen genoemd, uit, zodat ze in elk gebied van de bodem infiltreren. Schimmels hebben toegang tot voedingsstoffen en water die niet beschikbaar zijn voor de grotere plantenwortels.

Schimmels kunnen hun zuren ook gebruiken om voedingsstoffen uit de bodem en zelfs uit rotsen vrij te maken, waardoor gesteentemineralen worden omgezet in nutrienten die de plant kan gebruiken. De complexiteit van interacties tussen planten en bodemorganismen gaat nog verder. Bepaalde voedingsstoffen kunnen alleen door bacteriën uit de bodem worden gehaald en schimmels wisselen suiker uit voor de voedingsstoffen die de plant nodig heeft in een complexe symbiotische uitwisseling.

Studies hebben aangetoond dat bodems onder volgroeide, meerjarige gewassen meer beschikbare voedingsstoffen bevatten dan bodems die zijn behandeld met landbouwchemicaliĂ«n, die bodemmicroben doden, wat resulteert in het netto verlies van bodemkoolstof. Beleid dat agro-ecologie, regeneratieve landbouw en biologische landbouw bevordert, draagt ​​daarom rechtstreeks bij aan de vastlegging van koolstof in de bodem en helpt zo de klimaatverandering tegen te gaan. Maar er kan meer gedaan worden.

Lange tijd werd gedacht dat de meeste bodemkoolstof zich in de bovenste 30 centimeter van de bodem bevond in de vorm van de organische stof in humus. In 1996 ontdekte Dr. Sara Wright in de VS dat bodems grote hoeveelheden koolstof bevatten tot meer dan een meter diep. Koolstof wordt opgeslagen in de vorm van glomaline, een zeer persistent eiwit dat wordt geproduceerd door mycorrhiza-schimmels. Naarmate de mycorrhiza-schimmels dieper de grond in gaan om voedingsstoffen en water voor de plant te ontginnen, zetten ze steeds meer koolstof af in de vorm van glomaline. Hoe volwassener deze relatie tussen plant en microbe is, hoe meer grond er voor de plant wordt aangesproken en hoe beter het gewas zal produceren en bestand is tegen barre weersomstandigheden.

Ploegen vernietigt organisch bodemmateriaal door oxidatie en geeft veel van de koolstof die in de bovenste bodem is opgeslagen vrij als CO2, dat zijn weg naar de atmosfeer vindt. Ploegen put ook de micro-organismen in de bodem uit. Minder grondbewerking en zorgen voor een meer permanente bodembedekking door planten is daarom cruciaal om een ​​gezond bodemleven op te bouwen en koolstof in de bodem vast te houden.

Bodems van blijvend grasland met gezond microbieel leven verhogen de hoeveelheid koolstof die ze elk jaar onder de grassen vastleggen. Praktijken zoals agroforestry en het aanleggen van heggen en houtkanten zijn andere goedkope strategieën die kunnen helpen het tij van onze opwarmende planeet te keren.

In feite zou een jaarlijkse toename van de organische koolstof in de bodem met 0,4% de door de mens veroorzaakte uitstoot van CO2 in de atmosfeer kunnen neutraliseren. Dit wetenschappelijke inzicht lag aan de basis van het “4 per 1000”-initiatief waar veel overheden, onderzoeksinstituten, het maatschappelijk middenveld en bedrijven al op intekenden tijdens de klimaattop in Parijs in 2015. Terwijl de Europese Green Deal een doelstelling heeft klimaat-neutraal te zijn tegen 2050, laten de toenemende natuurrampen waar we jaar na jaar getuige van zijn, ons zien dat we geen tijd meer te verliezen hebben.

Design by Olean webdesign