WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Pheromone traps are social March 26th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Farmers like insecticides because they are quick, easy to use, and fairly cheap, especially if you ignore the health risks.

Fortunately, alternatives are emerging around the world. Entomologists are developing traps made of pheromones, the smells that guide insects to attack, or congregate or to mate. Each species has its own sex pheromone, which researchers can isolate and synthesize. Insects are so attracted to sex pheromones that they can even be used to make traps.

I had seen pheromone traps before, on small farms in Nepal, so I was pleased to see two varieties of pheromone traps in Bolivia.

Paul and Marcella and I were filming a video for farmers on the potato tuber moth, a pest that gets into potatoes in the field and in storage. Given enough time, the larvae of the little tuber moths will eat a potato into a soggy mass of frass.

We visited two farms with Juan Almanza, a talented agronomist who is helping farmers try pheromone traps, among other innovations.

A little piece of rubber is impregnated with the sex pheromone that attracts the male tuber moth. The rubber is hung from a wire inside a plastic trap. One type of trap is like a funnel, where the moths can fly in, but can’t get out again. The males are attracted to the smell of a receptive female, but are then locked in a trap with no escape. They never mate, and so the females cannot lay eggs.

Farmers Pastor Veizaga and Irene Claros showed us traps they had made at home, using an old bottle of cooking oil. The bottle is filled partway with water and detergent. The moth flies around the bait until it stumbles into the detergent water, and dies.

All of the farmers we met were impressed with these simple traps and how many moths they killed. A few of these safe, inexpensive traps, hanging in a potato storage area, could be part of the solution to protecting the potato, loved around the world by people and by moths alike. The pheromone trap could give the farmers a chance to outsmart the moths, without insecticides. But the farmers can’t adopt pheromone traps on their own; it has to be a social effort.

Some ten years previously, pheromone baits were distributed to anyone in Colomi who wanted one. As Juan Almanza explained to me, the mayor’s office announced on the radio that people would receive bait if they took an empty plastic jug to the plant clinic, which operated every Thursday at the weekly fair in the municipal market. Oscar Díaz, who then ran the plant clinic for Proinpa, gave pheromone bait, valued at 25 Bs. (about $3.60), to hundreds of people. Farmers made the traps and used them for years. It may take five years or more for the pheromone to be exhausted from the bait.

Now, only a handful of households in Colomi still use the traps. But most farmers there do spray agrochemicals. Agrochemicals and their alternatives compete in an unfair contest, due in part to policy failure and profit motive. If pesticide shops all closed and farmers did not know where to buy more insecticide, its use would fall off quickly.

Had the municipal government periodically sold pheromone bait to farmers, they might still be making and using the traps.

During Covid, we all learned about supply chains. Sometimes, appropriate tools for agroecology, like pheromone traps, also rely on supplies from outside the farm community.  Manufacturers, distributors, and local government can all be part of this supply chain. Farmers can’t do it on their own.

Acknowledgment

Juan Almanza works for the Proinpa Foundation. He and Paul Van Mele read and commented on a previous version of this story.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Don’t eat the peals

The best knowledge is local and scientific

LAS TRAMPAS DE FEROMONAS SON SOCIALES

Jeff Bentley, 26 de marzo del 2023

A los agricultores les gustan los insecticidas porque son r√°pidos, f√°ciles de usar y bastante baratos, sobre todo si se ignoran los riesgos para la salud.

Afortunadamente, están surgiendo alternativas en todo el mundo. Los entomólogos están desarrollando trampas de feromonas, los olores que guían a los insectos para atacar, congregarse o aparearse. Cada especie tiene su propia feromona sexual, que los investigadores pueden aislar y sintetizar. Los insectos se sienten tan atraídos por las feromonas sexuales que se los puede usar para hacer trampas.

Yo había visto trampas de feromonas antes, usadas en la agricultura familiar en Nepal, así que me alegró ver dos variedades de trampas de feromonas en Bolivia.

Paul, Marcella y yo est√°bamos filmando un v√≠deo para agricultores sobre la polilla de la papa, una plaga que se mete en las papas en el campo y en almac√©n. Con el suficiente tiempo, las larvas de la peque√Īa polilla de la papa se comen una papa hasta convertirla en una masa de excremento.

Visitamos dos familias con Juan Almanza, un agrónomo de talento que está ayudando a los agricultores a probar trampas de feromonas, entre otras innovaciones.

Se impregna un trocito de goma con la feromona sexual que atrae al macho de la polilla de la papa. La goma se cuelga de un alambre dentro de una trampa de plástico. Un tipo de trampa es como un embudo, donde las polillas pueden entrar volando, pero no pueden salir. Los machos se sienten atraídos por el olor de una hembra receptiva, pero entonces quedan encerrados en una trampa sin salida. Nunca se aparean, así que las hembras no pueden poner huevos.

Agricultores Pastor Veizaga e Irene Claros nos ense√Īaron trampas que hab√≠an hecho en casa, usando un viejo bid√≥n de aceite de cocina. La botella se llena hasta la mitad con agua y detergente. La polilla vuela alrededor del cebo hasta que tropieza con el agua del detergente y muere.

Todos los agricultores que conocimos quedaron impresionados con estas sencillas trampas y con la cantidad de polillas que mataban. Unas pocas de estas trampas seguras y baratas, colgadas en un almac√©n de papas, podr√≠an ser parte de la soluci√≥n para proteger la papa, amada en todo el mundo tanto por la gente como por las polillas. La trampa de feromonas podr√≠a dar a los agricultores la oportunidad de enga√Īar a las polillas, sin insecticidas. Pero los agricultores no pueden adoptar las trampas de feromonas por s√≠ solos; tiene que ser un esfuerzo social.

Hace unos diez a√Īos, en Colomi se distribuyeron cebos de feromonas a todos que quer√≠an tener uno. Seg√ļn Juan Almanza me explic√≥, la alcald√≠a anunciaba por la radio que la gente recibir√≠a cebos si llevaba un bid√≥n de pl√°stico vac√≠a a la cl√≠nica de plantas, que funcionaba todos los jueves en la feria semanal, en el mercado municipal. Oscar D√≠az, que entonces dirig√≠a la cl√≠nica de plantas de Proinpa, entreg√≥ cebos de feromonas, valorados en 25 Bs. (unos $3,60), a cientos de personas. Los agricultores fabricaron las trampas y las usaron durante a√Īos. El cebo puede mantener su feromona durante unos cinco a√Īos o m√°s antes de que se agote.

Ahora, pocos hogares de Colomi siguen usando las trampas. Pero la mayoría de los agricultores si fumigan agroquímicos. Los agroquímicos y sus alternativas compiten en una competencia desleal, debida en parte al fracaso de las políticas y los intereses de lucro. Si todas las tiendas de plaguicidas cerraran sus puertas y los agricultores no supieran dónde comprar más insecticida, su uso caería rápidamente.

Si la alcaldía hubiera vendido periódicamente cebos con feromonas a los agricultores, quizá seguirían haciendo y usando las trampas.

Durante Covid, todos aprendimos acerca de las cadenas de suministro. A veces, las herramientas adecuadas para la agroecología, como las trampas de feromonas, también dependen de insumos externos a la comunidad agrícola.  Los fabricantes, los distribuidores y la administración local pueden formar parte de esta cadena de suministro. Los agricultores no pueden hacerlo solos.

Agradecimiento

Juan Almanza trabaja para la Fundaci√≥n Proinpa. √Čl y Paul Van Mele leyeron y comentaron sobre una versi√≥n previa de esta historia.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

No te comas las c√°scaras

El mejor conocimiento es local y científico

Shopping with mom February 12th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Shopping can not only be fun, but healthy and educational, as Paul and Marcella and I learned recently while filming a video in Cochabamba, Bolivia.

We visited a stall run by Laura Guzmán, who we have met in a previous blog story. Laura’s stall is so busy that her brother and a cousin help out. They sell the family’s own produce, some from the neighbors, and some they buy wholesale.

The market is clean and open to the light and air. All of the stalls neatly display their vegetables, grains and flowers. While Marcella films, Paul and I stand to one side, keeping out of the shot. Paul is quick to observe that Laura holds up each package of vegetables, explaining them to her customers. One pair of women listen attentively, and then buy several packages before moving on to another stall.

Paul reminds me that we need to interview consumers for this video on selling organic produce, so we approach the two shoppers. As in Ecuador, when we filmed consumers in the market, I was pleasantly surprised how strangers can be quite happy to appear on an educational video.

One of the women, Sonia Pinedo, spoke with confidence into the camera, explaining how she always looks for organic produce. ‚ÄúOrganic vegetables are important, because they are not contaminated and they are good for your health.‚ÄĚ

‚ÄúAnd now you can interview my daughter,‚ÄĚ Sonia said, nudging the young woman next to her.

Her daughter, 21-year-old university student, Lorena Quispe, spoke about how important it was to engage young consumers, teaching them to demand chemical-free food. She pointed out that if youth start eating right when they are young, they will not only live longer, but when they reach 60, they will still be healthy, and able to enjoy life. Remarkably, Lorena also pointed out that consumers play a role supporting organic farmers. She had clearly understood that choosing good food also builds communities.

Food shopping is often a way for parents to spend time with their children, and to pass on knowledge about food and healthy living, so that the kids grow up to be thoughtful young adults.

Watch a related video

Creating agroecological markets

DE COMPRAS CON MAM√Ā

Jeff Bentley, 5 de febrero del 2023

Ir de compras no sólo puede ser divertido, sino también saludable y educativo, como Paul, Marcella y yo aprendimos hace poco mientras grabábamos un video en Cochabamba, Bolivia.

Visitamos un puesto de ventas de Laura Guzm√°n, a quien ya conocimos en una historia anterior del blog. El puesto de Laura est√° tan concurrido que su hermano y un primo la ayudan. Venden los productos de la familia, algunos de los vecinos y otros que compran al por mayor.

El mercado est√° limpio y abierto a la luz y al aire. Todos los puestos exponen con esmero sus verduras, cereales y flores. Mientras Marcella filma, Paul y yo nos quedamos a un lado, fuera del plano. Paul no tarda en observar que Laura sostiene en alto cada paquete de verduras, explic√°ndoselas a sus clientes. Un par de mujeres escuchan atentamente y compran varios paquetes antes de pasar a otro puesto.

Paul me recuerda que tenemos que entrevistar a los consumidores para este video sobre la venta de productos ecológicos, así que nos acercamos a las dos compradoras. Al igual que en Ecuador, cuando filmamos a los consumidores en el mercado, me sorprendió gratamente que a pesar de que no nos conocen, están dispuestos a salir en un video educativo.

Una de las mujeres, Sonia Pinedo, habla con confianza a la c√°mara y explica que siempre busca productos ecol√≥gicos. “Las verduras ecol√≥gicas son importantes, porque no est√°n contaminadas y son buenas para la salud”.

“Y ahora puedes entrevistar a mi hija”, dijo Sonia, dando un codazo a la joven que estaba a su lado.

Su hija, Lorena Quispe, una estudiante universitaria de 21 a√Īos, habl√≥ de la importancia de involucrar a los j√≥venes consumidores, ense√Ī√°ndoles a exigir alimentos libres de productos qu√≠micos. Se√Īal√≥ que, si los j√≥venes empiezan a comer bien de peque√Īos, no s√≥lo vivir√°n m√°s, sino que cuando lleguen a los 60 seguir√°n estando sanos y podr√°n disfrutar de la vida. Sorprendentemente, Lorena tambi√©n se√Īal√≥ que los consumidores juegan un papel de apoyo a los agricultores ecol√≥gicos. Hab√≠a comprendido claramente que elegir buenos alimentos tambi√©n construye comunidades.

La compra de alimentos suele ser una forma de que los padres pasen tiempo con sus hijos y les transmitan conocimientos sobre alimentaci√≥n y vida sana, para que los ni√Īos se conviertan en j√≥venes adultos pensativos.

Vea un video relacionado

Creando ferias agroecológicas

A young lawyer comes home to farm January 29th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Laura Guzmán grew up on a small farm on the edge of the city of Cochabamba, went to university, graduated with a law degree, and then left home. She was working in La Paz, Bolivia’s unofficial capital city, and doing well. Her work with a land reform agency involved a lot of field work, and on one trip she filled up her water bottle in a stream, unaware that it was contaminated from a mine upstream. Laura became very ill, and her doctor advised her that she was on the verge of developing stomach cancer. He advised her to try to avoid food produced with agrochemicals, as she needed to be more careful with her health.

On Laura’s occasional weekend visits home, she would help her mom, who had recently become certified to grow organic vegetables. Laura began to take a few vegetables back to her apartment in La Paz. She noticed that they lasted a lot longer. A conventionally-grown tomato from the market might last for five days, while an organic tomato from home would last at least two weeks. She took this as a sign that agroecological produce was healthier.

Laura eventually left her job and returned home. She began to get involved in the farm work, and loved it, especially the calm feeling she got when she worked out-doors with the plants. In 2020, she took a training from Agrecol Andes, a local NGO, to become a certified organic farmer herself, and joined her mother’s group of agroecological farmers.

Paul and Marcella and I met Laura recently at her home, where she was helping the group, mostly women, package their produce for a home delivery service called BolSaludable: from ‚Äúbolsa‚ÄĚ (bag) and ‚Äúsaludable‚ÄĚ (healthy).

On Sundays, Laura also sells her produce at an open air market. She wins over her customers one at a time. She tells them that her vegetables cost a little more, because they are free of chemicals. Some customers don‚Äôt care, but some come back the following week and say that they read on the Internet that pesticide use is quite high in Bolivia (especially on tomatoes). ‚ÄúWe are taking poison home!‚ÄĚ one alarmed customer told her.

At the Sunday market, Laura sells some of her family‚Äôs produce, some from neighbors, and some healthy produce that she buys from wholesalers. For example, the large squash, called ‚Äúzapallo‚ÄĚ locally, is popular for making soup in Bolivia. Organic zapallo is not available, but few chemicals are used in this crop, and so Laura buys it to sell to her customers. Business is so brisk that Laura¬īs brother and a cousin also help at their stand.

Now 30-years-old, Laura is so happy with her work that she encourages other young people to follow her example, ‚Äúbecause with ecological farming you not only care for yourself, you care for the earth, you care for the environment. And what‚Äôs more, you care for the future generations.‚ÄĚ

Related Agro-Insight blog

Choosing to farm

UNA JOVEN ABOGADA VUELVE A CASA, A SEMBRAR SALUD

Por Jeff Bentley, 29 enero 2023

Laura Guzm√°n creci√≥ en una peque√Īa granja a las afueras de Cochabamba, fue a la universidad, se gradu√≥ en derecho y se march√≥ de casa. Trabajaba en La Paz, la capital no oficial de Bolivia, y le iba bien. Trabajaba con una agencia de reforma agraria, que involucraba muchas salidas al campo. En un viaje llen√≥ su botella de agua en una vertiente, sin saber que estaba contaminada por una mina situada r√≠o arriba. Laura se puso muy enferma y su m√©dico le advirti√≥ de que estaba a punto de desarrollar un c√°ncer de est√≥mago. Le aconsej√≥ que evitara los alimentos producidos con agroqu√≠micos, ya que deb√≠a ser m√°s cuidadosa con su salud.

En sus visitas ocasionales a casa los fines de semana, Laura ayudaba a su madre, que acababa de certificarse para cultivar verduras ecol√≥gicas. Laura empez√≥ a llevarse algunas verduras a su departamento en La Paz. Se dio cuenta de que duraban mucho m√°s. Un tomate convencional del mercado pod√≠a durar cinco d√≠as, mientras que un tomate ecol√≥gico de casa duraba al menos dos semanas. Lo interpret√≥ como una se√Īal de que los productos agroecol√≥gicos eran m√°s sanos.

Laura dejó su trabajo y volvió a casa. Empezó a involucrarse en el trabajo de la granja, y le encantó, especialmente la sensación de calma que tiene cuando trabaja al aire libre con las plantas. En 2020, recibió formación de Agrecol Andes, una ONG local, para convertirse en agricultora ecológica certificada, y se unió al grupo de agricultores agroecológicos de su madre.

Paul, Marcella y yo conocimos a Laura hace poco en su casa, donde ayudaba al grupo de agricultoras, en su mayor√≠a mujeres, a empaquetar sus productos para un servicio de entrega a domicilio llamado BolSaludable: de “bolsa” y “saludable”.

Los domingos, Laura tambi√©n vende sus productos en un mercado al aire libre. Se gana a sus clientes de uno en uno. Les dice que sus verduras cuestan un poco m√°s porque no tienen productos qu√≠micos. A algunos clientes les da igual, pero otros vuelven a la semana siguiente y dicen que han le√≠do en Internet que el uso de plaguicidas es bastante elevado en Bolivia (sobre todo en los tomates). “Nos llevamos veneno a casa”, le dijo un cliente alarmado.

En el mercado de los domingos, Laura vende algunos productos de su familia, otros de los vecinos y otros sanos que compra a mayoristas. Por ejemplo, la calabaza grande, llamada “zapallo” localmente, es popular para hacer sopa en Bolivia. El zapallo ecol√≥gico no est√° disponible, pero en este cultivo se usan pocos productos qu√≠micos, por lo que Laura lo compra para venderlo a sus clientes. El negocio es tan din√°mico que el hermano y un primo de Laura tambi√©n ayudan en su puesto.

A sus 30 a√Īos, Laura est√° tan contenta con su trabajo que anima a otros j√≥venes a seguir su ejemplo, “porque con la agricultura ecol√≥gica no s√≥lo te cuidas t√ļ. Cuidas la tierra, cuidas el medio ambiente. Y es m√°s, vas a cuidar a las futuras generaciones.‚ÄĚ

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Optando por la agricultura

 

Een jonge advocaat komt thuis om te boeren

Laura Guzm√°n groeide op op een kleine boerderij aan de rand van de stad Cochabamba, ging naar de universiteit, studeerde af met een rechtendiploma en verliet toen haar huis. Ze werkte in La Paz, de onoffici√ęle hoofdstad van Bolivia, en deed het goed. Op een reis vulde ze haar waterfles in een beek, zonder te weten dat die was verontreinigd door een mijn stroomopwaarts. Laura werd erg ziek en haar dokter adviseerde haar dat ze op het punt stond maagkanker te krijgen. Hij raadde haar aan te proberen voedsel te vermijden dat met landbouwchemicali√ęn was geproduceerd, omdat ze voorzichtiger met haar gezondheid moest omgaan.

Tijdens Laura’s occasionele weekendbezoeken aan huis hielp ze haar moeder, die onlangs gecertificeerd was om biologische groenten te telen. Laura begon wat groenten mee te nemen naar haar appartement in La Paz. Ze merkte dat ze veel langer meegingen. Een conventioneel geteelde tomaat van de markt ging misschien vijf dagen mee, terwijl een biologische tomaat van thuis minstens twee weken meeging. Ze zag dit als een teken dat agro-ecologische producten gezonder waren.

Laura verliet uiteindelijk haar baan en keerde terug naar huis. Ze begon zich bezig te houden met het werk op de boerderij en vond het heerlijk, vooral het rustige gevoel dat ze kreeg als ze buiten met de planten werkte. In 2020 volgde ze een opleiding bij Agrecol Andes, een lokale NGO, om zelf een gecertificeerde biologische boerin te worden, en sloot ze zich aan bij de groep agro-ecologische boeren van haar moeder.

Paul en Marcella en ik ontmoetten Laura onlangs bij haar thuis, waar ze de groep, voornamelijk vrouwen, hielp hun producten te verpakken voor een thuisbezorgdienst met de naam BolSaludable: van “bolsa” (zak) en “saludable” (gezond).

Op zondag verkoopt Laura haar producten ook op een openluchtmarkt. Ze wint haar klanten √©√©n voor √©√©n voor zich. Ze vertelt hen dat haar groenten iets duurder zijn, omdat ze vrij zijn van chemicali√ęn. Sommige klanten kan het niet schelen, maar sommige komen de week daarop terug en zeggen dat ze op internet hebben gelezen dat er in Bolivia veel pesticiden worden gebruikt (vooral op tomaten). “We nemen gif mee naar huis!” zei een verontruste klant tegen haar.

Op de zondagsmarkt verkoopt Laura een deel van de producten van haar familie, een deel van de producten van de buren, en een deel gezonde producten die ze bij de groothandel koopt. Zo is de grote pompoen, die in Bolivia “zapallo” wordt genoemd, populair voor het maken van soep. Biologische zapallo is niet verkrijgbaar, maar er worden weinig chemicali√ęn gebruikt bij dit gewas, en dus koopt Laura het om aan haar klanten te verkopen. De zaken gaan zo goed dat Laura’s broer en een neef ook helpen in hun kraam.

Laura, nu 30 jaar oud, is zo blij met haar werk dat ze andere jonge mensen aanmoedigt haar voorbeeld te volgen, “want met ecologische landbouw zorg je niet alleen voor jezelf, maar ook voor de aarde, voor het milieu. En bovendien zorg je voor de toekomstige generaties.”

The struggle to sell healthy food January 22nd, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Consumers are increasingly realizing the need to eat healthy food, produced without agrochemicals, but on our recent trip to Bolivia we were reminded once more that many organic farmers struggle to sell their produce at a fair price.

The last few days Jeff, Marcella and I have been filming with a group of agroecological farmers in Cochabamba, a city with 1.4 million inhabitants at an altitude of about 2,400 meters. Traditionally, local demand for flowers was high, to use as gifts and decorations at the many festivities, weddings, funerals and family celebrations. When we interview do√Īa Nelly in front of the camera, she explains how many of the women of her agroecological group were into the commercial cut flower business until 5 years ago: ‚ÄúThe main reason we abandoned the flower business was that various people in our neighbourhood became seriously sick from the heavy use of pesticides.‚ÄĚ

As the women began to produce vegetables instead of flowers, they also took training on ecological farming. They realized that the only way to remain in good health is to care for the health of their soil and the food they consume. All of them being born farmers, the step to start growing organic food seemed a logical one. With the support of a Agrecol Andes, a local NGO that supports agroecological food systems, a group of 16 women embarked on a new journey, full of new challenges.

‚ÄúOver these past years, we have seen our soil improve again, earthworms and other soil creatures have come back. But I think it will take 10 years before the soil will have fully recovered from the intense misuse of flower growing,‚ÄĚ says Nelly.

On Friday morning, we visit the house of one of the members of the group. Various women arrive, carrying their produce in woven bags on their back. Their fresh produce was harvested the day before, washed, weighed, packed and labelled with their group certificate. Internationally recognized organic certification is costly and most farmers in developing countries cannot afford it. So, they use an alternative, more local certification scheme, called Participatory Guarantee System or PGS, whereby member producers evaluate each other. More recently, the group also gets certification from the national government, SENASAG.

Agrecol staff supports the women as they prepare food baskets for their growing number of customers that want their food delivered either at their home or office. Some customers also come and collect their weekly basket at the Agrecol office. Jeff’s wife, Ana, shows us one evening how every week she receives a list of about 4 pages with all produce available that week, and the prices. Until Wednesday noon, the 150 clients are free to select if and what they want to buy. The demand is processed, farmers harvest on Thursday and the fresh food is delivered on Friday morning: a really short food chain with food that has only been harvested the day before it was delivered.

Organizing personalised food baskets weekly is time-consuming. Most farmers also need institutional support as they lack a social network of potential clients in urban centres. Agrecol has invested a lot in sensitising consumers about the need to consume healthy food, using leaflets, social media, fairs and farm visits for consumers. Without support from Agrecol or someone who takes it up as a full-time business, it is difficult for farmers to sell their high-quality produce.

In her interview, Nelly explains that the home delivery was a recent innovation they introduced when the Covid crisis hit, as local markets had closed down, yet people still needed food. Now that public markets re-opened, demand strongly fluctuates from one week to the next, and with the tight profit margins, it might be a challenge to turn it into profitable business. NGOs like Agrecol play a crucial role in helping farmers produce healthy food, and raising the awareness of consumers, who learn to appreciate organic produce.

As Cochabamba is a large city, Agrecol has over the years helped agroecological farmer groups to negotiate with the local authorities to ensure they have a dedicated space on the weekly markets in various parts of the city.

Local authorities have a crucial role to play in supporting ecological and organic farmers that goes way beyond providing training and inspecting fields. Farmers need a fair price and a steady market to sell their produce. Being given a space at conventional, urban markets and dedicated agroecological markets is helping, but in low-income countries very few consumers are willing to pay a little extra for food that is produced free of chemicals. Public procurements by local authorities to provide schools with healthy food may provide a more stable source of revenue. It is no surprise that global movements such as the Global Alliance of Organic Districts (GAOD) have put this as a central theme.

Agroecological farmers who go the extra mile to nurture the health of our planet and the people who live on it, deserve a stable, fair income and peace of mind.

As Nelly concluded in her interview: “It is a struggle, but we have to fight it for the good of our children and those who come after them.”

Related blogs

Better food for better farming

Marketing as a performance

Choosing to farm

An exit strategy

Exit strategy 2.0

Look me in the eyes

Related training videos

Creating agroecological markets

Home delivery of organic produce

 

De strijd om gezond voedsel te verkopen

Consumenten worden zich steeds meer bewust van de noodzaak om gezond voedsel te eten, geproduceerd zonder landbouwchemicali√ęn, maar tijdens onze recente reis naar Bolivia werden we er opnieuw aan herinnerd dat veel biologische boeren moeite hebben om hun producten tegen een eerlijke prijs te verkopen.

De afgelopen dagen hebben Jeff, Marcella en ik gefilmd met een groep agro-ecologische boeren in Cochabamba, een stad met 1,4 miljoen inwoners op een hoogte van ongeveer 2.400 meter. Traditioneel was de lokale vraag naar bloemen groot, om te gebruiken als geschenk en decoratie bij de vele festiviteiten, bruiloften, begrafenissen en familiefeesten. Als we do√Īa Nelly voor de camera interviewen, legt ze uit hoe veel van de vrouwen van haar agro-ecologische groep tot 5 jaar geleden in de commerci√ęle snijbloemenhandel zaten: “De belangrijkste reden dat we de bloemenhandel hebben opgegeven was dat verschillende mensen in onze buurt ernstig ziek werden door het zware gebruik van pesticiden.”

Toen de vrouwen groenten begonnen te produceren in plaats van bloemen, volgden ze ook een opleiding ecologisch tuinieren. Ze beseften dat de enige manier om gezond te blijven, is te zorgen voor de gezondheid van hun grond en het voedsel dat ze consumeren. Omdat ze allemaal geboren boeren zijn, leek de stap om biologisch voedsel te gaan verbouwen een logische. Met de steun van Agrecol Andes, een lokale NGO die agro-ecologische voedselsystemen ondersteunt, begon een groep van 16 vrouwen aan een nieuwe reis, vol nieuwe uitdagingen.

“De afgelopen jaren hebben we onze grond weer zien verbeteren, regenwormen en andere bodemorganismen zijn teruggekomen. Maar ik denk dat het 10 jaar zal duren voordat de grond volledig hersteld is van het intensieve misbruik van de bloementeelt,” zegt Nelly.

Op vrijdagochtend bezoeken we het huis van een van de leden van de groep. Verschillende vrouwen arriveren, met hun producten in geweven zakken op hun rug. Hun verse producten zijn de dag ervoor geoogst, gewassen, gewogen, verpakt en voorzien van hun groepscertificaat. Internationaal erkende biologische certificering is duur en de meeste boeren in ontwikkelingslanden kunnen zich dat niet veroorloven. Daarom gebruiken ze een alternatief, meer lokaal certificeringssysteem, het zogenaamde Participatory Guarantee System of PGS, waarbij de aangesloten producenten elkaar controleren. Sinds kort wordt de groep ook gecertificeerd door de nationale overheid, SENASAG.

De medewerkers van Agrecol ondersteunen de vrouwen bij het samenstellen van de voedselpakketten voor hun groeiende aantal klanten die hun voedsel thuis of op kantoor geleverd willen krijgen. Sommige klanten komen ook hun wekelijkse mand ophalen in het kantoor van Agrecol. Jeff’s vrouw, Ana, laat ons op een avond zien hoe zij elke week een lijst van ongeveer 4 pagina’s ontvangt met alle producten die die week beschikbaar zijn, en de prijzen. Tot woensdagmiddag zijn de 150 klanten vrij om te kiezen of en wat ze willen kopen. De vraag wordt verwerkt, de boeren oogsten op donderdag en het verse voedsel wordt op vrijdagochtend geleverd: een echt korte voedselketen met voedsel dat pas de dag voor de levering is geoogst.

Het wekelijks organiseren van gepersonaliseerde voedselmanden is tijdrovend. De meeste boeren hebben ook institutionele steun nodig omdat ze geen sociaal netwerk van potenti√ęle klanten in stedelijke centra hebben. Agrecol heeft veel ge√Įnvesteerd in het sensibiliseren van consumenten over de noodzaak van gezonde voeding, met behulp van folders, sociale media, beurzen en boerderijbezoeken voor consumenten. Zonder steun van Agrecol of iemand die er fulltime mee bezig is, is het voor boeren moeilijk om hun kwaliteitsproducten te verkopen.

In haar interview legt Nelly uit dat de thuisbezorging een recente innovatie was die ze introduceerde toen de Covid-crisis toesloeg, omdat de lokale markten gesloten waren, maar de mensen toch voedsel nodig hadden. Nu de openbare markten weer geopend zijn, schommelt de vraag sterk van week tot week, en met de krappe winstmarges kan het een uitdaging zijn om er een winstgevend bedrijf van te maken. NGO’s als Agrecol spelen een cruciale rol door de boeren te helpen gezond voedsel te produceren, en door de consumenten bewuster te maken van biologische producten.

Omdat Cochabamba een grote stad is, heeft Agrecol in de loop der jaren groepen agro-ecologische boeren geholpen bij de onderhandelingen met de lokale autoriteiten om ervoor te zorgen dat zij een speciale plaats krijgen op de wekelijkse markten in verschillende delen van de stad.

Lokale autoriteiten spelen een cruciale rol bij de ondersteuning van ecologische en biologische boeren, die veel verder gaat dan het geven van trainingen en het inspecteren van velden. Boeren hebben een eerlijke prijs en een vaste markt nodig om hun producten te verkopen. Een plaats krijgen op conventionele, stedelijke markten en speciale agro-ecologische markten helpt, maar in lage-inkomenslanden zijn maar weinig consumenten bereid een beetje extra te betalen voor voedsel dat zonder chemicali√ęn is geproduceerd. Openbare aanbestedingen door lokale overheden om scholen te voorzien van gezond voedsel kunnen een stabielere bron van inkomsten opleveren. Het is geen verrassing dat wereldwijde bewegingen zoals de Global Alliance for Organic Districts (GAOD) dit als een centraal thema stellen.

Agro-ecologische boeren die een stapje extra zetten om de gezondheid van onze planeet en de mensen die erop leven te voeden, verdienen een stabiel, eerlijk inkomen en gemoedsrust.

Zoals Nelly zei in haar interview: “het is een strijd, maar we moeten deze voeren voor het welzijn van onze kinderen en zij die na hen komen.”

A climate film November 13th, 2022 by

A movie about rural people, filmed with them, in their communities, is rare, even more so when it touches on important topics like climate change.

In the Bolivian film Utama, directed by Santiaga Loayza, the main characters, Virgilio and Sisa are an elderly couple living on the Bolivian Altiplano, in a two-room adobe house. They still love each other, after many years together. Virgilio has never forgiven his son, for moving to the city, years ago. When the couple¬īs grandson, Cl√©ver, comes to visit, the old man is angry. He feels that Cl√©ver‚Äôs father has sent him to take Virgilio and Sisa to the city.

The stunning photography shows the stark beauty of the hills and mountains rising from the high plains. The characters are believable and authentic. The title, Utama, means ‚Äúour home‚ÄĚ in the Aymara language.

The story takes place near the end of a long drought, exacerbated by climate change. Virgilio, Cléver and some of the neighbors hike to a mountain top to perform a ritual to bring the rain, which never comes. Some families leave for the city. Virgilio develops an agonizing cough, refuses to let Cléver take him to the hospital, and dies at home.

The elderly couple is played by José Calcina and Luisa Quispe, who are married in real life, and are from the community where the movie was filmed, Santiago de Chuvica, in Potosí, Bolivia. They were cast because of their obvious affection for each other. This realism is accentuated when the couple speak to each other in Quechua, a native language of Bolivia.

Loayza had previously visited Santiago de Chuvica while making a documentary film. In reality, the village is an outpost for travelers visiting the famous Salar de Uyuni, a giant salt flat, an ancient lake bed surrounded by sparse vegetation.

This is one of the most remote parts of Bolivia, and one of the most marginal environments for agriculture in the world. Quinoa is the only crop that will grow here. Until the mid-twentieth century, local farmers made their living by packing out quinoa on the backs of llamas, to trade for food in other parts of Bolivia. It was an ingenious, and unusual cropping system, based on one crop and one animal.

But as the world gets hotter and dryer, places like Chuvica will only become more stressed.

Although not shown in the movie, some parts of Bolivia are far more favorable to farming, with spring-like weather much of the year, where many crops will grow. People are also leaving these areas for the city. Whole communities are emptying out. In the provincial valleys of Cochabamba it is common to see few homes except for ruined, empty farm houses. The grandparents who lived there may have died, but their heirs are still tilling the fields, commuting from town. Farming is often the most resilient part of rural life, and the last to be abandoned.

Climate change is a real problem, and will turn some people into environmental refugees. But villagers are also leaving more favorable farm country, pulled by the opportunities for jobs, education, health care and commerce in the cities. If rural-to-urban migration is seen as a problem, then country life needs to be made more comfortable, with roads, electricity, potable water, schools and clinics.

At the 2022 Sundance Film Festival Utama won the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic Competition.  Hopefully other filmmakers will make more movies on climate change, and on rural life. There are lots more stories to tell.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

High Andean climate change

Recovering from the quinoa boom

Videos on climate

Recording the weather, also available in Spanish, Quechua and Aymara

Forecasting the weather with an app, also available in Spanish, Quechua and Aymara

Additional reading

Sag√°rnaga, Rafael 2022 Alejandro Loayza: Hay que hacer que el mundo escuche tus historias. Los Tiempos 13 Feb pp. 2-3.

El Pa√≠s 2022 ‚ÄėUtama‚Äô, la historia de amor frente al olvido en el Altiplano que sorprendi√≥ en Sundance

Design by Olean webdesign