WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

The potato race September 18th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Last May, farmer and seed guardian, Domínica Cantorín, shed some light on potato mixes. She and her family grow over 80 varieties of potato, all mixed in their field.

I’ve heard several reasons for having a diversity of potatoes, ranging from allowing plant breeders to create the varieties of tomorrow, to the joy of eating many kinds of different potatoes. But doña Domínica had a new one: a mix of potatoes is more resistant to frost, hail and disease (especially late blight).

She described it as a kind of a race, or a contest. If a potato is surrounded by other varieties, each kind struggles to win the race, to grow the best. “When one potato sees that the one at its side is growing, he also pulls; he also grows. He does not let himself be beaten. It becomes like a race. They do not let themselves be beaten by the others. They also want to be there.”

This part of Peru is famous for growing many varieties. It is less widely appreciated that farmers tend to grow them in large mixes.

Under farmers’ conditions, it is possible that mixing varieties makes it harder for a certain pathogen strain to wipe out the whole lot, because some of the varieties will be more resistant than others to the disease. The healthy, resistant potatoes may keep the germs from spreading to the more susceptible varieties. It’s harder to explain why a mix of varieties growing together would help potatoes withstand cold weather. Yet such observations are borne of centuries of local observations and deserve at least the respect of any thoughtful hypothesis.

It has been my experience that farmers’ more unusual statements may be the most insightful. For example, in the 1980s, long before climate change was being mentioned, Honduran farmers were already telling me about how the rains were being delayed. For years they expected the rains to start on 3 May, on the Day of the Cross (El Día de la Cruz). In the 1980s farmers wondered if deforestation was warming the earth, and the hotter, unshaded soil was forcing the clouds higher. The farmers’ explanation of the mechanism of climate change may have been faulty, but they  were among the first members of the public to notice it.

So yes, a mix of potato varieties may well stay healthier than a field of just one variety, even though the mechanisms of protection from diseases may not (yet) be fully understood.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Native potatoes

Native potatoes, tasty and vulnerable

Potato marmalade

Making farmers anonymous

Watch the video:

Recovering Native Potatoes

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one, was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca and colleagues of the Grupo Yanapai for introducing us to the farmers of Junín, and for sharing their knowledge with us.

LA COMPETENCIA DE LAS PAPAS

Jeff Bentley, 18 de septiembre del 2022

El pasado mes de mayo, la agricultora y guardiana de las semillas, Domínica Cantorín, arrojó algo de luz sobre las mezclas de papas. Ella y su familia cultivan más de 80 variedades de papa, todas mezcladas en su campo.

He oído varias razones para tener una diversidad de papas, que van desde permitir a los fitomejoradores crear las variedades del mañana, hasta el placer de comer muchos tipos de papas diferentes. Pero doña Domínica tenía una nueva razón: una mezcla de papas es más resistente a las heladas, el granizo y las enfermedades (especialmente el tizón tardío).

Lo describió como una especie de carrera o concurso. Si una papa está rodeada de otras variedades, cada una lucha por ganar la carrera, por ser la mejor. “Cuando una papa ve que la que está a su lado crece, también jala; también crece. No se deja vencer. Se convierte en una competencia. No se dejan ganar por las otras. Ellos también quieren estar ahí”.

Esta parte de Perú es famosa por cultivar muchas variedades. Se aprecia menos que los agricultores tienden a cultivarlas en grandes mezclas.

En las condiciones de los agricultores, es posible que la mezcla de variedades haga más difícil que una determinada cepa de patógeno acabe con todo el lote, porque algunas de las variedades serán más resistentes que otras a la enfermedad. Las papas sanas y resistentes pueden impedir que los gérmenes se propaguen a las variedades más susceptibles. Es más difícil explicar por qué una mezcla de variedades que crecen juntas ayudaría a las papas a resistir el frío. Sin embargo, estas observaciones son fruto de siglos de observaciones locales y merecen al menos el respeto de cualquier hipótesis reflexiva.

Según mi experiencia, las declaraciones más inusuales de los agricultores pueden ser las más perspicaces. Por ejemplo, en la década de 1980, antes de que se hablara mucho del cambio climático, los agricultores hondureños ya me contaban que se estaban retrasando las lluvias. Durante años esperaban que las lluvias comenzaran el 3 de mayo, en el Día de la Cruz. En los años ochenta, los agricultores se preguntaban si la deforestación estaba calentando la tierra y si el suelo, más caliente y sin sombra, obligaba a las nubes a subir. Puede que la explicación de los agricultores sobre el mecanismo del cambio climático fuera errónea, pero eran algunos de los primeros miembros del público en darse cuenta.

Así que sí, una mezcla de variedades de papa puede ser más saludable que un campo de una sola variedad, aunque los mecanismos de protección contra las enfermedades no se comprendan (todavía) del todo.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Papas nativas

Papas nativas, sabrosas y vulnerables

Mermelada de papa

Making farmers anonymous

Vea el video:

Recovering Native Potatoes

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos, incluso este, fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca y colegas del Grupo Yanapai por presentarnos a los agricultores de Junín y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros.

 

Native potatoes September 11th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Peru’s native potatoes are a living treasure of 4,000 varieties that come in red, purple, yellow and black. Round or long, smooth or knobby, each one is different, and tasty. But for years, city people ignored the native potato, considered to be the inferior food of poor people.

Some farmers and their allies are fighting to keep the native potato alive. Over 20 years ago, Peruvian agronomist Raúl Ccanto was one of the people who realized that native potatoes could survive, if people in the city would buy them.

A brand name was created, Mishki Papa—roughly translating as “tasty potato”, and the little tubers were displayed in a net bag, so customers could see their unique beauty. To produce the potatoes, 50 farmers were organized into the newly created Association of the Guardians of Native Potatoes of Peru (Aguapan).

I told Raúl that I used to buy these potatoes at an upscale supermarket when I lived in Peru in 2010. Raúl explained that Aguapan was no longer selling through the supermarket, which would only pay for the potatoes two weeks after they had taken delivery and would return any unsold ones, paying the farmers only 1.30 soles (about 30 cents of a dollar), while charging customers 4.30 soles. Perhaps most discouraging, the supermarket only accepted three or four varieties of potatoes, while farmers grew dozens. As Raúl explained, if consumers only bought four varieties, the others would still be endangered.

In recent years, two European farmers’ organizations (Agrico and HZCP) have each given Aguapan 15,000 Euros to help them market potatoes. Paul and Marcella and I visited the president of Aguapan, Elmer Chávez, while he harvested native potatoes with his family in the village of Vista Alegre, in Huancavelica, at 3,900 meters above sea level (12,800 feet). At this staggering altitude, where we struggled just to breathe and walk at the same time, the Chávez family was hard at work, carefully unearthing each variety..

From each of the 80 varieties, the family saves five potatoes as seed for next year. The rest are to eat at home and to sell. The family works hard against a deadline. We were there on a Friday, and on Monday morning don Elmer had to be at a trucking company in Huancayo, 30 km away, to ship half a ton of potatoes.

In Lima, representatives of Yanapai (an NGO that collaborates with Aguapan) will receive the potatoes, advertise them on social media, keep them in a warehouse and take orders from individual customers. On the following Friday, the potatoes will be sold in two-kilo net bags, with as many as 18 varieties in each little sack. Raúl explains that this is called a chaqru (from the Quechua word for “mix”). Each farm family produces its own special mix, selected over the years to have the same cooking time, and to combine nicely on the plate.

To promote the potatoes, Yanapai has made a catalog of the varieties and a booklet describing individual farmers and the unique mix of potatoes that each one has.

As agronomist Edgar Olivera of Yanapai explains, the delivery service still requires some financial and technical support, but the hope is that one day it will be self-sustaining. Many farmers have grown children who now live in the big, capital city of Lima. Some of the children of farmers may one day be able to earn money selling the native potatoes from their home villages, turning the gem-like potatoes of their parents into a real source of income for the families who nurture them.

Further reading

Ministerio de Agricultura y Riego (MINAGRI); Grupo Yanapai; Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria (INIA); Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). 2017. Catálogo de variedades de papa nativa del sureste del departamento de Junín – Perú. Lima. Centro Internacional de la Papa. ISBN 978-92-9060-208-8. 228 p. https://cgspace.cgiar.org/handle/10568/89110

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Native potatoes, tasty and vulnerable

Potato marmalade

Making farmers anonymous

Watch the video:

Recovering Native Potatoes

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one, was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca and colleagues of the Grupo Yanapai for introducing us to the farmers of Aguapan and for sharing their knowledge with us.

PAPAS NATIVAS

Por Jeff Bentley, 11 de septiembre del 2022

Las papas nativas de Perú son un tesoro vivo de 4.000 variedades, entre rojas, moradas, amarillas y negras. Redondas o largas, lisas o nudosas, cada una es diferente, y sabrosa. Pero durante años, la gente de la ciudad ignoró la papa nativa, considerada como el alimento inferior de los pobres.

Algunos agricultores y sus aliados luchan por mantener viva la papa nativa. Hace más de 20 años, el ingeniero agrónomo peruano Raúl Ccanto era una de las personas que se dieron cuenta de que la papa nativa podía sobrevivir si la gente de la ciudad la compraba.

Se creó una marca, Mishki Papa—que se traduce aproximadamente como “papa sabrosa”— y los pequeños tubérculos se presentaban en una bolsa de red para que los clientes pudieran apreciar su belleza. Para producir las papas, 50 agricultores se organizaron en la recién creada Asociación Nacional de Guardianes de la Papa Nativa de Perú (Aguapan).

Le dije a Raúl que yo solía comprar estas papas en un supermercado bien surtido cuando vivía en Perú en 2010. Raúl me explicó que Aguapan ya no vendía a través del supermercado, que sólo pagaba las papas dos semanas después de recibirlas y devolvía las que no se vendían, pagando a los agricultores sólo 1,30 soles (unos 30 centavos de dólar), mientras que cobraba a los clientes 4,30 soles. Lo más desalentador es que el supermercado sólo aceptaba tres o cuatro variedades de papas, mientras que los agricultores cultivaban docenas. Como explicó Raúl, si los consumidores sólo compraran cuatro variedades, las demás seguirían en peligro de extinción.

En los últimos años, dos organizaciones europeas de agricultores (Agrico y HZCP) han dado a Aguapan 15.000 euros cada una para ayudarles a comercializar las papas. Paul, Marcella y yo visitamos al presidente de Aguapan, Elmer Chávez, mientras cosechaba papas nativas con su familia en el pueblo de Vista Alegre, en Huancavelica, a 3.900 metros sobre el nivel del mar. A esta increíble altitud, en la que nos costaba respirar y caminar al mismo tiempo, la familia Chávez se entusiasmaba de desenterrar cuidadosamente cada variedad.

De cada una de las 80 variedades, la familia guarda cinco papas como semilla para el próximo año. El resto son para la olla o para la venta. La familia trabaja duro con un plazo límite. Estuvimos allí un viernes, y el lunes por la mañana don Elmer tenía que estar en una empresa de transportes de Huancayo, a 30 km, para enviar media tonelada de papas.

En Lima, los representantes de Yanapai (una ONG que colabora con Aguapan) recibirán las papas, las anunciarán en las redes sociales, las guardarán en un almacén y tomarán los pedidos de los clientes particulares. El viernes siguiente, las papas se venderán en bolsas de red de dos kilos, con hasta 18 variedades en cada pequeño saco. Raúl explica que esto se llama chaqru (de la palabra quechua para “mezcla”). Cada familia campesina produce su propia mezcla especial, seleccionada a lo largo de los años para que tenga el mismo tiempo de cocción, y para que combine bien en el plato.

Para promocionar sus papas, Yanapai ha publicado un catálogo de las variedades y un folleto en el que se describe a cada agricultor y la mezcla única de papas que tiene cada persona.

Como explica el ingeniero Edgar Olivera, de Yanapai, el servicio de entrega aún requiere cierto apoyo financiero y técnico, pero la esperanza es que algún día sea autosuficiente. Muchos agricultores tienen hijos mayores que ahora viven en la ciudad capital de Lima, y es posible que algunos de ellos puedan algún día ganar dinero vendiendo las papas nativas de sus pueblos de origen, convirtiendo esta riqueza genética en una fuente de ingresos para las familias que la cultiva.

Lectura adicional

Ministerio de Agricultura y Riego (MINAGRI); Grupo Yanapai; Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria (INIA); Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). 2017. Catálogo de variedades de papa nativa del sureste del departamento de Junín – Perú. Lima. Centro Internacional de la Papa. ISBN 978-92-9060-208-8. 228 p. https://cgspace.cgiar.org/handle/10568/89110

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Papas nativas, deliciosas y vulnerables

Mermelada de papa

Making farmers anonymous

Vea el video:

Recuperemos las Papas Nativas

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos, incluso este, fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca y colegas del Grupo Yanapai por presentarnos a los miembros de Aguapan y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros.

From soil fertility to cheese September 4th, 2022 by

From soil fertility to cheese

Nederlandse versie hieronder

More than 10 years ago, a project in the high Andes in Peru set out to improve soil fertility with local communities. So, during a recent visit to the community of Colpar, in Quilcas municipality, we were surprised to hear rural women talk about how they had established a women’s association selling cheese and yoghurt. It seemed a long leap at first, but as we spent more time with the community we were reminded once more how development impacts can divert from initial intentions.

Jeff, Marcella and I had a chance to work with the local NGO Yanapai on a video about improved pastures. Farmers traditionally left their fields fallow for 10 years or more after they had planted potatoes for a year, followed by a year of oca, ulluco, broad beans or another crop. With increased pressure on the land, fallow periods shortened and soil fertility declined. The initial idea of the researchers was that by broadcasting seeds of legume fodder crops and improved grasses, such as rye grass after the last harvest, would help the  soil recover its fertility faster. This idea, as creative it was, never quite worked out.

But the researchers and NGO staff did not give up and kept on engaging the farmers in their trials. Farmers gradually started to drive the agenda. Especially in areas where farmers had access to irrigation water, they began experimenting with mixed pastures, containing a mix of annual and perennial fodder legumes and grasses, such as oats, barley, rye grass, clover, alfalfa and vetch.

All farmers in Quilcas now have semi-permanent fields of fodder, which they establish at different times of the year to have feed all year round, as Ricardina Rodríguez, one of the local women tells us: “Natural pasture dries up in the dry season, and there is nothing for the cows to eat. Planted fodder is there all year. We cut it every two months, and it maintains our cows.”

When we interview Herminio Rodríguez, he explains how their animals prefer a mix of fodder: “When you have a mix of pastures, they eat everything. And when you feed a mix with clover and alfalfa, the cows also give more milk.”

The farmers we meet all confirm that after 3 to 4 years the mixed pastures have improved the fertility of the soil, as the grasses with their abundant roots make the soil looser, while the legumes fix nitrogen from the air and as such benefit the subsequent potato crop. The farmers also add a bit of kitchen ash or composted manure after they cut fodder, which also improves the soil fertility.

The project had evolved from enriching native fallow vegetation with improved fodder species, to one where farmers installed and cared for their pasture as if it were a crop, fertilizing, irrigating and harvesting it. Some farmers may even keep some of their fields under permanent fodder, as they feel the benefits of having good fodder outweighs the benefits of harvesting more potatoes.

With additional support of two other projects, including a local government project, that focused on livestock, fodder and irrigation, life in the community steadily improved, and women made the most of it. While they used to sell all their fresh milk to a buyer from the nearby town, they realized that they could make more money by making and selling their own cheese and yoghurt.

“We used to heat the milk with firewood, but now we use gas. We have our big pots, our cheese press. We improve all the time. And once a week we prepare cheese and yoghurt to take to the weekly market,” says Ricardina Rodríguez.

Lucía Ávila, another member of the association who we interview on camera, summarises it well: “I would tell all farmers that we should plant pasture to have better animals, and to have a little money. If you have a bigger guinea pig, they pay you well. If your bull is bigger or fatter, they pay you well. Cultivated fodder is better to improve our quality of life.”

By having an open mindset, a certain degree of flexibility and long-term support to work with farming communities, researchers working with local NGOs can have tremendous impact that goes way beyond what they had anticipated initially.

 

Watch the video on the Access Agriculture video platform:
Improved pasture for fertile soil

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Farming as a lifestyle

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos with farmers like doña Ricardina, doña Lucía and don Herminio was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Edgar Olivera from Grupo Yanapai for introducing us to the community, and to Erik Córdova Ramos for the photo of the Agro-Insight team with colleagues from Yanapai.

 

Van bodemvruchtbaarheid tot kaas

Meer dan 10 jaar geleden werd een project in de hoge Andes in Peru opgezet om samen met de plaatselijke gemeenschappen de vruchtbaarheid van de bodem te verbeteren. Tijdens een recent bezoek aan de gemeenschap van Colpar, in de gemeente Quilcas, waren we dan ook verrast toen we plattelandsvrouwen hoorden vertellen over hoe ze een vrouwenvereniging hadden opgericht die kaas en yoghurt verkoopt. Het leek eerst een lange sprong, maar toen we meer tijd met de gemeenschap doorbrachten, werden we er weer eens aan herinnerd hoe de gevolgen van ontwikkeling kunnen afwijken van de oorspronkelijke bedoelingen.

Jeff, Marcella en ik hadden de kans om met de plaatselijke NGO Yanapai te werken aan een video over verbeterde weidegronden. Traditioneel lieten boeren hun akkers 10 jaar of langer braak liggen nadat ze een jaar lang aardappels hadden geplant, gevolgd door een jaar oca, ulluco, tuinbonen of een ander gewas. Door de toenemende druk op het land werden de braakperiodes korter en ging de bodemvruchtbaarheid achteruit. Het oorspronkelijke idee van de onderzoekers was dat door na de laatste oogst zaden van voederleguminosen en verbeterde grassen, zoals raaigras, uit te strooien, de bodem zijn vruchtbaarheid sneller zou herstellen. Dit idee, hoe creatief het ook was, heeft nooit helemaal gewerkt.

Maar de onderzoekers en de NGO-medewerkers gaven niet op en bleven de boeren bij hun proeven betrekken. Geleidelijk aan begonnen de boeren de agenda te bepalen. Vooral in gebieden waar de boeren toegang hadden tot irrigatiewater, begonnen zij te experimenteren met gemengde weidegronden, met een mix van eenjarige en meerjarige voederleguminosen en grassen, zoals haver, gerst, raaigras, klaver, alfalfa en wikke.

Alle boeren in Quilcas hebben nu semi-permanente voedergewassenvelden, die ze op verschillende tijdstippen van het jaar aanleggen, zodat ze het hele jaar door voedergewassen hebben, zoals Ricardina Rodríguez, een van de plaatselijke vrouwen, ons vertelt: “Natuurlijke weiden drogen op in het droge seizoen, en er is niets te eten voor de koeien. Geplant veevoer is er het hele jaar. We maaien het om de twee maanden, en het onderhoudt onze koeien.”

Als we Herminio Rodríguez interviewen, legt hij uit hoe hun dieren de voorkeur geven aan een mix van voedergewassen: “Als je een mix van voedergewassen hebt, eten ze alles. En als je een mix met klaver en luzerne voert, geven de koeien ook meer melk.”

De boeren die we ontmoeten, bevestigen allemaal dat de gemengde weiden na 3 tot 4 jaar de vruchtbaarheid van de bodem hebben verbeterd, omdat de grassen met hun overvloedige wortels de grond losser maken, terwijl de peulvruchten stikstof uit de lucht vastleggen en als zodanig ten goede komen aan de daaropvolgende aardappeloogst. De boeren voegen ook een beetje keuken-as of gecomposteerde mest toe nadat zij het voeder hebben gemaaid, wat de bodemvruchtbaarheid eveneens verbetert.

Het project is geëvolueerd van het verrijken van inheemse braakvegetatie met verbeterde voedergewassen tot een project waarbij de boeren hun weiland installeren en verzorgen alsof het een gewas is, bemesten, irrigeren en oogsten. Sommige boeren houden zelfs een deel van hun akkers permanent met voedergewassen bedekt, omdat zij vinden dat de voordelen van goed voedergewas opwegen tegen de voordelen van het oogsten van meer aardappelen.

Met extra steun van twee andere projecten, waaronder een project van de plaatselijke overheid, die zich richtten op vee, veevoeder en irrigatie, verbeterde het leven in de gemeenschap gestaag, en de vrouwen haalden daar het meeste uit. Terwijl ze vroeger al hun verse melk verkochten aan een opkoper uit de nabijgelegen stad, realiseerden ze zich dat ze meer geld konden verdienen door hun eigen kaas en yoghurt te maken en te verkopen.

“Vroeger verwarmden we de melk met brandhout, maar nu gebruiken we gas. We hebben onze grote potten, onze kaaspers. We verbeteren de hele tijd. En één keer per week maken we kaas en yoghurt om mee te nemen naar de wekelijkse markt,” zegt Ricardina Rodríguez.

Lucía Ávila, een ander lid van de vereniging die we voor de camera interviewen, vat het goed samen: “Ik zou tegen alle boeren willen zeggen dat we weiland moeten planten om betere dieren te hebben, en om een beetje geld te hebben. Als je een grotere cavia hebt, betalen ze je goed. Als je stier groter of vetter is, betalen ze je goed. Gekweekt voer is beter om de kwaliteit van ons leven te verbeteren.”

Door een open mentaliteit, een zekere mate van flexibiliteit en steun op lange termijn om met boerengemeenschappen samen te werken, kunnen onderzoekers die met lokale NGO’s samenwerken een enorme impact hebben die veel verder gaat dan wat ze aanvankelijk hadden voorzien.

Bekijk de video op het Access Agriculture video platform:
Improved pasture for fertile soil

Creativity of the commons August 28th, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

Farmers and scientists should be able to work together to create practical, new technologies, but it’s easier said than done. So, I was pleased to see a clear example recently, in Peru.

Peruvian agronomists, Edgar Olivera and Raúl Ccanto, have been working in the municipality of Quilcas near Huancayo since about 2002. The farmers were poor, and the land couldn’t sustain them. Farmers would grow potatoes for a year, followed by some other crop like ulluco, or broad beans or oats. Then the soil fertility would be exhausted and the land would remain fallow for several years, producing a poor-quality fodder that left the cows hungry.

I was lucky enough to go to Quilcas in 2013, nearly ten years ago, when two soil scientists, Steve Vanek and Steve Fonte teamed up with Edgar and Raúl and the farmers of Quilcas.

Raúl and Edgar convened a community workshop and (thanks to the goodwill that they had established with the farmers) many people from Quilcas attended. Steve and Steve proposed that after farmers harvested their second crop, instead of leaving it fallow, they could plant a mix of pastures: grasses and legumes—annuals and perennials. In the experiment, some of the plots would be fertilized and others would not be. The farmers responded enthusiastically, and they agreed to lend some of their land and their time to the experiments.

Edgar and Raúl continued to work in Quilcas and other highland communities. The Steves kept making visits from the universities where they taught in the United States. They often brought graduate students. Meanwhile, after years of hard work and some government support, the community managed to dig an irrigation canal into Quilcas, which was finished in 2018.

I never went back to Quilcas until this year (2022) and I was pleasantly surprised. Many of the farmers in the village of Collpar (part of Quilcas) were using some version of the new fodder mix. After harvesting their potatoes, they plant a second crop. Then they plant a mix of several kinds of grasses (like oats and rye grass) and legumes (such as vetch and alfalfa). The oats and the vetch are annuals, while the rye grass and the alfalfa are perennials. The oats and the vetch are harvested first, while the rye grass and the alfalfa live for another three to five years. A little irrigation helps the plants to thrive, as does a bit of guinea pig manure or some wood ash from the kitchen. The fodder is cut and taken to the animals, which do not graze on the small plots.

Local farmer Marcelo Tiza showed us the rich, dark soil beneath the fodder crops, full of earthworms and other life. Another farmer, Ricardina Rodríguez explained that the fodder allowed the women to have healthier cows and to start a cheese-making group. Most of the farmers are now raising guinea pigs and dairy cows commercially.

The success with animals is built on the community’s efforts with irrigation and new fodder systems. Along the way the farmers have adapted new ideas to their own context, selecting the fodder species that work for them, and figuring out how to water, and fertilize the fodder crop, and how to turn it into products they can eat or sell. When farmers and scientists collaborate well, they each contribute ideas. In this case, the agricultural scientists proposed new fodder species, and a new style of mixing them, but they wanted to plant the fodder in large, unirrigated lands at the start of a long period of several years’ fallow. The farmers added the idea of irrigating the new crops, fertilizing them, and planting them in small plots. In other words, the collaboration yielded an idea that neither party may have thought of on their own.

“Our original concept was to address the outlying, degradation-prone areas as well,” says Steve Vanek. Unfortunately, the fodder plants that thrived near the farmsteads didn’t do well in the distant plots. “Farmers are also sensitive to the idea that for larger, outlying plots erosion and degradation are a real risk. They understood that species such as orchardgrass can complement the slower establishment of native grasses and legumes to better protect the soils.” This is a topic that researchers and farmers hope to tackle in future.

Fodder plants perform well in mixed communities, protecting and supporting each other. In the same way, a mix of farmers, agronomists, and soil scientists can stimulate each other with new ideas, eventually reaching solutions that none of the groups would have thought of alone. Given with slow rhythms of crops and livestock, this meaningful collaboration may take several years to pay off, but it is worth it.

Watch the video

Improved pasture for fertile soil

Further reading

Meza, Katherin, Steven J. Vanek, Yulissa Sueldo, Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, María Scurrah, and Steven J. Fonte 2022 Grass-legume mixtures show potential to increase above-and belowground biomass production for Andean forage-based fallows. Agronomy 12(1): 142.

Meza, Katherin, Steven J. Vanek, Raúl Ccanto Retamozo, María Scurrah, Edgar Olivera Hurtado, and Steven J. Fonte 2017 Importancia de los servicios ecosistémicos en un paisaje andino de la Sierra Central del Perú. Revista LEISA 33(1): 15.

Vanek, Steven J., Katherin Meza, Raul Ccanto, Edgar Olivera, Maria Scurrah, and Steven J. Fonte 2020 Participatory design of improved forage/fallow options across soil gradients with farmers of the Central Peruvian Andes. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 300: 106933.

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Rotational grazing

The committee of the commons

Moveable pasture

A better way to make holes

Scientific names

Oat (Avena sativa), ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), vetch (Vicia dasycarpa), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata),

Acknowledgements

The visit to Peru to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one, was made possible with the kind support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca and colleagues of the Grupo Yanapai for introducing us to Quilcas and for sharing their knowledge with us. Steve Vanek and Paul Van Mele read and made valuable comments on an earlier version of this story.

CREATIVIDAD COLECTIVA

Jeff Bentley, 21 de agosto del 2022

Lógicamente, los agricultores y los científicos deberían poder trabajar juntos para crear nuevas tecnologías prácticas, pero es más fácil decirlo que hacerlo. Por eso, me encantó ver un claro ejemplo recientemente, en el Perú.

Los agrónomos peruanos Edgar Olivera y Raúl Ccanto trabajan en el municipio de Quilcas, cerca de Huancayo, desde el 2002. Los agricultores eran pobres y la tierra no podía mantenerlos. Los agricultores cultivaban papas un año, seguidas de otro cultivo como el ulluco, las habas o la avena. Luego, la fertilidad del suelo se agotaba y dejaban la tierra en descanso por varios años, produciendo un forraje de mala calidad que dejaba a las vacas flacas.

Tuve la suerte de ir a Quilcas en el 2013, hace casi diez años, cuando dos científicos de suelo, Steve Vanek y Steve Fonte, se unieron con Edgar y Raúl y los agricultores de Quilcas.

Raúl y Edgar convocaron un taller comunitario y (gracias a la buena voluntad que habían establecido con la gente local) y asistieron muchas personas de Quilcas. Steve y Steve propusieron que después de que se recogiera la segunda cosecha, en lugar de dejarla en descanso, plantaran una mezcla de pastos: gramíneas y leguminosas, anuales y perennes. En el experimento, algunas de las parcelas se abonarían y otras no. Los agricultores respondieron con entusiasmo y aceptaron prestar parte de sus tierras y su tiempo para los experimentos.

Edgar y Raúl siguieron trabajando en Quilcas y otras comunidades de la Sierra. Los Steve siguieron visitando desde las universidades donde enseñaban en los Estados Unidos. A menudo traían estudiantes de posgrado. Mientras tanto, tras años de duro trabajo y algo de apoyo gubernamental, la comunidad logró cavar un canal de riego en Quilcas, que se terminó en el 2018.

Yo no volví a Quilcas hasta este año (2022) y era una sorpresa agradable. Muchas de las familias de la comunidad de Collpar (que forma parte de Quilcas) usaban alguna versión de la nueva mezcla forrajera. Después de cosechar las papas, sembraban otro cultivo. Luego sembraban una mezcla de varios tipos de gramíneas (como la avena y el ray gras) y leguminosas (como la vicia y la alfalfa). La avena y la vicia son anuales, mientras que el ray gras y la alfalfa son perennes. La avena y la vicia se cosechan primero, mientras que el ray gras y la alfalfa viven de tres a cinco años más. Un poco de riego ayuda a las plantas a prosperar, así como un poco de estiércol de cuy o algo de ceniza de leña de la cocina. El forraje se corta y se lleva a los animales, que no pastorean en las pequeñas parcelas.

El agricultor local Marcelo Tiza nos mostró la rica tierra negra que hay donde los cultivos de forraje, llena de lombrices y otros seres vivos. Otra agricultora, Ricardina Rodríguez, explicó que el forraje permitió a las mujeres tener vacas más sanas y crear un grupo que hace queso. La mayoría de los agricultores se dedican ahora a la cría comercial de cuyes y vacas lecheras.

El éxito con los animales se basa en los esfuerzos de la comunidad con el riego y los nuevos sistemas de forraje. Ajustando la carga sobre el camino, los agricultores han adaptado las nuevas ideas a su propio contexto, seleccionando las especies de forraje que les funcionan, y averiguando cómo regar y fertilizar el cultivo de forraje, y cómo convertirlo en productos que puedan comer o vender. Cuando los agricultores y los científicos colaboran bien, cada uno aporta ideas. En este caso, los científicos agrícolas propusieron nuevas especies forrajeras y un nuevo estilo de mezclarlas, pero querían sembrar el forraje en grandes tierras de secano al comienzo de un largo período de varios años de descanso. Los agricultores añadieron la idea de regar los nuevos cultivos, abonarlos y sembrarlos en parcelas pequeñas. En otras palabras, la colaboración dio lugar a una idea que a ninguna de las partes se le habría ocurrido por sí sola.

“Nuestro concepto original era abordar también las zonas lejanas, sujetas a la degradación”, dice Steve Vanek. Por desgracia, las plantas forrajeras que prosperaban cerca de las viviendas no funcionaban bien en las parcelas lejanas. “Los agricultores también son sensibles a la idea de que para las parcelas más grandes y alejadas la erosión y la degradación son un riesgo real. Comprendieron que especies como la dactilis pueden complementar el establecimiento más lento de las gramíneas y leguminosas para proteger mejor los suelos.” Este es un tema que investigadores y agricultores esperan abordar en el futuro.

Las plantas forrajeras se comportan bien en comunidades mixtas, protegiéndose y apoyándose mutuamente. Del mismo modo, una mezcla de agricultores, agrónomos y científicos de suelo puede estimularse mutuamente con nuevas ideas, llegando finalmente a soluciones que ninguno de los grupos habría pensado por sí solo. Dado el lento ritmo de los cultivos y el ganado, esta colaboración puede tardar varios años en dar sus frutos, pero vale la pena.

Ver el video

Suelos fértiles con pastos mejorados

Lectura adicional

Meza, Katherin, Steven J. Vanek, Yulissa Sueldo, Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, María Scurrah, y Steven J. Fonte 2022 Grass-legume mixtures show potential to increase above-and belowground biomass production for Andean forage-based fallows. Agronomy 12(1): 142.

Meza, Katherin, Steven J. Vanek, Raúl Ccanto Retamozo, María Scurrah, Edgar Olivera Hurtado, y Steven J. Fonte 2017 Importancia de los servicios ecosistémicos en un paisaje andino de la Sierra Central del Perú. Revista LEISA 33(1): 15.

Vanek, Steven J., Katherin Meza, Raul Ccanto, Edgar Olivera, Maria Scurrah, y Steven J. Fonte 2020 Participatory design of improved forage/fallow options across soil gradients with farmers of the Central Peruvian Andes. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 300: 106933.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

Rotational grazing

Comité campesino

Pasto movible

Mejores agujeros para sembrar pasto

Nombres científicos

Avena (Avena sativa), ray grass (Lolium multiflorum), vicia (Vicia dasycarpa), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), dactilis (Dactylis glomerata)

Agradecimiento

Nuestra visita al Perú para filmar varios videos, incluso este, fue posible gracias al generoso apoyo del Programa Colaborativo de Investigación de Cultivos (CCRP) de la Fundación McKnight. Gracias a Edgar Olivera, Raúl Ccanto, Jhon Huaraca y colegas del Grupo Yanapai por presentarnos a Quilcas y por compartir su conocimiento con nosotros. Steve Vanek y Paul Van Mele hicieron comentarios valiosos sobre una versión previa de este relato.

From family farm to family firm August 21st, 2022 by

Vea la versión en español a continuación

In Peru, one way to save endangered, native potatoes is by selling and eating them. I recently learned that some restaurant owners are buying native potatoes directly from farmers. Paul and Marcella and I went with local agronomist Raúl Ccanto to meet Guido Villegas, the Huancayo city official in charge of promoting food security and local commerce. He told us that the government of Peru has a program to feed children (Qali Wamru: “vigorous child”) where the national government sends foodstuffs that can be easily stored and transported. The city of Huancayo supplements these by buying local fresh food and vegetables, including native potatoes, to prepare school breakfasts and lunches for the kids. “We were pioneers in these direct purchases,” explained Mr. Guido.

He added that the city is also interested in supporting biodiversity, agroecology and family farming. Every year on National Potato Day (30 May), there is a fair in the city of Huancayo, where the local government puts individual restaurant owners in touch with smallholder farmers.

So we drove over to El Costillar, a family restaurant in downtown Huancayo, and introduced ourselves to Percy Bráñez, the owner. The place was spotless, well-lit and it only had four tables, making it a perfect place for a quite lunch. Percy seemed delighted to have a film crew drop by uninvited, and he thoughtfully went from table to table, asking the customers if they minded if we filmed while they ate.

Percy graciously gave us some of his signature, local food: mote (hominy), boiled native potatoes, fresh salsa, fried sweetpotatoes and possibly the world’s finest chicharrón (pork fried in its own fat).

Percy explained that he has been in business for 20 years, following in the tradition of his father, who started a similar restaurant 50 years ago. Confirming what Guido had said, Percy told how he met two farmers at the fair on national potato day. He asked for their phone numbers, and now, whenever he needs potatoes, he gives them a ring, and they bring the produce right to the restaurant’s door.

Percy buys a little over 100 kilos a week. He takes whatever variety of native potatoes the farmers have. He seems to enjoy serving this diversity in his locally-themed restaurant.

There is a transaction cost for the farmers, who have to make the trip to town, but the drivers of small, country buses are usually happy to take a sack of potatoes as luggage. The two farmers have a ready market; the restaurant gets a steady supply, and by cutting out the middleperson, they reach a price higher than what the farmer would get from the wholesaler, but lower than what the restaurant would pay in the market.

Restaurants and other family firms are a natural outlet for family farms, bringing fresh, local food to nearby cities. And local governments can help to put smallholders in touch with potential customers, who can then deal directly with each other. Restaurant owners can simply phone the farmers when they need produce. This kind of direct marketing was unthinkable thirty years ago, when Latin American farmers barely had access to any phones at all, let alone to a handset in their pocket.

Previous Agro-Insight blogs

A market to nurture local food culture

Choosing to farm

Watch the video

Recovering native potatoes

DE LA AGRICULTURA FAMILIAR AL RESTAURANTE FAMILIAR

Jeff Bentley, 21 de agosto del 2022

En Perú, una forma de rescatar las papas nativas en peligro de extinción es venderlas y comerlas. Hace poco me enteré de que algunos dueños de restaurantes compran papas nativas directamente a los agricultores. Paul, Marcella y yo fuimos con el Ing. Raúl Ccanto a conocer a Guido Villegas, el funcionario de la ciudad de Huancayo encargado de promover la seguridad alimentaria y el comercio local. Nos contó que el gobierno de Perú tiene un programa para alimentar a los niños (Qali Wamru: “niño vigoroso”) en el que el gobierno nacional envía alimentos que se pueden almacenar y transportar fácilmente. La ciudad de Huancayo los complementa comprando alimentos y verduras frescas locales, incluidas las papas nativas, para preparar los desayunos y almuerzos escolares de los niños. “Fuimos pioneros en estas compras directas”, explicó el Sr. Guido.

Añadió que la ciudad también está interesada en apoyar la biodiversidad, la agroecología y la agricultura familiar. Todos los años, en el Día Nacional de la Papa (30 de mayo), se celebra una feria en la ciudad de Huancayo, donde el gobierno local pone en contacto a dueños de restaurantes con agricultores familiares.

Así que nos dirigimos a El Costillar, un restaurante familiar en el centro de Huancayo, y nos presentamos a Percy Bráñez, el propietario. El local estaba impecable, bien iluminado y sólo tenía cuatro mesas, lo que lo convertía en un lugar perfecto para un almuerzo tranquilo. El Sr. Percy parecía encantado de que un equipo de rodaje se pasara por allí sin ser invitado, y fue de mesa en mesa preguntando atentamente a los clientes si les importaba que les grabáramos mientras comían.

El Sr. Percy amablemente nos invitó algunos de sus platos típicos: mote, papas cocidas, salsa fresca, camote frito y posiblemente el mejor chicharrón del mundo.

Percy explicó que lleva 20 años en el negocio, siguiendo la tradición de su padre, que abrió un restaurante similar hace 50 años. Confirmando lo que Guido había dicho, Percy contó que conoció a dos agricultores en la feria el día nacional de la papa. Les pidió sus números de teléfono y ahora, cada vez que necesita papas, les llama y le traen el producto a la puerta del restaurante.

Percy compra algo más de 100 kilos a la semana. Acepta cualquier variedad de papas nativas que tengan los agricultores. Parece que le gusta servir esta diversidad en su restaurante de típico.

Hay un costo de transacción para los agricultores, que tienen que hacer el viaje a la ciudad, pero los conductores de los buses rurales llevan de buena gana un saco de papas como equipaje. Los dos agricultores tienen un mercado a mano; el restaurante obtiene un suministro constante y, al eliminar al intermediario, alcanzan un precio superior al que el agricultor obtendría del mayorista, pero inferior al que el restaurante pagaría en el mercado.

Los restaurantes y otras empresas familiares son una salida natural para las fincas familiares, que llevan alimentos frescos y locales a las ciudades cercanas. Y las administraciones locales pueden ayudar a conectar a los pequeños agricultores con los clientes potenciales, que pueden tratar directamente entre ellos. Los dueños de restaurantes pueden llamar por teléfono a los agricultores cuando necesiten productos. Este tipo de comercialización directa era impensable hace treinta años, cuando los agricultores latinoamericanos tenían poco acceso a teléfonos, y mucho menos a un celular en su bolsillo.

Previamente en el blog de Agro-Insight

A market to nurture local food culture

Optando por la agricultura

Vea el video

Recuperemos las papas nativas

 

Design by Olean webdesign