WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Proinpa: Agricultural research worth waiting for May 21st, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Agricultural research is notoriously slow. It takes years to bear fruit, and donor-funded agencies don’t always last very long. But Bolivia got lucky with one organization that survived.

It started in 1989, when the Swiss funded a project to do potato research, the Potato Research Program (Proinpa), working closely with a core staff of four scientists from the International Potato Center (CIP). Most of the other staff were young Bolivians, including many thesis students.

Ten years later, in 1998, it was time to fold up the project, but some visionary people from Proinpa, with enthusiastic support of Swiss and CIP colleagues, decided to give Proinpa a new life as a permanent agency or foundation.

By then ‚ÄúProinpa‚ÄĚ had some name-brand recognition, so they wisely kept the acronym, but changed the full name to ‚ÄúPromotion and Research of Andean Products.‚ÄĚ Proinpa‚Äôs leaders were not going to limit themselves to potatoes any more. The Swiss provided an endowment to pay for core costs, but it was not enough to run the whole organization.

Proinpa went through some rough times. When they stopped being a project, they had to give up their spacious offices in the city of Cochabamba. For a while they rented an aging building far from the city that had been used as a government rabies control center. Later, they could only afford one floor of that building. I remember being there on moving day, years ago, when they were all cramming into the smaller space, happily carrying boxes of files to squeeze together into shared offices. They were surviving.

Survival was important. Public-sector agricultural research in Bolivia was going through some rough times. The Bolivian Institute of Agricultural and Livestock Research (IBTA) closed in 1997 and its replacement died a few years later. Government agricultural research only started again In 2008, when the National Institute of Agricultural and Livestock and Forestry Innovation (INIAF) was created. During those years, Proinpa was an outstanding center for agricultural research in Bolivia, and curated priceless collections of potatoes and quinoas.

That potato seedbank was kept at Toralapa, in the countryside some 70 km from the city of Cochabamba. Over the years, Proinpa had expanded the collection from 1000 accessions to 4000. This biodiversity is the source of genetic material that plant breeders need to create new varieties. In 2010, the government, which owned the station at Toralapa, turned it over to INIAF. Proinpa worked with INIAF for a year, to ensure a stable transition, and the government of Bolivia still maintains that collection of potatoes and other Andean crops.

Proinpa recently asked me to join them for their 25th anniversary event, held at their small campus, built after 2005. The celebration started with tours of stands, where Proinpa highlighted their most important research.

Dr. Ximena Cadima, member of the Bolivian Academy of Science, explained how Proinpa has used its knowledge of local crops to breed 69 officially released new varieties, of the potato, quinoa and seven other crops. They also encouraging farmers to grow native potatoes on their farms, which is also crucial for keeping these unique crops alive.

Luis Crespo, entomologist, and Giovanna Plata, plant pathologist, explained their research to develop ecological alternatives to pest control. Luis talked about his work with insect sex pheromones. One of the many things he does is to dissect female moths and remove their scent glands, which he sends to a company in the Netherlands that isolates the sex pheromone from the glands. The company synthesizes the pheromone, makes more of it, and Proinpa uses it to bait traps. Male moths smell the pheromone, think it is a receptive female and fly to it. The frustrated males die in the trap. The females can’t lay eggs without mating, eliminating the next generation of pests before they are born.

Giovana showed us how they study the microbes that kill pathogens. She places different fungi and bacteria in petri dishes to see which microorganisms can physically displace the germs that cause crop diseases. She also isolates plant growth hormones, produced by the good microbes.

This background work on the ecology of microbes has informed Proinpa’s efforts to create a new industry of benign pest control. Jimmy Ciancas, an engineer, led us around Proinpa’s new plant, where they produce tons of beneficial bacteria and fungi to replace the chemicals that farmers use to control pests and diseases.

Proinpa also shows off the research by Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio and colleagues who are developing windbreaks of native plants and sowing wild lupines as a cover crop. This research aims to save the high Andes from the devastating erosion unleashed when the Quinoa Boom of 2010-2014 stripped away native vegetation. The soil simply blew away.

Later, we moved to Proinpa’s comfortable lunch room, which is shaded, but open to the air on three sides, perfect for Cochabamba’s climate. The place had been set up as a formal auditorium, where, for over an hour, Proinpa gave plaques to honor some of the many organizations that had helped them over the years: universities, INIAF, small-town mayors in the municipalities where Proinpa does field work. Many organizations reciprocated, giving Proinpa an award right back. Proinpa has survived because of good leadership, and because of its many friends.

In between the speeches, I got a chance to meet the man sitting next to me, Lionel Ichazo, who supervises three large, commercial farms for a food processing company in the lowlands of Eastern Bolivia. They grow soya in the summer and wheat and sorghum in the winter. Lionel confirmed what Proinpa says, that the use of natural pesticides is exploding on the low plains. Lionel uses Proinpa’s natural pesticides as a seed dressing to control disease. Lionel, who is also an agronomist and a graduate of El Zamorano, one of Latin America’s top agricultural universities (in Honduras), said that he noticed how the soil has been improving over the four years that he has used the microbes. The microorganisms were break down the crop stubble into carbon that the plants can use. Lionel added that most of the large-scale farmers are still treating their seeds with agrochemicals. But they are starting to see that the biological products work, at affordable prices, and are often even cheaper than the chemicals. Of course, the biologicals are safer to handle, and environmentally friendly. And that is key to their success. Demand is skyrocketing.

It has taken many years of research to produce environmentally-sound, biological pesticides that can convince large-scale commercial farmers to start to transition away from agrochemicals. I thought back to a time about 15 years earlier, when I saw Proinpa doing trials with farmers near Cochabamba. That was an early stage of these scientifically-sound natural products. Agricultural research is slow by nature, but like a fruit tree that takes years to mature, the wait is worth the while.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Don’t eat the peels

Commercializing organic inputs

The best knowledge is local and scientific

Recovering from the quinoa boom

Related videos

Making enriched biofertilizer

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

The wasp that protects our crops

Managing the potato tuber moth

Acknowledgements

Paul Van Mele, Graham Thiele, Rolando Oros, Jorge Blajos and Lionel Ichazo read and commented on an earlier version of this blog.

PROINPA: INVESTIGACI√ďN AGR√ćCOLA QUE VALE LA PENA ESPERAR

Jeff Bentley, 21 de mayo del 2023

La investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola es notoriamente lenta. Tarda a√Īos en dar frutos, y los programas financiados por donantes suelen durar poco tiempo. Pero Bolivia tuvo suerte con una organizaci√≥n que sobrevivi√≥.

Empezó en 1989, cuando los suizos financiaron un proyecto nuevo, el Proyecto de Investigación de la Papa (Proinpa), en colaboración con cuatro científicos del Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). Casi todo el resto del personal eran jóvenes bolivianos, entre ellos muchos tesistas.

Diez a√Īos despu√©s, en 1998, lleg√≥ el momento de cerrar el proyecto, pero algunas personas visionarias de Proinpa, con el apoyo entusiasta de colegas suizos y del CIP, decidieron dar a Proinpa una nueva vida como agencia o fundaci√≥n permanente.

Para entonces “Proinpa” ya ten√≠a cierto reconocimiento como marca, as√≠ que sabiamente mantuvieron el acr√≥nimo, pero cambiaron el nombre completo a “Promoci√≥n e Investigaci√≥n de Productos Andinos”. Los dirigentes de Proinpa ya no iban a limitarse a las papas. Los suizos aportaron una dotaci√≥n para cubrir los gastos b√°sicos, pero no era suficiente para hacer funcionar toda la organizaci√≥n.

Proinpa pas√≥ por momentos dif√≠ciles. Cuando dejaron de ser un proyecto, tuvieron que abandonar sus amplias oficinas de la ciudad de Cochabamba. Durante un tiempo alquilaron un viejo edificio alejado de la ciudad que hab√≠a sido un centro gubernamental de control de la rabia. M√°s tarde, s√≥lo pudieron pagar una planta de ese edificio. Recuerdo estar all√≠ el d√≠a de la mudanza, hace a√Īos, cuando todos se dieron modos para entrar en el espacio m√°s peque√Īo, cargando alegremente cajas de archivos para apretarse en oficinas compartidas. Estaban sobreviviendo.

Sobrevivir era importante. La investigaci√≥n agraria p√ļblica en Bolivia atravesaba tiempos dif√≠ciles. El Instituto Boliviano de Investigaci√≥n Agropecuaria (IBTA) cerr√≥ en 1997 y su sustituto muri√≥ pocos a√Īos despu√©s. La investigaci√≥n agropecuaria estatal no se reanud√≥ hasta 2008, cuando se cre√≥ el Instituto Nacional de Innovaci√≥n Agropecuaria y Forestal (INIAF). Durante esos a√Īos, Proinpa fue un destacado centro de investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola en Bolivia, y conserv√≥ invaluables colecciones de papa y quinua.

Ese banco de semillas de papa se manten√≠a en Toralapa, en el campo, a unos 70 km de la ciudad de Cochabamba. Con los a√Īos, Proinpa hab√≠a ampliado la colecci√≥n de 1000 accesiones a 4000. Esta biodiversidad es la fuente de material gen√©tico que necesitan los fitomejoradores para crear nuevas variedades. En 2010, el Gobierno, que era propietario de la estaci√≥n de Toralapa, la cedi√≥ al INIAF. Proinpa trabaj√≥ con el INIAF durante un a√Īo para garantizar una transici√≥n estable, y el Gobierno de Bolivia sigue manteniendo esa colecci√≥n de papas y otros cultivos andinos.

Hace poco, Proinpa me pidi√≥ que me uniera a ellos en el acto de su 25 aniversario, celebrado en su peque√Īo campus, construido despu√©s de 2005. La celebraci√≥n comenz√≥ con visitas a los stands, donde Proinpa destac√≥ sus investigaciones m√°s importantes.

La Dra. Ximena Cadima, miembro de la Academia Boliviana de Ciencias, explic√≥ c√≥mo Proinpa ha usado su conocimiento de los cultivos locales para obtener 69 nuevas variedades oficialmente liberadas de papa, quinua y siete cultivos m√°s. Tambi√©n animan a los agricultores a cultivar papas nativas en sus chacras, lo que tambi√©n es crucial para mantener vivos estos cultivos √ļnicos.

Luis Crespo, entomólogo, y Giovanna Plata, fitopatóloga, explicaron sus investigaciones para desarrollar alternativas ecológicas al control de plagas. Luis habló de su trabajo con las feromonas sexuales de los insectos. Una de las muchas cosas que hace es disecar polillas hembras y extraerles las glándulas de olor, que envía a una empresa en Holanda que aísla la feromona sexual de las glándulas. La empresa sintetiza la feromona, fabrica más y Proinpa la usa para cebo de trampas. Las polillas machos huelen la feromona, piensan que se trata de una hembra receptiva y vuelan hacia ella. Los machos frustrados mueren en la trampa. Las hembras no pueden poner huevos sin aparearse, lo que elimina la siguiente generación de plagas antes de que nazcan.

Giovana nos mostró cómo estudian los microbios que matan a los patógenos. Coloca diferentes hongos y bacterias en placas Petri para ver qué microorganismos pueden desplazar físicamente a los gérmenes que causan enfermedades en los cultivos. También aísla hormonas de crecimiento de plantas, producidas por los microbios buenos.

Este trabajo sobre la ecología de los microbios ha permitido a Proinpa crear una nueva industria de control natural de plagas. Jimmy Ciancas, ingeniero, nos guio por la nueva planta de Proinpa, donde producen toneladas de bacterias y hongos benéficos para sustituir a los químicos que los agricultores fumigan para controlar plagas y enfermedades.

Proinpa también nos mostró las investigaciones del Dr. Alejandro Bonifacio y sus colegas, que están desarrollando rompevientos con plantas nativas y sembrando tarwi silvestre como cultivo de cobertura. Esta investigación tiene como objetivo salvar a los altos Andes de la devastadora erosión desatada cuando el boom de la quinua de (2010-2014) arrasó con la vegetación nativa. El suelo simplemente se voló.

M√°s tarde, nos trasladamos al confortable comedor de Proinpa, sombreado pero abierto al aire por tres lados, perfecto para el clima de Cochabamba. El lugar hab√≠a sido acondicionado como un auditorio formal, donde, durante m√°s de una hora, Proinpa entreg√≥ placas en honor a algunas de las muchas organizaciones que les hab√≠an ayudado a lo largo de los a√Īos: universidades, INIAF, alcaldes de municipios donde Proinpa hace trabajo de campo. Muchas organizaciones reciprocaron, entregando a Proinpa premios que ellos trajeron. Proinpa ha sobrevivido gracias a un buen liderazgo y a sus muchos amigos.

Entre los discursos, tuve la oportunidad de conocer al hombre sentado a mi lado, Lionel Ichazo, que supervisa tres fincas comerciales para una empresa molinera en las tierras bajas del este de Bolivia. Cultivan soya en verano y trigo y sorgo en invierno. Lionel confirm√≥ lo que Proinpa dice, que el uso de plaguicidas naturales se est√° disparando en las llanuras bajas. Lionel usa los plaguicidas naturales de Proinpa como tratamiento de semillas para controlar las enfermedades. Lionel, que tambi√©n es ingeniero agr√≥nomo y graduado de El Zamorano, una de las mejores universidades agr√≠colas de Am√©rica Latina (en Honduras), dijo que not√≥ c√≥mo el suelo ha ido mejorando durante los cuatro a√Īos que ha usado los microbios. Los microorganismos descompon√≠an los rastrojos en carbono que las plantas pod√≠an usar. Lionel a√Īadi√≥ que la mayor√≠a de los agricultores a gran escala siguen usando agroqu√≠micos en el tratamiento de semillas. Sin embargo, se est√° viendo que los productos biol√≥gicos funcionan, con precios accesibles y hasta m√°s baratos que los qu√≠micos. Por supuesto son m√°s sanos para el manipuleo y amigables con el medio ambiente. Y eso es la clave del √©xito de los productos. La demanda se est√° disparando.

Ha tomado muchos a√Īos de investigaci√≥n para producir plaguicidas biol√≥gicos que cuidan el medio ambiente y que puedan convencer a los agricultores comerciales para que empiecen a abandonar los productos agroqu√≠micos. Me acord√© de una √©poca, unos 15 a√Īos antes, cuando vi a Proinpa haciendo ensayos con agricultores cerca de Cochabamba. Aquella fue una etapa temprana de estos productos naturales con base cient√≠fica. La investigaci√≥n agr√≠cola es lenta por naturaleza, pero como un √°rbol frutal que tarda a√Īos en madurar, la espera vale la pena.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

No te comas las c√°scaras

Commercializing organic inputs

El mejor conocimiento es local y científico

Recuper√°ndose del boom de la quinua

Videos relacionados

Cómo hacer un abono biofoliar

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

La avispa que protege nuestros cultivos

Manejando la polilla de la papa

Agradecimientos

Paul Van Mele, Graham Thiele, Rolando Oros, Jorge Blajos y Lionel Ichazo leyeron e hicieron comentarios valiosos sobre una versión previa de este blog.

.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Design by Olean webdesign