WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

A positive validation December 19th, 2021 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

To ‚Äúvalidate‚ÄĚ extension material means to show an advanced draft of one‚Äôs work to people from one‚Äôs target audience, to gauge their reaction. The validations work like magic to fine-tune vocabulary and often to improve the content of the message.

In our script-writers’ workshop at Agro-Insight, we validate our fact sheets, taking them to the field and asking farmers to read them. It is a great way to learn to write for our audience. But on 23 November, in Pujilí, in the Ecuadorian Andes, we saw that validation can also highlight the value of a whole topic.

My colleagues Diego Mina and Mayra Coro work in the mountains above the small city of Pujilí. So they kindly took eight of us from the course to a community where they work. Fact sheets in hand, we all spread out, ready to get constructive criticism from farmers.

One of the fact sheets explained that wasps, many flies and other insects need flowering plants to survive. Crops and even weeds that blossom with flowers can attract the right insects to kill pests. I loved the topic at first sight and I encouraged Diego and Mayra to write a fact sheet about it.

So with great optimism we approached a young couple working on a stalled motorcycle. The couple took the fact sheet and read it. Then we asked them to comment.

“It‚Äôs fine. It would be good to have a project here on medicinal plants,” the young man said.

That was off topic. The fact sheet wasn’t about a medicinal plant project, so Mayra gently asked them to say more. The young man grew quiet and the young woman wouldn’t say a word. Then they got on their motorcycle and rode off.

Diego thought we might get a more considered response from someone he knew, so he took us to meet one of his collaborating farmers, do√Īa Alicia.

We found do√Īa Alicia hanging up the wet laundry at home. She was reluctant to even hold the fact sheet. “My husband knows about these things”, she said. “Not me”. It was sad to hear her say that, before she even knew what the topic was.

Do√Īa Alicia added that she did not know how to read, so Mayra read her the fact sheet. But when she finished, do√Īa Alicia didn‚Äôt have much to say.

Fortunately, some of our other colleagues were writing a fact sheet on helping women to assume leadership roles in local organizations. ¬†Diego Mina said “I think that do√Īa Alicia would be interested in that fact sheet.”

As if on cue, our colleagues Diego Montalvo and Guadalupe Padilla walked around the bend in the road, with their fact sheet on women leaders. Diego Mina introduced them to do√Īa Alicia.

I wasn‚Äôt sure that do√Īa Alicia would be any more interested in women and organizations than she was in insects and flowers. But within minutes she was having an animated conversation with Diego and Guadalupe. Do√Īa Alicia even shared a personal experience: the men tend to assume the community‚Äôs formal leadership positions, but once, when most of the men were working away from home, they asked do√Īa Alicia and some of the other village women to take leading roles in some local organizations. When the men came back, they started to make all the decisions, and the women became leaders in name only.

In this community, the women had received no training in leadership. There were no women’s groups, which may have contributed to their shyness. As we will see in next week’s blog, organized women may have more self-confidence.

Diego and Guadalupe told me that on that day they got good, relevant comments from five different women, on their fact sheet about female leaders.

I have written before that some topics, like insect ecology, are difficult for local people to observe. Folks may not realize that many insects are beneficial. It may take a lot of work to spark people’s interest in topics like insect ecology. But the effort is worthwhile, because people who do not know about good insects are often too eager to buy insecticides.

Further reading

Bentley, Jeffery W. & Gonzalo Rodr√≠guez 2001 ‚ÄúHonduran Folk Entomology.‚ÄĚ Current Anthropology 42(2):285-301.

Related Agro-Insight blog stories

A hard write

A spoonful of molasses

Guardians of the mango

Learning from students

Nourishing a fertile imagination

On the road to yoghurt

Spontaneous generation

The curse of knowledge

The rules and the players

The vanishing factsheet

Turtles vs snails

Related videos

The wasp that protects our crops

Women in extension

Acknowledgements

Mayra Coro and Diego Mina work for the Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD). Guadalupe Padilla and Diego Montalvo work for EkoRural. Thanks to all, and to Paul Van Mele, for reading and commenting on a previous draft of this story. Our work was supported by the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation.

Photo credits

First photo by Jeff Bentley. Second photo by Diego Mina

UNA VALIDACI√ďN POSITIVA

Por Jeff Bentley,

‚ÄúValidar” el material de extensi√≥n significa mostrar un borrador avanzado del trabajo a personas del p√ļblico meta, para ver su reacci√≥n. Las validaciones son la clave para afinar el vocabulario y, a menudo, para mejorar el contenido del mensaje.

En nuestro taller de guionistas de Agro-Insight, validamos nuestras hojas volantes, llev√°ndolas al campo y pidiendo a los agricultores que las lean. Es una buena manera de aprender a escribir para nuestro p√ļblico. Pero el 23 de noviembre, en Pujil√≠, en los Andes ecuatorianos, vimos que la validaci√≥n tambi√©n puede resaltar el valor de todo un tema.

Mis colegas Diego Mina y Mayra Coro trabajan en la sierra arriba de la peque√Īa ciudad de Pujil√≠. As√≠ que gentilmente nos llevaron a ocho personas del taller a una comunidad donde trabajan. Hojas volantes en mano, nos separamos en grupitos para recibir cr√≠ticas constructivas de los agricultores.

Una de las hojas volantes explicaba que las avispas, muchas moscas y otros insectos necesitan de las plantas en flor para sobrevivir. Los cultivos e incluso las malezas que florecen pueden atraer a los insectos que matan a las plagas. El tema me encantó a primera vista y animé a Diego y a Mayra a que escribieran una hoja volante sobre el tema.

Así que, con gran optimismo, nos acercamos a una joven pareja que arreglaba su moto en el camino. Tomaron la hoja volante y la leyeron. Luego les pedimos que comentaran.

“Est√° bien. Ser√≠a bueno tener un proyecto aqu√≠ sobre las plantas medicinales”, dijo el joven.

Eso estaba fuera de tema. La hoja volante no trataba sobre un proyecto de plantas medicinales, así que Mayra les pidió amablemente que dijeran algo más. El joven se quedó callado y la joven no quiso decir nada. Luego se subieron a la moto y se fueron.

Diego pens√≥ que podr√≠amos obtener una respuesta m√°s considerada de alguien que conoc√≠a, as√≠ que nos present√≥ a una de sus agricultoras colaboradoras, do√Īa Alicia, que viv√≠a cerca.

Encontramos a do√Īa Alicia tendiendo la ropa mojada en su casa. Era reacia incluso a agarrar la hoja volante. “Mi marido sabe de estas cosas”, dijo. “Yo no”. Fue triste o√≠rla decir eso, antes incluso de saber qu√© era el tema.

Do√Īa Alicia a√Īadi√≥ que no sab√≠a leer, entonces Mayra le ley√≥ la hoja volante. Pero cuando termin√≥, do√Īa Alicia no ten√≠a mucho que decir.

Afortunadamente, algunos de nuestros otros colegas estaban escribiendo una hoja volante sobre c√≥mo ayudar a las mujeres a asumir funciones de liderazgo en las organizaciones locales. ¬†Diego Mina dijo: “Creo que a do√Īa Alicia le interesar√≠a esa hoja volante”.

Como si fuera una se√Īal, nuestros colegas Diego Montalvo y Guadalupe Padilla aparecieron en la curva del camino con su hoja volante sobre lideresas. Diego Mina les present√≥ a do√Īa Alicia.

Yo dudaba de que do√Īa Alicia estuviera m√°s interesada en las lideresas y las organizaciones que en los insectos y las flores. Pero en pocos minutos estaba metida en una animada conversaci√≥n con Diego y Guadalupe. Do√Īa Alicia incluso comparti√≥ una experiencia personal: los hombres tienden a asumir los puestos de liderazgo formal de la comunidad, pero una vez, cuando la mayor√≠a de los hombres estaban trabajando fuera de casa, pidieron a do√Īa Alicia y a algunas de las otras mujeres de la comunidad que asumieran papeles de liderazgo en algunas organizaciones locales. Cuando los hombres volvieron, empezaron a tomar todas las decisiones, y las mujeres se convirtieron en l√≠deres s√≥lo de nombre.

En esta comunidad, las mujeres no habían recibido ninguna formación sobre el liderazgo. No había grupos de mujeres, lo que puede haber contribuido a su timidez. Como veremos en el blog de la próxima semana, las mujeres organizadas pueden tener más confianza en sí mismas.

Diego y Guadalupe me contaron que ese día obtuvieron buenos y relevantes comentarios de cinco mujeres diferentes, sobre su hoja informativa acerca de las mujeres líderes.

Ya he escrito antes que algunos temas, como la ecología de los insectos, son difíciles de observar para los campesinos. La gente raras veces se da cuenta de que muchos insectos son buenos. Puede costar mucho trabajo despertar el interés de la gente por temas como la ecología de los insectos. Pero el esfuerzo merece la pena, porque la gente que no conoce los insectos buenos suele estar demasiado dispuesta a comprar insecticidas.

Lectura adicional

Bentley, Jeffery W. & Gonzalo Rodr√≠guez 2001 ‚ÄúHonduran Folk Entomology.‚ÄĚ Current Anthropology 42(2):285-301.

Bentley, Jeffery W. & Peter Baker 2006 ‚ÄúComprendiendo y Obteniendo lo M√°ximo del Conocimiento Local de los Agricultores,‚ÄĚ pp. 67-75. In Julian Gonsalves, Thomas Becker, Ann Braun, Dindo Campilan, Hidelisa de Chavez, Elizabth Fajber, Monica Kapiriri, Joy Rivaca-Caminade & Ronnie Vernooy (eds.) Investigaci√≥n y Desarrollo Participativo para la Agricultura y el Manejo Sostenible de Recursos Naturales: Libro de Consulta. Tomo 1. Comprendiendo Investigaci√≥n y Desarrollo Participativo. Manila: CIP-Upward/IDRC.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Aprender de los estudiantes

La Hoja Volante Desaparecida

A hard write

A spoonful of molasses

Guardians of the mango

Nourishing a fertile imagination

On the road to yoghurt

Spontaneous generation

The curse of knowledge

The rules and the players

Turtles vs snails

Videos de interés

La avispa que protege nuestros cultivos

Las mujeres en la extensión

Agradecimientos

Mayra Coro y Diego Mina trabajan para el Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD). Guadalupe Padilla y Diego Montalvo trabajan para EkoRural. Gracias a ellos y a Paul Van Mele por leer y hacer comentarios sobre una versión previa de este relato. Nuestro trabajo ha sido auspiciado por el Programa Colaborativo de Investigación sobre Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight.

Créditos de las fotos

Primera foto por Jeff Bentley. Segunda foto por Diego Mina

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Design by Olean webdesign