WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Capturing carbon in our soils December 12th, 2021 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Participants at the recent climate summit in Glasgow (COP26) spent considerable energy discussing about ways to further reduce carbon emissions and improve regulation of carbon markets. For the first time in history, fossil fuels have been officially recognised as the main cause of heating our planet. While investments in renewable energy have been long overdue, agriculture continues to be a net polluter and contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Yet, with some relatively modest investment agriculture could even become a net absorber of GHGs.

Few people realise that more carbon can be captured by soils than what is stored in the wood of trees. So, paying attention to what we do with our soils is as important as protecting our forests.

A high level of organic matter is the main indicator of soil health, determining the level of resilience of farms to cope with the effects of disruption in the climate. Carbon-rich soils are essential to secure future food production, because carbon feeds soil microorganisms and helps soils to retain water and nutrients, which are all essential for growing plants.

Adding compost to soils is one common way of enriching the soil with carbon. When plants die and decompose, the living organisms of the soil, such as bacteria, fungi or earthworms, transform the plants into forms of organic matter that the earth can absorb. But also living plants transfer lots of carbon from the air to the soil in a remarkable way. In the daytime, plants absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air through the pores of their leaves. During photosynthesis, plants use water and sunlight to turn the carbon into leaves, stems, seeds and roots. However, as one third of the CO2 captured is released as sugars by plant roots to the soil, one may wonder why the plants are “leaking”.

Plants, like all living creatures, cannot live in isolation; they need others to survive. The liquid sugars released by plant roots are part of a symbiotic relationship between mycorrhizal fungi and 90% of all plants, an arrangement that has developed over the past 420 million years. In fact, plants cannot survive without these soil fungi and vice versa.

Mycorrhizal fungi cannot live without a host plant and, in exchange for the plant’s sugar, the fungi will absorb and transport nutrients and water back to its host.  For every cubic meter of soil, these fungi will send out as much as 20,000 km of fungal threads, also called hyphae, so that they infiltrate every area of soil.  Fungi can access nutrients and water unavailable to the larger plant roots.

Fungi can also use their acids to release nutrients from soils and even rocks — transforming rock minerals into formats that the plant can use. The complexity of interactions between plants and soil organisms goes even further. Certain nutrients can only be extracted from soils by bacteria and fungi will exchange sugar for the nutrients requested by the plant in a complex symbiotic exchange.

Studies have shown that soils under mature, perennial crops contain more available nutrients than soils treated with agricultural chemicals, which kill soil microbes, resulting in the net loss of soil carbon. Policies that promote agroecology, regenerative farming and organic agriculture are therefore directly contributing to soil carbon sequestration and hence help to fight against climate change. But more can be done.

It has long been thought that most of the soil carbon was contained in the top 30 centimetres of the soil in the form of the organic matter in humus. In 1996, Dr. Sara Wright discovered in the USA that soils contain large amounts of carbon up to more than a meter deep. Carbon is stored in the form of glomalin, a highly persistent protein produced by mycorrhizal fungi. As the mycorrhizal fungi go deeper into the soil to mine nutrients and water for the plant, they deposit more and more carbon in the form of glomalin. The more mature this relationship is between plant and microbe the more volume of soil is accessed on behalf of the plant and the better the crop will produce and be able to cope with harsh weather conditions.

Ploughing destroys soil organic matter by oxidation and releases much of the carbon stored in the top soil as CO2, which finds its way to the atmosphere. Ploughing also depletes the micro-organisms in the soil. Reduced tillage and ensuring more permanent soil coverage by plants is therefore crucial to build up a healthy soil life and keep carbon stored in the soil.

Permanent pasture soils with healthy microbial life have been increasing the amount of carbon that they sequester beneath the grasses each year. Practices such as agroforestry and establishing field hedges are other low-cost strategies that can help turn the tide of our warming planet.

In fact, an annual increase of soil organic carbon by 0.4% would neutralise the human-caused emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. This scientific insight was at the basis of the “4 per 1000” initiative to which many governments, research institutes, civil society and companies already subscribed during the climate summit in Paris in 2015. While the European Green Deal has set a target to be climate-neutral by 2050, the increasing natural calamities we witness year after year shows us that we have no more time to lose.

Illustration credit

Mycorrhiza by Nefronus, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=80931388

Read more

The Liquid Carbon Pathway (LCP): http://www.carbon-drawdown.com/liquid-carbon-pathway.html

The 4 per 1000 Initiative: https://www.4p1000.org/

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Community and microbes

Experiments with trees

From Uniformity to Diversity

Living Soil: A film review

Inspiring knowledge platforms

Access Agriculture: https://www.accessagriculture.org is a specialised video platform with freely downloadable farmer training videos on ecological farming with a focus on the Global South.

EcoAgtube: https://www.ecoagtube.org is the alternative to Youtube where anyone from across the globe can upload their own videos related to ecological farming and circular economy.

 

Koolstof vastleggen in onze bodem

Deelnemers aan de recente klimaattop in Glasgow (COP26) besteedden veel energie aan het bespreken van manieren om de koolstofemissies verder te verminderen en de regulering van koolstofmarkten te verbeteren. Voor het eerst in de geschiedenis zijn fossiele brandstoffen officieel erkend als de belangrijkste oorzaak van de opwarming van onze planeet. Hoewel investeringen in hernieuwbare energie al lang op zich lieten wachten, blijft de landbouw een netto vervuiler en bijdrager aan de uitstoot van broeikasgassen (BKG). Maar met relatief bescheiden investeringen zou de landbouw zelfs een netto absorbeerder van broeikasgassen kunnen worden.

Weinig mensen realiseren zich dat er meer koolstof door de bodem kan worden vastgelegd dan er in het hout van bomen wordt opgeslagen. Aandacht besteden aan wat we met onze bodem doen, is dus net zo belangrijk als het beschermen van onze bossen.

Een hoog gehalte aan organische stof is de belangrijkste indicator voor de gezondheid van de bodem en bepaalt de mate van veerkracht van bedrijven om de effecten van verstoringen in het klimaat het hoofd te bieden. Koolstofrijke bodems zijn essentieel om de toekomstige voedselproductie veilig te stellen, omdat koolstof de bodemmicro-organismen voedt en de bodem helpt om water en voedingsstoffen vast te houden, die allemaal essentieel zijn voor het kweken van planten.

Het toevoegen van compost aan de bodem is een veelgebruikte manier om de bodem met koolstof te verrijken. Wanneer planten afsterven en uiteenvallen, transformeren de levende organismen van de bodem, zoals bacteriën, schimmels en regenwormen, ze in vormen van organisch materiaal dat de aarde kan opnemen. Maar ook levende planten brengen op opmerkelijke wijze veel koolstof uit de lucht naar de bodem. Overdag nemen planten koolstofdioxide (CO2) op uit de lucht via de poriën van hun bladeren. Tijdens de fotosynthese gebruiken planten water en zonlicht om de koolstof om te zetten in bladeren, stengels en wortels. Echter, aangezien een derde van de opgevangen CO2 als suikers door plantenwortels aan de bodem wordt afgegeven, kan men zich afvragen waarom de planten “lekken”.

Planten, zoals alle levende wezens, kunnen niet geïsoleerd leven; ze hebben anderen nodig om te overleven. De vloeibare suikers die door plantenwortels vrijkomen, maken deel uit van een symbiotische relatie tussen mycorrhiza-schimmels en 90% van alle planten, een arrangement dat zich in de afgelopen 420 miljoen jaar heeft ontwikkeld. Sterker nog, planten kunnen niet zonder deze bodemschimmels en vice versa.

Mycorrhiza-schimmels kunnen niet leven zonder een waardplant en in ruil voor de suiker van de plant zullen de schimmels voedingsstoffen en water opnemen en terugvoeren naar de gastheer. Voor elke kubieke meter grond sturen deze schimmels maar liefst 20.000 km schimmeldraden, ook wel hyfen genoemd, uit, zodat ze in elk gebied van de bodem infiltreren. Schimmels hebben toegang tot voedingsstoffen en water die niet beschikbaar zijn voor de grotere plantenwortels.

Schimmels kunnen hun zuren ook gebruiken om voedingsstoffen uit de bodem en zelfs uit rotsen vrij te maken, waardoor gesteentemineralen worden omgezet in nutrienten die de plant kan gebruiken. De complexiteit van interacties tussen planten en bodemorganismen gaat nog verder. Bepaalde voedingsstoffen kunnen alleen door bacteriën uit de bodem worden gehaald en schimmels wisselen suiker uit voor de voedingsstoffen die de plant nodig heeft in een complexe symbiotische uitwisseling.

Studies hebben aangetoond dat bodems onder volgroeide, meerjarige gewassen meer beschikbare voedingsstoffen bevatten dan bodems die zijn behandeld met landbouwchemicaliën, die bodemmicroben doden, wat resulteert in het netto verlies van bodemkoolstof. Beleid dat agro-ecologie, regeneratieve landbouw en biologische landbouw bevordert, draagt ​​daarom rechtstreeks bij aan de vastlegging van koolstof in de bodem en helpt zo de klimaatverandering tegen te gaan. Maar er kan meer gedaan worden.

Lange tijd werd gedacht dat de meeste bodemkoolstof zich in de bovenste 30 centimeter van de bodem bevond in de vorm van de organische stof in humus. In 1996 ontdekte Dr. Sara Wright in de VS dat bodems grote hoeveelheden koolstof bevatten tot meer dan een meter diep. Koolstof wordt opgeslagen in de vorm van glomaline, een zeer persistent eiwit dat wordt geproduceerd door mycorrhiza-schimmels. Naarmate de mycorrhiza-schimmels dieper de grond in gaan om voedingsstoffen en water voor de plant te ontginnen, zetten ze steeds meer koolstof af in de vorm van glomaline. Hoe volwassener deze relatie tussen plant en microbe is, hoe meer grond er voor de plant wordt aangesproken en hoe beter het gewas zal produceren en bestand is tegen barre weersomstandigheden.

Ploegen vernietigt organisch bodemmateriaal door oxidatie en geeft veel van de koolstof die in de bovenste bodem is opgeslagen vrij als CO2, dat zijn weg naar de atmosfeer vindt. Ploegen put ook de micro-organismen in de bodem uit. Minder grondbewerking en zorgen voor een meer permanente bodembedekking door planten is daarom cruciaal om een ​​gezond bodemleven op te bouwen en koolstof in de bodem vast te houden.

Bodems van blijvend grasland met gezond microbieel leven verhogen de hoeveelheid koolstof die ze elk jaar onder de grassen vastleggen. Praktijken zoals agroforestry en het aanleggen van heggen en houtkanten zijn andere goedkope strategieën die kunnen helpen het tij van onze opwarmende planeet te keren.

In feite zou een jaarlijkse toename van de organische koolstof in de bodem met 0,4% de door de mens veroorzaakte uitstoot van CO2 in de atmosfeer kunnen neutraliseren. Dit wetenschappelijke inzicht lag aan de basis van het “4 per 1000”-initiatief waar veel overheden, onderzoeksinstituten, het maatschappelijk middenveld en bedrijven al op intekenden tijdens de klimaattop in Parijs in 2015. Terwijl de Europese Green Deal een doelstelling heeft klimaat-neutraal te zijn tegen 2050, laten de toenemende natuurrampen waar we jaar na jaar getuige van zijn, ons zien dat we geen tijd meer te verliezen hebben.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Design by Olean webdesign