WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Planting water May 5th, 2024 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

If a drier world needs more water, we may have to plant it ourselves. So, last week I took a course on how to do that. It was taught by my friends at Agroecología y Fe, a Bolivian NGO, which is doing applied, practical research on ways to plant and harvest water.

As we learned on the course, if the land is gently sloping, 0 to 6%, and if the bedrock is made of soft stone, rainwater can soak into it. The mountain slopes above the valleys of Cochabamba are made of soft, sedimentary rock, especially sandstone and shale. Many of the aquifers are short, just a few kilometers. Water that permeates the bedrock may emerge as a spring not far downhill. And the slower the water runs off the land, the more moisture sinks in.

The NGO’s name means “Agroecology and Faith.” And it must have taken a leap of faith eight years ago when they began to convince the people of the village of Chacapaya, Sipe, about an hour and a half from the city of Cochabamba, that there was a way to “plant water,” for their homes and gardens.

Marcelina Alarcón and Freddy Vargas, who are both agronomists with Agroecology and Faith, had worked with the community for years, on agroecological gardening projects. Still, it took a year to convince the people that there was a way to bring in more water. It was only after the local people saw that their springs and streams were starting to dry up, that they eventually agreed to try planting water.

They started by observing their land, hiking uphill from the springs. The oldest people, who knew the land well, showed Marcelina and Freddy were the water soaked in, or at least, where it used to soak in, before most of the vegetation had been removed by grazing animals and by cutting firewood.

They identified a plateau above the village, with five long, gently sloping depressions. In one of these places, called San Francisco, they dug shallow trenches with small machinery to slow the water. The community members also met to sign a document promising that in San Francisco they would not:

  1. Graze livestock
  2. Cut firewood
  3. Burn vegetation, or
  4. Plow up land for farming

As I learned from Germán Vargas, Freddy’s brother and the coordinator of Agroecology and Faith, those four commitments are the key to planting water. It sounds like a lot to ask, but Bolivians are now cooking with natural gas, even in the countryside, so firewood is less important. Children are going to school and don’t have time to herd sheep and goats. Many families have moved to the city, or commute there to work. They may still come home to plant crops, but are less interested in plowing up remote land for new fields. All of this means that there is less pressure on marginal lands, and an opportunity to use them to generate water.

When the course participants visited San Francisco, most of the water infiltration trenches were still holding water, even though it had not rained for weeks. It was hard to believe that just seven years earlier, this land had been bare, hardpacked soil. Now it was covered with native plants. Small trees were growing, not just the qhewiñas that the people had planted recently, but other species that were sprouting on their own, like khishwara, as well as brush, and grasses, including needle grass. Reforestation has worked so well that in January of 2024, the community dedicated another of their highland pastures to planting water.

Below San Francisco, there is a steep rocky slope, and at the base of that, a small spring that collects water from the plateau. When we saw the spring, it was gushing with clear water. Freddy explained that in 2017 this spring produced 2.3 liters of water per second. Every year it varied, with the rainfall, but the spring tended to hold more water every year. In 2024 it was running at about 5 liters per second, twice as much water in seven years.

The water from the spring feeds a stream that passes through Chacapaya, and the community has built tanks and tubes to distribute the water for drinking, irrigation and for livestock. Fortunately, the water benefits two communities. Below Chacapaya, the water flows into the River Pancuruma, which is dry most of the year. However, there is water just below the surface, where the residents of Chawarani, a neighborhood of the small city of Sipe Sipe, had dug a shallow well into the riverbed. Thanks in part to the water running off of San Francisco, the well is full of clear, clean water.

In 2023, donors helped pay for a large water tank (about 830,000 liters) in Chawarani, now filled by a solar pump, serving the community. The local people provided the labor and local materials for the project.

In these times when everything seems to be going wrong, I was glad to see that water can be managed creatively. This is a first experience, and yes, it has outside funding, but it’s proof of concept. Communities in other semi-arid parts of the world with degraded pasture on sloping land have an opportunity to use damaged lands to plant and harvest water. This is important in a warmer, drier world.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Ing. Germán Vargas, Ing. Marcelina Alarcón, and Ing. Freddy Vargas, who all work at Agroecología y Fe, for offering an excellent course, and for the inspiring work they do. This work is supported by Misereor, Trees for All, Wilde Ganzen Foundation, Helvetas, and Fundación Samay. Thanks also to Germán Vargas, Paul Van Mele, and Clara Bentley for reading and commenting on a previous version of this story.

Photos

The top photo is courtesy of Germán Vargas. The others are by Jeff Bentley.

Scientific names

Qhewiña is Polylepis spp. Khishwara is Buddleja spp. Needle grass is Stipa ichu.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Farming with trees

What counts in agroecology

Concrete negotiations

Gardening against all odds

Slow recovery

At home with agroforestry

Related videos

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Managed regeneration

Seeing the life in the soil

Road runoff harvesting

SEMBRAR AGUA

Por Jeff Bentley, 5 de mayo del 2024

Si un mundo más seco necesita más agua, quizá tengamos que sembrarla. La semana pasada asistí a un curso sobre cómo hacerlo. Lo impartieron mis amigos de Agroecología y Fe, una ONG boliviana que hace investigación aplicada y práctica sobre cómo sembrar, criar y cosechar agua.

Como aprendimos en el curso, si el terreno tiene una pendiente suave, del 0 al 6%, y si la piedra madre es blanda, el agua de lluvia puede infiltrarse. Las faldas de la cordillera alrededor de los valles de Cochabamba son de roca sedimentaria blanda, sobre todo arenisca y lutita. Muchos de los acuíferos son cortos, de unos pocos kilómetros. El agua que penetra la roca puede brotar en un manantial no muy lejos, cuesta abajo. Y si el agua corre más lento sobre la tierra, se infiltra más.

Los de la ONG Agroecología y Fe realmente mostraron algo de fe hace ocho años, cuando empezaron a convencer a los comuneros de Chacapaya, Sipe, a una hora y media de la ciudad de Cochabamba, de que había una forma de sembrar agua, para sus hogares y sus huertos.

Marcelina Alarcón y Freddy Vargas, ambos agrónomos de Agroecología y Fe, llevaban años trabajando con la comunidad en proyectos de huertos agroecológicos. Aun así, les costó un año convencer a la gente de que había una forma de traer más agua. Sólo después de que la gente viera que sus vertientes y ríos empezaban a secarse, quedaron en intentar sembrar y criar agua.

Empezaron por observar sus tierras, desplazándose cuesta arriba desde las vertientes. Los más ancianos, que conocían bien la tierra, mostraron a Marcelina y Freddy dónde se infiltraba el agua, o al menos, dónde solía infiltrarse, antes de que casi toda la vegetación había sido eliminada por el pastoreo y por la tala de leña.

Identificaron una meseta por encima de la comunidad, con cinco depresiones alargadas y suavemente inclinadas. En uno de estos lugares, llamado San Francisco, cavaron zanjas poco profundas con pequeña maquinaria para frenar el agua. Los miembros de la comunidad también se reunieron para firmar un documento en el que prometían que en San Francisco no harían lo siguiente:

  1. Pastorear animales
  2. Cortar leña
  3. Quemar vegetación, o
  4. Habilitar terreno para cultivos

Según aprendí de Germán Vargas, hermano de Freddy y coordinador de Agroecología y Fe, esos cuatro compromisos son la clave para sembrar agua. Parece mucho pedir, pero ahora los bolivianos cocinan con gas natural, incluso en el campo, así que la leña es menos importante. Los niños van a la escuela y no tienen tiempo para pastorear ovejas y cabras. Muchas familias se han trasladado a la ciudad o van allí para trabajar. A veces vuelven a sus lugares de origen para sembrar, pero están menos interesados en preparar tierras remotas para crear nuevas chacras. Todo esto significa que hay menos presión sobre las tierras marginales, lo cual es una oportunidad de usarlas para generar agua.

Cuando los participantes del curso visitaron San Francisco, la mayoría de las zanjas de infiltración todavía tenían agua, a pesar de que hacía semanas que no llovía. Era difícil creer que sólo siete años antes, esta tierra había sido un suelo desnudo y duro. Ahora estaba cubierto de plantas nativas. Crecían pequeños árboles, no sólo las qhewiñas que la gente había plantado recientemente, sino otras especies que habían nacido por sí solas, como el khishwara, y las t’olas (arbustos nativos), pastos, y la paja brava, La reforestación ha funcionado tan bien que, en enero de 2024, la comunidad dedicó otro de sus pastizales de altura a la siembra de agua.

Debajo de San Francisco hay una inclinación rocosa y, en su base, una pequeña vertiente que se alimenta con el agua de la meseta. Cuando vimos la vertiente, manaba un chorro de agua cristalina. Freddy nos explicó que en 2017 esta vertiente daba 2,3 litros de agua por segundo. Cada año variaba, con las lluvias, pero la vertiente tendía a tener más agua cada año. En 2024 llevaba unos 5 litros por segundo, el doble de agua hace siete años.

El agua de esta vertiente pasa por Chacapaya, donde la comunidad ha construido reservorios y un sistema de distribución en tubería para agua potable, riego y para animales domésticos. Felizmente, el agua beneficia a dos comunidades. Más abajo de Chacapaya, el agua desemboca en el Río Pancuruma, que está seco la mayor parte del año. Sin embargo, hay agua justo debajo de la superficie, donde los vecinos de Chawarani, un vecindario de la pequeña ciudad de Sipe, había excavado un pozo poco profundo, una galería filtrante, en el lecho del río. Gracias en parte al agua que fluye desde San Francisco, el pozo está lleno de agua cristalina y limpia.

En 2023, los donantes ayudaron a costear un gran depósito de agua (unos 830.000 litros) en Chawarani, que ahora se llena con una bomba solar y sirve a la comunidad. La población local aportó la mano de obra y los materiales locales para el proyecto.

En estos tiempos en que todo parece estar mal, me alegró ver que el agua puede manejarse de forma creativa. Se trata de una primera experiencia, y sí, tiene financiamiento externo, pero es una prueba de concepto. Los pueblos de otras zonas semiáridas del mundo con pastizales degradados en altura tienen la oportunidad de usar los terrenos dañados para sembrar y cosechar agua. Esto es importante en un mundo más caliente y más seco.

Agradecimientos

Gracias al Ing. Germán Vargas, Ing. Marcelina Alarcón, y al Ing. Freddy Vargas, quienes trabajan en Agroecología y Fe, por ofrecer un excelente curso, y por el inspirador trabajo que realizan. Este trabajo es apoyado por Misereor, Trees for All, Fundación Wilde Ganzen, Helvetas, y Fundación Samay. Gracias también a Germán Vargas, Paul Van Mele y Clara Bentley por leer y comentar una versión anterior de este artículo.

Fotos

La primera foto es cortesía de Germán Vargas. Las demás son de Jeff Bentley.

Nombres científicos

Qhewiña es Polylepis spp. Khishwara es Buddleja spp. Paja brava es Stipa ichu.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

La agricultura con árboles

Lo que cuenta en la agroecología

Negociaciones concretas

Un mejor futuro con jardines

Recuperación lenta

En casa con la agroforestería

Videos relevantes

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Regeneración manejada

Ver la vida en el suelo

Cosechando agua del camino

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Design by Olean webdesign